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George Clement Lord A Collection of 21 Letters belonging the Lord's Family Shipping Company. .Kennebunk, ME and Boston, MA.1836-1861
George Clement Lord A Collection of 21 Letters belonging the  Lord's Family Shipping Company. .Kennebunk, ME and Boston, MA.1836-1861


 
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Price: $1,500.00

Product Code: 20128001

Description
 
A collection of twenty-one (21) letters belonging to the Lord Family of Kennebunk, ME, mostly regarding their shipping company, which was also based in Boston, MA. The letters date from 1836 to 1861, and are mostly addressed to George C. Lord. Though a few of the letters are from employees or customers of the company the majority are from family members involved in the business. These members (and their relationship to George) are: his father, Captain George Lord, his brothers Edward W Lord and Charles Edward Lord, and later, his son, Charles E. Lord. A variety of shipping business subjects are covered in the letters, such as the types of cargo and their value (some goods mentioned are cotton, tallow, logwood, salt, railway supplies, and coal), several legal cases for the settlement of claims due to cargo loss, the sale of ships, insurance policies on the ships and cargo, various ship Captains employed by them, ship routes, and the various political policies that effect the shipping business such as the Letters of Marque issued by Confederate President Jefferson Davis that effectively sanctioned piracy as legal. Some of the ships mentioned in the letters are: ‘International', 'Josephine', 'G. W. Brown', 'Rigulator', 'Crimea', 'Golden Eagle', 'Hayes', 'Royal', and 'York'. The names of the ships owned by the company often reflect the names of family members or past favored employees. Also discussed are various family matters, such as relatives' health or present life. One letter from a customer discusses the transport of 'fleshpots of Egypt', which could alternatively mean either actual pots of meat or prostitutes. While in the end the author does seem to be referring to actual meat, the terminology he uses prior to that is more than slightly ambiguous. The last two letters in the collection are from 1861, on the eve of the American Civil War and discusses the author's, Charles E. Lord, displeasure at the hypocrisy of the North who no longer want a war when it hits them in their pocket books, as well as the effect the war is having on the shipping business. Four of the letters come with corresponding envelopes, however the majority of the letters were folded paper with stampless post. The collection is arranged chronologically, one letter is missing a date. Below are some excerpts from the letters:

"Thirdly your sympathy and sorrow expressed for my having had to pay twice the 3-9 to the port to look after the fleshpots of Egypt I thank you for. But surely you who no doubt go nightly and perhaps daily down into that very Montezuma of Egypt enjoying and all the luxuries of that balmy, soft, and delicious land - ought not to chasten a poor old fellow who can no longer journey there and can only now enjoy the remembrance of the part by scenting fleshpots of that magical country in the shape of a thigh of pork."
-  Daniel Nason to George C. Lord, December 2, 1847

"Please ask father to write us how much insurance they will want on the Wm Brown, we will cancel present policies and take out new ones for the voyage. Present policies expire Dec 1st - should think $36000 on the ship and either 10 or 15000 on charter out. They must bear in mind that the commission on the homeward charter are to be paid lost or not safe - say $1500(sic) perhaps $12000 on charter would be enough. No news here. we notice the Henry Mann seen Aug 31 - Lat. 28 South of the Island of Madagascar, then out 70 days - at that rate she would not be in Rotterdam before Christmas - but we hope to hear of her at Falmouth by the steamer due tomorrow morning."
- George C Lord to his brother Edward W. Lord, September 1, 1852.

"In regards to business affairs I have nothing, I am sorry to say, very interesting or cheering to relate. The 'International' is in Dock discharging- has her between docks now about clear. While she was laying in the river they were obliged to keep one pump going most of the time to keep her free of water and when at sea in rough weather both, but since she has been in Dock, she leaks but very little - say one to two inches per hour.... Political affairs in the United States seem to have assumed a more peaceful aspect and yet as to the future we are as much in the dark as ever. I am sorry to see that the passage of the Tariff Bill has caused a great change in the minds of the people here - their sympathies seem to have made a complete change from the North to the South. It is very easy to see how deep seated their philanthropy is for the poor downtrodden slave when their own interests are at all encroached upon. I think the change in the Tariff just at this time was a very unwise thing with the North and one which will fail to have its desired effect. It will operate against the commercial interests of the North and be of no benefit to the manufacturing interest. Foreign merchandise with fine it way into the country through the Southern ports and Canada without paying the high duty and that the whole object of the tariff will be frustrated. Therefore in my opinion, if the new administration wish to save their 'credit and bacon', they had better abandon the Tariff scheme at once and look to some other source of revenue."
- Charles E. Lord to his father, George C. Lord, April 2, 1861

"The truly deplorable state of the anarchy which our one peaceful and happy country is now in makes all news coming from there of thrilling interest, though saddening to the hear to contemplate. It is comforting to now that the people of the North are so united and that party lines are so completely obliterated. If war must come I hope the President will bring all the resources of the country into the field and make on bold strike at the Rebels. It is too late now for any half way measures. they have desperate men to deal with and desperate measures must be used to put them down or the country is lost and ruined further... The underwriters at large are now asking from 1% to 10 % additional premium on cargo in American ships, depending upon their position or account of the Letters of Marque issued by Jeff Davis. "
- Charles E. Lord to his father, George C. Lord, May 4, 1861
George Clement Lord was born about 1823 in Kennebunk, Maine to Captain George Lord (1791-1861) and Olive Jefferds (1793-1879). He had five siblings: Hannah Elizabeth Lord (1817-1833), Lucy Hayes Lord (1818-1833), Olive Jeffords Lord (1821-1821-1829), Charles Howard Lord (1825-1892) and Edward W. Lord (1830-1903). He married his cousin, Marion Ruthven Watterson (1823-1910) in 1866. They had four children together: Robert Waterson Lord (1847-1908), Marion Ruthven Lord (1849-1910), Caroline Lucy Lord (1852-1859), and Charles Edward Lord (1858-1941).  George Lord does on February 23, 1893.

His son, Charles. is also involved in the shipping business. Charles marries Effie Marion Rogers (1860-?) in 1855 and they have three children together: George C. Lord (1890-?), Marian Watterston Lord (1892-?), and Charles R. Lord (1893-?). He dies on August 1, 1941. He most likely died in August 1978.