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Norman Carr, M. D. Birth Control, Plain Medical Information. Lanteen Laboratories, INC., under the auspices Medical Bureaus of Information on Birth Control.Chicago, IL.1934
Norman Carr, M. D. Birth Control, Plain Medical Information. Lanteen Laboratories, INC.,  under the auspices Medical Bureaus of Information on Birth Control.Chicago, IL.1934


 
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Price: $125.00

Product Code: 20200647

Description
 
A short 22pp booklet about the different methods of birth control available to women in the 1930s. This booklet attempts to straddle a very fine line between the moral and religious ideals, and women's reproductive rights, however it often manages to contradict itself in doing so. It starts off by saying that "Motherhood is the grandest, richest and the most glorious experience which may occur in a woman's life.... it is too wonderful to treat it lightly and too sacred to thrust it upon a woman against her will...", which appears to be a very pro-life woman's right stance in regard to all women, regardless of circumstance. However it soon becomes very clear that this stance is only considered moral and ethical by them under very strict conditions: "those few who still say they are opposed to Birth Control are often very ignorant of the problem about which they attempt to argue.... they often do not distinguish between Birth Control and abortion.... Birth Control, as advocated by ethical persons and organizations, is not meant for the illicit use of the unmarried, but is designed for the protection of the health and happiness of married couple... Birth Control in marriage is not a religious question, it is a matter of economics and health." After this outlining of when birth control should be used, the booklet proceeds to describe the various methods of birth control, and the pros and cons of each. Methods that are not recommended are: inter-uterine stems often called gold buttons or wishbones (a pre cursory to today's modern hormonal IUDs), douching, withdrawal, suppositories, and male condoms (because "in most cases it is unsatisfactory to one or both parties, occasionally harmful; and due to defective material, especially the cheaper kind, it often fails as a contra-ceptive", a position that is currently recognized as untrue). Next the booklet continues on to recommended two different types of birth control methods, though first they do stress that any and all of these methods must be done before intercourse starts. The first approved method recommended is contra-ceptive jelly, which in order to use, one must determine what class of woman you are.  "First class" women are "brides and wives who have not yet borne a child or suffered a miscarriage", and therefore can just smear the jelly over one's cervix. Second class women, women who have only had one child and suffered no "birth damage" to the cervix, might be able to just use the contra-ceptive jelly, but probably should use it with a tampon or cap, and third class women are those who have had more than one child or birth damage and then must use the jelly with a tampon or cap. The second approved method is the diaphragm, often called the female condom, which according to the the 1930 International Conference on Birth Control, it is "the best known method of contra-ception." Next the booklet provides information on the Medical Bureaus of Information on Birth Control who had medical offices in Chicago and Detroit where women could attend free lectures on birth control and also would be able to see only female physicians. A short section on the "Legal and Ethical" practices of birth control follow, which essentially state that birth control is not illegal and that "one of the moral reasons for the practice of Birth Control is that it eliminates the dangers of illegal abortions".  Lastly there are four pages of advertisements for Lanteen Birth control products themselves, such as their various jellies, tampons and caps. The booklet contains several illustrations of the products, diagrams on how to use them, and three small illustrations of the cervix so that a woman can better understand the different classes of women.  Illustrated wrappers. Staple binding. OCLC 2  (APR 2020) Measures 6 3/4" x 3 1/4"..