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Rufus P. Stebbins Address of the Subject of Peace, Delivered at the Odeon, On Sabbath Evening, February 7, 1836. On the Anniversary of the Bowdoin Street Young Men's Peace Society. William Peirce.Boston, MA.1936
Rufus P. Stebbins Address of the Subject of Peace, Delivered at the Odeon, On Sabbath Evening, February 7, 1836. On the Anniversary of the Bowdoin Street Young Men's Peace Society. William Peirce.Boston, MA.1936


 
Price: $100.00

Product Code: 20200178

Description
 
The item is a copy of an address given by Rev. Rufus P. Stebbins, (1810-1885), a member of Harvard Divinity School on the society's first anniversary in 1836. His speech was considered to be an attack against the concept of a "defensive war". That term is defined as a war in which one country is mainly just trying to defend themselves from another, versus a war where both sides are attacking, invading, and trying to conquer each other. In this way, according to the "Just War tradition", which is a doctrine on military ethics, a defensive war is considered to be a "moral justifiable" criteria for war by military strategists. After the address is printed the first annual report of the society as well as its constitution and list of its current members. Noted members of the society were Amasa Walker, Charles K. Whipple, Isaac Knapp, and Rev. Henry C. Wright. It is unclear if the society was at the time of its establishment attempting to fight against a particular war, or the idea of war in general. It should be noted though that America had just finished one of its Indian wars (Black Hawk War in 1832), and had just embarked on another Indian War, the Second Seminole War, in 1934 (also known as the Florida War and it would continue until 1842). 32 pg. Missing wrappers. OCLC 5 (July 2020). Measures 8 1/2" x 5 1/4". Below is an excerpt from the address. "... War is not satisfied with this. It demands our lives. The very object of war is to kill. It is murder; 'cool, calculated, money making' murder. It is murder in its worst forms. Crime is stamped as a virtue... [war] originate[s] in the worst passions of the human heart, it produces the most disastrous effects upon man's happiness and virtue. Surely then war is unchristian, and Christians should not engage in it. But I shall be asked, if all war is wrong; if we must not, sometimes, vindicate our rights by sword, and by the same instrument, sometimes maintain our honor? In other words, I shall be asked if defensive war is wrong. It is a just and proper question, and should be answered. I shall answer it in the language of our holy religion. Love you enemies; bless them that curse you; do good to them that hate you; and pray for those that despitefully use you and persecute you... I ask, once more, and ask in solemn earnestness, those who advocate defensive war, to define it. The fact is, in war, might gives right. If you conquer, it is a glorious cause; if you fail, you are hung for treason. Christians, then, I repeat it, never should fight. ". The Bowdoin Street Young Men's Peace Society was a pacifism society founded in February 1835 with a ladies branch added in March of the same year. They are perhaps most well known for distributing a pamphlet that is widely considered to be the first attempt at peace education directed at the youth. It featured a conversation between two young brothers, William and Frank, as one attempts to educate the other on the Principles of Peace.