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A Grand Musical Soiree Invitation, featuring Geogre W. Dixon, March 26, 1835. .Massachusett.March 26, 1835
A Grand Musical Soiree Invitation, featuring Geogre W. Dixon, March 26, 1835. .Massachusett.March 26, 1835


 
Price: $50.00

Product Code: 26001100

Description
 
An invitation printed on green paper, with decorative border. It invites you, at the cost of 25 cents with "proceeds to be given to some Charitable Institution" to come to a grand musically soiree. There George W. Dixon, the 'American Melodist' will perform his 'Classical Illustration and Patriotic Songs.  At the bottom of the invite is a small hand written note that says "Abigail come to the Service." Measures 7 1/2"  4 3/4". Some marks around the original crease folds. Small red dots stains on the top. Otherwise fine. Dixon was  was an American singer, stage actor, and eventually a owner and editor. In the early 1800s, he rose to prominence as a blackface performer, possibly the first American to do so, after performing "Coal Black Rose" and "Zip Coon" the later which became one of his most famous acts. The more famous Dixon became the more he was able to include in his shows satire and political commentary. By the 1830s, Dixon began to express serious interest in journalism, eventually bought and edited the 'Dixon's Daily Review' a small paper Lowell, Massachusetts, a small town growing out of the Industrial Revolution. The paper supported the Whig Party, Radical Republicanism, and the working class. It also explored morality and women's place in the rapidly changing society of the urban North. This outspoken tone, while appreciated by the working class of the times, did not win him many friends. He was forced to sell his paper by the end of the year. He would spend much of his later career in New York, publishing articles that exposed the misconducts of the rich, and how they preyed on the lower classes. His articles often resulted in violence, with either himself or the subject(s) of the article being attacked. He also was in court numerous times, on charges of libel and wrongful death. He was even sentenced to 6 months of  hard labor once. Dixon later retired to New Orleans, Louisiana, in the late 1840s. He died on February 27, 1861 from pulmonary tuberculosis.