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An Address before the Emma Willard Association and a collection of School work by Helen Harrison Hadley (nee Morris) from her time at Vassar College
An Address before the Emma Willard Association and  a collection of School work by Helen Harrison Hadley (nee Morris) from her time at Vassar College


 
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Price: $275.00

Product Code: 27003116

Description
 
This grouping or 21 works begins with an address made by Helen Harrison Hadley  to the Emma Willard Association at their annual banquet in November 1901. The Association’s mission was to unite the graduates of the Troy Seminary in a friendly alliance, and to co-operate in promoting the cause of higher education among women. Emma Willard was an American women's rights activist who dedicated her life to education who founded the first school for women's higher education, the Troy Female Seminary in Troy, New York. Hadley was a member of this association, and it unknown if she gave this address or simple kept a copy of it. The address starts: “Our daughters cannot advantageously be medieval at the present day…. Time was when the right to study earnestly, to think intelligently, to base one’s daily action on reason and self-control, was reserved for men; but that is not more.”  Includes a written and typed copy of the address. Additionally, this offering includes a collection of 18 additional writings of Hadley. The bulk of the materials are 14 school assignment in essay format Hadley wrote for various courses during her time at Vassar. These assignments ranged from essays to short story telling, to book reports to her answer to a test. Most of the assignments have been graded in red pen and often start with an outline before the essay. Helen would graduate Vassar in 1883. Below are the titles of the Assignments: "Are Woman Inferior to Men?" "Nicaragua" (which describes her cousins trip there) "The Wit and Wisdom of Children" x2 "People and their Hobbies" "Having a Picture Take" "The Two Portraits of Shakespeare" "The Use and Abuse of Policy" x2 "The Word Painting in "A Princess of Thule ", a novel by W. Black "Advertising and it Oddities" "Swift: Shall We Pity or Despise Him?" "A Brother and Sister" Test The essays present an interesting view as to the character and beliefs of Ms. Hadley.   Helen would graduate Vassar in 1883, and marry Arthur Twining Hadley in 1891. Arthur would become the 13th President of Yale in 1899. It would appear that for the summer of 1899, Helen spent the majority of the time in New Haven, helping her husband settle into his new role, while a caretaker looked after her three children: her two sons Morris and Hamilton, and her new born daughter, Laura, at the family farmstead in Sandy Hook, CT. There are four letters from that time which are essential reports to Helen on how her children are doing. The four letters are held together by a blue ribbon, most of which has become detached. Another item in this collection is a letter from Edward G Fullerton, a graduate student in the Divinity School at Yale. It appears that he had broken his leg, and Helen had loaned him her copies of the Century Magazine which help to “while away very pleasantly several hours of [his] imprisonment”. The letter continues on to discuss the fact that Fullerton misses seeing the starts at the Yale Observatory. What is truly remarkable about this letter is the pen drawing done by Fullerton, showing him walking with crutches in a cast. To view this collection please click on the following link: https://photos.app.goo.gl/cN50huSmpE2yvHbs1