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Anonymous The Round Trip to California by a young boy... The Tale of Three Cross-Country Road Trips. .United States.Summers 1939, 1946, & 1948
Anonymous The Round Trip to California by a young boy... The Tale of Three Cross-Country Road Trips. .United States.Summers 1939, 1946, & 1948


 
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Price: $250.00

Product Code: 20200695

Description
 
This travel journal belonged to an unknown, intelligent, and inquisitive young boy, who with his family makes several cross country road trips during the summers of 1938, 1946, and 1948. The boy's entries reflect his interest in nature, both plant and animal life, as well as science, particularly geology. Not to mention his excitement at almost nightly camping. The boy meticulously recorded everything in these entries: the locations they visited, where they camped and events such as being woken by coyotes or car horns, his sister Barbie attempting to stalk a mountain goat, and the number  of fish each family member caught. Based on his writing he mostly likely was between 7-10 years old on the first trip. As he ages, it is he  reflected in the depth of his writing, as well as his mentions of sometimes driving the car himself and the visiting of various college campus on the latter trips. The colleges specifically mentioned are: Cornell, University of Michigan, Stanford, Pomona College, Berkeley College, and Reed College. It should be noted that the father of the family is a professor, therefore the reasons for the visits may have been for either father or son. The first two road trips in the journal have specific dates, the first of which starts on June 22, 1939 in the Berkshires in Massachusetts and continues to July 27, 1939 when the family has reached San Francisco, CA. There are almost daily entries on this trip, with the exception of a break from June 27 to July 2 when the boy is visiting his Grandmother in Chicago. Family members on this trip are his parents and Barbara "Barbie", presumably his sister. The second road trip takes place seven years later, and starts on June 21, 1946 in Boston, MA. and continues to August 8, 1946 soon after the family reached Kings Canyon National Park in Fresno County, CA. During this journey, there are mentions of two additional (younger) siblings, Johnny and Binnie, as well as various Aunts, Uncles, and cousins. These two road trips are entitled "Round Trip to California", neither record the trip back to the Northeast. During the second trip in 1946, the father while in Berkeley, CA, applies for a job a UC Berkeley. The father manages to secure a teaching position for a year, teaching "the Whitman Course" and Freshman English. They family promptly buys a house just outside of Berkeley, and at the end of the road trip on August 8, travel back to Berkeley rather than Massachusetts. The last road trip is entitled "N. W. Trip", doesn't include dates, just '1st night', '2nd night', etc. Luckily one of the last days of the trip is labeled as Sunday, July 4, so the assumption has been made that this trip was taken during the summer of 1948, and the trip starts in California and over the next ten days the group makes their way up the coast, through Oregon and Washington and crossing over the border into Canada. Some of the locations visited by the family on their trips are: Berkshire Mountains, Buffalo, NY, Niagara Falls (including the Cave of Winds, ferrying across Lake Erie, Lake Michigan, Chicago, IL, Yellowstone National Park (including the geysers: Old Faithful, Riverside and Castle, and hiking Bunsen Peak and the Grand Canyon of Yellow Stone), Grand Teton Park, Yosemite, Badlands, Mount Rushmore, Petrified Forest National Park, Devil's Tower, Big Horn Mountains, Glacier National Park, Flathead Lake, Spokane, WA,  the Columbia River in Arlington, OR, Portland, OR, Crater Lake, Shasta Dam, San Francisco (including the Golden Gate Bridge), Monterey CA, Los Angeles Valley, and Sequoia National Park. Throughout all of this the family participates in a variety of outdoor exercises such as hikes, horseback rides, camping, fishing, swimming and canoeing, plus strictly educational adventures, such as a lecture on navigating by the stars at a Planetarium in Chicago. Depending on the topic, the boy describes these educational adventures in great detail. For example, he records the grades of petrified wood from the Petrified Forest National Park (along with what the wood is made out of) the scientific process of extracting gold from lead gold mines in South Dakota, the different rock types found in the national parks, and the process of smelting copper from Anaconda Smelter Stack  in Montana. It is during this trip that he starts to write on every other page, so that the more in depth scientific records are on the opposite side of his daily travel entries. At times these entries include what animals he saw that day. Also taped into the journal on these pages is a piece of copper from the Anaconda Smelter Stack in Montana, a piece of obsidian from the Obsidian Cliffs in Yellowstone, and an unknown dried flower. Some of the animals the boy recorded seeing are: prairie dogs, grizzly bears, elk, coyotes, cinnamon bears, mountain goats, sea lions, moose, magpies, pelicans, red headed woodpecker, and gophers. While the majority of the road trips appear to have been full of laughter and fun, there are mentions of bad times. Of note is the boy witnessing his mother cry due to her sciatica nerve pain, and when Binney, his young, possibly infant, sister contracts polio. Luckily Binney had a mild case of Polio and only stayed in a hospital in San Francisco, CA, for a short duration. In fact the boy describes his sister's brush with polio as an "almost uneventful case of Polio with no after effects". Lastly, throughout the journal there is evidence of the family playing the classic road trip game where the goal is to find the license plates of every state in the US. As such during the 1939 trip state names are randomly written in between the entries or on the margins. On the other trips one or two pages are segregated from the rest of the journal to record the plates found. Additionally at the back of the journal there is another list of state license plates, animals seen, and drawings of different types of arrow heads. Black leather covers. Interior pages have red fore-edge painting. Nearly half full. Measures 7 3/4" x 4 3/4". Below are some excerpts from the journal: "We saw a little prairie [sic] dog on the way through Yellowstone, park. We saw some antelope [sic] and some grizzely [sic] bears and one black bear. The brown bears that come out on the road our brown black bears. We saw some grazing buffalo. We climbed down the grand canyon. We got wet by the spray of the river falls. There were lots of little stones that we slipped on. We had to climb to get in or out of the grand canyon then we went to the grizzly bears feeding ground then we came back to the cabins and went to bed." - July 2, 1939, Yellowstone National Park "We are geting [sic] ready to go to Fallen Leaf Lake. We are packing our sut [sic] cases. We are going to Fallen Leaf Lake. We are passing lots of irrigation diches [sic]. We saw a dam in south eastern Idaho. We are going through desert, they went to bed." - July 11, 1939 "Matte is the name for the ore when it is 46 or 47% pure.  99 43/100 % pure copper sells for 14 1/2 cents a pound. This copper is shipped in 430 lb. plates, each one worth $62.35. It takes 8 hours in the copper furnaces to bring the content from 85-90% up to 99 43/100%. For the heat used in the process they use their own Montana natural gas. Arsenic, a by product of copper is used in making paint, glass, as a wood preservative, insecticide, [and] poison." - July 10th, 1946, Anaconda Smelter Stack and Mines, Anaconda, MT "... Daddy pointed out an animal descending from a snow field and slowly grazing upon reaching the alpine meadow on a cliff above the lake... he appeared to be either a a goat or a very light brown deer. Barbie and I first decided to stalk him, so we climbed the snow bank that he had just come from and slide down on our feet. When we looked over the little bank at the bottom, the mountain goat was staring us in the face about 50 yards off..." - July 14, 1946, on Logan Pass in West Glacier, MT "We started out from S. F. [San Francisco] and went to Stanford U. outside of Palo Alto and looked around the whole campus, which is very pretty and spacious with Jilly Mears and Jean Eliel as guides. After we went to visit the Mear's at there [sic] house, I hadn't realized before how much I liked Jean Eliel. She was exceedingly nice and pretty today. We camped out in the fog at trailer camp grounds near Monterey at the start of the 17 mile drive, after having had an abalone steak dinner." - August 3, 1946,  Stanford University, Stanford, CA "2nd night in a wild meadow near a plowed scrapped place. During the second day we went up to the end of the declining (in scenic value) route, and went over the redwood highway #101, stopping in on the Fanums. Anthony & Nick & I went swimming in the Eel river. Saw world's tallest tree, a redwood, +/- 10 feet thick & 364 feet high. Saw all the redwood groves and slept in a semi meadow. Day was foggy and very warm on land." - circa June 27, 1948, Redwood National and State Park in California. To view images, click: https://photos.app.goo.gl/GJs66W9dgK2dzUxM9.