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Fairy, Children's Vehicles - Velocipedes, Tricycles, Trailer Carts, Biplane Flyers & Bicycles. Colson Corporation.Elyria, Ohio .[1930]
 Fairy, Children's Vehicles - Velocipedes, Tricycles, Trailer Carts, Biplane Flyers & Bicycles. Colson Corporation.Elyria, Ohio .[1930]


 
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Price: $100.00

Product Code: 29001470

Description
 
An 8 pg. folded brochure for Fairy Children's Vehicles, a company that made a variety of children's vehicles, such as velocipedes, tricycles, trailer carts, biplane flyers (Scooters), and bicycles. The front cover of this brochure has various two color illustrations of children, boys and girls of varying ages, playing on Fairy's products. A fold-out catalogue. The initial narrative describes how our impostor brands aren't as durable or reliable as Fairy and that "children are very hard on their playthings... [Fairies] are made to withstand this abuse and should damage occur, service is instantly available from any of the branch warehouses and service stations." The remaining pages feature larger, more realistic illustrations of the actual item sold along with some general information such as model number or wheel size. Some captions gender specific  "for boys under seven" or "for boys over seven". At no time do they ever state that their vehicles could be used by girls. Even in the illustrations of children playing on the front cover, the girls are either the wagon being pulled by a boy or on gentler velocipedes or scooters.   This brochure was compliments of the Cremieux Hardware Company in Chicago which appears to have been an authorized seller of Fairy products. 8 pgs fold brochure. Measures 6 3/4" x 5 1/2" (folded), 22" x 6 3/4" (unfolded). Fairy children's vehicles was a line produced by the Colson Corporation located in Elyria, OH. In the 1920s they had opened around seventeen stores in major cities all over the US to sell and repair their products, however once the Great Depression came, the company fell into receivership and was broken up into smaller companies.