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3 Autograph Albums - Campmeetings. .Oak Bluff.1874-1883
3 Autograph Albums - Campmeetings. .Oak Bluff.1874-1883


 
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Price: $600.00

Product Code: 27002200

Description
 
These three albums are being offered as a collection. Two of these albums are near complete, while the album with the latest dates is sparse, with only 25 of the 100 or so pages used. One album has a board cover in brown cloth, with "Autographs" gilt stamped on the cover and spine. The other two albums have leather board covers, with "Autographs" stamped in gilt, and additional gilt decorations on the cover and spine.   One of the albums was owned by Edward Roth, who spent the majority of his life practicing medicine in and around Martha's Vineyard. The majority of the autographs in this album date from 1883 when he departed to San Francisco and he is wished well on his travels across the continent. He practiced for several years in San Francisco before returning to New England, first to Yale, and then Martha's Vineyard. Along with the autographs there are several newspaper clippings for important family events, such as his marriage to Miss E. L. Beetle and the first birthday party of his son Edward Roth Jr. There are also 3 hand drawn illustrations as well. Along with the notes regarding the death of the signers, there are also a few denoting whether or not they were since married . Two of the albums are 6 1/2" x 3 1/2"; the third is 7" x 4 1/2". Includes signatures from a wide variety of people, including signatures from local authors such as SC Wheeler, the Roth family, and crew members of the USRC Samuel Dexter, a ship famous for it's role in the rescue of the SS City of Columbus in 1884.  . The first so-called campmeeting in what became known as Wesleyan Grove was held in 1835. In subsequent years the congregations grew enormously, and many of the thousands in attendance were housed in large tents known as "society tents." A congregation from a church on the mainland would maintain its own society tent. Conditions were cramped, with men and women sleeping dormitory-style on opposite sides of a central canvas divider. All with cover wear; loose or partially detached covers.  Some soiling from handling.