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US Air Force Recruiting Service A Trio of Items Relating to WAF: Women in the Air Force. .Quincy, IL.1963-1965
US Air Force Recruiting Service A Trio of Items Relating to WAF: Women in the Air Force. .Quincy, IL.1963-1965


 
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Price: $150.00

Product Code: 29019147

Description
 
This small collection encompasses a trio of items relating to the recruitment of WAF, or Women in the Air Force.  According to the brochures in this collection the career fields open to WAF were personnel, administration, supply, education and training, air traffic control and warning, transportation, accounting, finance, auditing, and medical assistant (in either medical or dental fields). Additionally officers in the WAF were "active in the realm of space, in assignments as psychologist, physicists, chemist, and other scientific specialties".  The three items in this collection are: 1) "Opportunity for Young Women", a folded double sided folded brochure that provides basic information on the requirements and benefits of being a WAF. There is a tear off section to send in for more information. Additionally there are several small black and white printed photographs of WAF in action, as well as a colored illustration of a WAF on the front cover. Printed on the base of the brochure is: "CWE 64-1B-250M  * GPO : 1963 0-698-290"   2) "Your Daughter in the US Air Force", 14 page booklet with illustrated wrappers. There are images from  photographs throughout of various WAF at their jobs or socializing. It is clear the booklet's aim was to parents of young women in order to help them either encourage their daughters to join or alleviate their fears from their daughters joining the USAF. "A young woman's years of service in the Air Force will give her more poise and maturity, and a better understanding of the world in which she will live... a young woman who learns one of the technical skills of the Aerospace Age has a bright future. In or out of the Service, good jobs await women with this kind of experience... your daughter's living quarters and off-duty hours will be supervised by women officers, specially selected and trained.... As parents you will experience a deep sense of pride that your daughter is working at an interesting and challenging job. Pay starts at $78.00 dollars a month."  Printed on the back is: "CWE 64-28-150M * GPO: 1964 O-773-745.  3) "WAF: Women in the Air Force", a single fold brochure directed towards young women themselves. It is printed in blue and has five printed photographs of WAF in action. The tone of this brochure fluctuates between flattering and condescending, and uses a combination of historical references of women's roles in previous conflicts, to their current hopes for career and independence, the possibility of travel, and possible romantic future to attract recruits. "Rosie the riveter and her sister the sergeant rejected the kitchen sink and the Monday wash in the brave new postwar world...  two major avenues leading to a commission are open to WAF... the Air Force Academy, of course, is not open; no female may be admitted to these hallowed halls as cadet, but a WAF officer did serve as a registrar there for six years... while there are some variations in the type of quarters the enlisted WAF will find at her duty station, they offer the comforts and off-duty life that is not unlike a college sorority house...  only unmarried girls may enlist, but there is no prohibition against marriage once they are in the Air Force... The Air Force, as a matter of fact, tends to be sympathetic toward young love when it blossoms on an Air Force base. Some 15 percent of the WAF are married to husbands in Air Force Uniforms... it is tougher for a girl to get into the Air Force than it is for a man. She must pass tests with a higher marks... while she is not required to do push-ups or run the four minute mile, the physical requirements are as exacting in the own way as they are for the men... while the majority [of WAF] find their way into some type of administrative duty... a few of the girls somehow manage to attach themselves to more unusual occupations. One is a traffic dispatcher for an air police squadron. And amazingly, a WAF was recently nominated Maintenance 'Man' of the Month for her work in Electronic Countermeasures shop." Printed on the back is "S65-3534". According to a stamp on all three of these brochures, they originated at US Air Force Recruiting Service in Quincy, IL, which was ran by SSGT Paul W. Vest. The WAF were eventually disbanded in 1976 when women were accepted into the USAF on an equal basis as men.  The largest measures 10 1/2" x 8 1/4". To view this collection, please click on the following link: https://photos.app.goo.gl/jcrAyrA1nYpciZhK7. The National Security Act of 1947 formed the basis of the US Air Force as separate branch of the US Military (prior to that it was a part of the US Army), and in 1948 WAF was formed under the Women's Armed Services Integration Act, which also allowed women to serve directly in the military rather than the 'auxiliary' roles they held in the past. At this point the military began actively recruiting women to fill a variety of, mostly administrative, rolls. For the USAF there were specific requirement for WAF. They were to be between the ages of 18 and 27 (though if younger than 21 written consent from a parent or guardian was required), a high school graduate, unmarried and without dependents, pass a mental and physical exam, and of "good moral character" (normally determined by written references from the young woman's community).