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Dr. S. H. Monell Announcement for The Coil and Static Club of the United States. .New York, NY.[1900]
Dr. S. H. Monell Announcement for The Coil and Static Club of the United States. .New York, NY.[1900]


 
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Price: $85.00

Product Code: 20200083

Description
 
A single-fold brochure announcement of a medical society Monell was forming, called the Coil and Static Club, whose purpose was to "carry out a practical plan for keeping an up-to-date revision of clinical methods and new work constantly at the command of all physicians who use Therapeutic Apparatus." At the charge of a $1 initiation fee and annual dues of $5, the society would provide the members five benefits. First, a "year book", which was a bound copy of all relevant literature and articles published on electro-therapeutics that year. Second, a quarterly bulletin to review the new work of the society's members. Third, an annual convention which the doctors could gather and discuss new developments in the field. Fourth, free access to a laboratory for clinical research (mostly likely to be located in New York). Fifth, and last, access to a "first class laboratory expert [who] will be employed by the Society, competent to conduct physiological and pathological investigations". It is unclear if this society every really got off the ground as there appears to be no record of it, and the announcement also does state that "it is the common interest of all to enlist a large membership, as no other course will permit the benefits to be gathered and placed before each of us as needed." . Measures 6" x 3 1/2" (folded), 7" x 6" (unfolded).. Dr. Samuel Howard Monell was a doctor who promoted and practiced electro-therapeutics, which uses electricity as a means of alleviation and curing of diseases. Monell specifically used static electricity in his treatments, and he claimed that it could cure acne, lesions, insomnia, abnormal blood pressure, depression and hysteria. Electro-therapeutics is actually still a therapy used today, though mainly in the field of physical rehabilitation.