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ChildhoodSamuel Wood and SonsNew York
ChildhoodSamuel Wood and SonsNew York
Price: $18.00

paper book, possibly missing cover, string sewn in and tied to bind. Childhood is a book of verses with the chapters; Going to School, School, Writing, See-Saw, Repeating, I Spy, and Swinging. The end of the book admonishes children to "repay their tender parents with filial regard and kind offices." 3 1/4" x 2" . possible missing cover, worn , foxing more info
Jane Andrews. The Seven Little Sisters Prove Their Sisterhood, by Jane Andrews. Lee & Shepard Publisher.Boston.1892
Jane Andrews. The Seven Little Sisters Prove Their Sisterhood, by Jane Andrews. Lee & Shepard Publisher.Boston.1892
Price: $20.00

A 162 paginated book tells the story of seven young girls, each representing seven different nationalities in order to showcase how different people around the world have different mannerism and customs.  The book is divided into six parts: Agoonack, and Her Sail Upon the Ice Island, A Long Journey Through a Strange Island, What Was Gemila Doing All This Time?, New Work for Pen-se and Lin, Can the Little Brown Baby do Anything? and Christmas-time Again for Louise. There are seven, including the cover page, charming black and white line drawings throughout the book. This book is a companion to 'The Seven Little Sisters Who Live on the Round Ball that Floats in the Air and' 'Ten Boys Who Lived on the Road from Long Ago to Now,'  also by Jane Andrews, and is  intended as an elementary text book, with pronunciation and vocabulary lists in the back. Copyrighted in 1877. Measures 7" x 5". Covers show edge wear. There is a top piece of the cover missing on the backstrip and there are some minor stains on the back cover. The inside front cover is inscribed by a previous owner. Interior pages are slightly toned and soiled due to age. Otherwise fine. more info
Chang Chee
Chang Chee
Price: $25.00

6 preliminary leaves, 137 pages including frontispiece, with illustrations by Laura Bannon. First Edition. This book tells the story of Chang Chee, a young Chinese boy. The marketing material that was distributed when this book was published describes Change as a boy “…with the eyes of an artist, whether in the rice fields where he helped his mother, or on the green hills where he took the water buffalo to graze. Colors for him were like magic, and he hopes some day [sic] to become a great artist. Beautifully told, and for children who do not always demand an exciting plot.” Measures 8 1/2" x 7" more info
The Polite Present, or manual of good mannersMunroe and FrancisBoston 1834
The Polite Present, or manual of good mannersMunroe and FrancisBoston 1834
Price: $28.00

71 pp. illustrated printed paper cover, hand sewn string binding. Contents include 38 rules for children's behavior (at church, lying, awkward speech, cleanliness, mimicry and waggery, at table, and conversation to name a few). there is a section of eight important cautions like taking God's name in vain, obscene expressions, and of disobedience to parents. Lastly there are ten short exhortations. 4" x 2 1/2". some foxing , inscribed more info
Program - Prof. A. S. Webster's Children's May Party, Eden Hall plus Financial Statement
Program - Prof. A. S. Webster's Children's May Party, Eden Hall plus Financial Statement
Price: $35.00

An 8" x 5 1/2" program for the Children's May Party at Eden Hall held May 1, 1896. It includes 21 dances.  At the end of the program is a note indicating Fall class for beginners will commence Oct. 3. Reverse is blank.  Additionally a single sheet financial statement on Eden Hall Company Jan. 1898. Each measure approximately 8" x 5 1/2". more info
Anna "Annie" Brown Pegg Goodbye Letter to Husband and Children written on Deathbed. .Alexandria, NJ.1900
Anna "Annie" Brown Pegg Goodbye Letter to Husband and Children written on Deathbed. .Alexandria, NJ.1900
Price: $50.00

In 1900 Annie Pegg wrote a letter to her husband and two children Sarah and James on her supposed deathbed (she would actually live until 1914 and have another child, Elizabeth). It is unknown if she was actually severely ill or just over dramatic, however the letter itself is very sincere. In it she writes that her husband should "forget me not when far away for you no I was true to you" and often asks her husband and children to put their "trust in God for he alone will care for you." She continues "this advice is from your Dear Mother, be true children to all" The letter is written in a notebook, that besides this letter is blank. The cover depicts two chicks and a frog with the phrase "You're No Chicken". Printed cover, tape binding on top. Measures 5 1/4" x 3 1/2". Anne, also known as Annie, was born on May 12, 1868 to Henry Smith Brown (1840-1896) and Charity Johnson (1839-1874) in Franklin, NJ. She married Christopher Pegg (1844-1920) in 1894 and had 3 children, Sarah J Pegg (1895-1984), James Green Pegg (1898-1975), and Elizabeth May Brown Pegg (1904-1991). She died on August 28, 1914. more info
 Newcomb's Picture Stories, Scripture Series, No. 1 Creation. Clement & Packard.New York.1841
Newcomb's Picture Stories, Scripture Series, No. 1 Creation. Clement & Packard.New York.1841
Price: $65.00

10 leaves. In verse. Hand colored. Tells the story of creation, how chaos became light, how animals and plants came to be, and eventually how man and woman were created. Each page has a hand colored engraving on it. On the back cover is a letter written direct to the parents of children that states, "We ask the aid of those parents who regard the highest interests of their offspring. And, in the beginning, we would remind them, that the success of the attempt depends very much on parents. If they will make the scenes here represented the subjects of frequent and familiar conversation with their children, filling up what is lacking in the instruction here communicated, they will ... increase very much the interest and value of the book." Measures 7 1/4" x 4 3/4".  OCLC  - 2 (March 2018) . Covers detached. Sewing repair to binding, though it is extremely loose. Soiled and toned due to age. more info
Recreation Department Pictures of a White Mountain Camp, A Summer Resort Brochure. The Outlook Company.New York, NY.[1910]
Recreation Department Pictures of a White Mountain Camp, A Summer Resort Brochure. The Outlook Company.New York, NY.[1910]
Price: $85.00

Fryeburg-on-the-Saco was a summer resort open from July 1st to October 1st in Fryeburg, ME. While technically it was a summer resort, it was a particular resort that is hard to accurately define. This is something the place recognizes itself, and indeed starts of the brochure with: "A Camp? Perhaps that term describes it as well as any one term can. The fact is that its uniqueness prevents the accurate use of a name which could be applied elsewhere. An assembly, a settlement, a summer school, a family of families -each of these names and a dozen others succeeds in standing for only one side of the life which is pleasantly associated in the minds of many with the banks of the Saco and the shady trees of old Fryeburg." The camp was also home to several organizations such as the Fryeburg School of Method, the Fryeburg School of Theology and the Church, the Maine Chautauqua Union, and the Sunday School Institute and Bible School. The camp contain several buildings, Normal Hall for classes, Grove House for its offices, an auditorium where daily lectures or concerts were held, cottages for the guests, and a dining hall. The camp's drinking and bathing water all came from one well on the property that was fed by a mineral spring. Throughout the brochure are fifteen (15) printed photographs of the grounds, building, Saco River and White Mountains. 24 pgs. Green printed wrappers. Staple binding. Measures 7 1/2" x 6". more info
Baptist Orphanage of Virginia twenty-second Annual Catalogue of the Baptist Orphanage of Virginia. The Orphanage News Printing Department.Salem, VA.5418
Baptist Orphanage of Virginia twenty-second Annual Catalogue of the Baptist Orphanage of Virginia. The Orphanage News Printing Department.Salem, VA.5418
Price: $85.00

The annual report of the Baptist Orphanage of Virginia, including a list of trustees, officers, board members, and perhaps most interesting a list of all the orphans and which orphanage they are located at. In 1914 there were 100 boys, and 87 girls, for a total of 187 orphans being helped by the Baptist Orphanages. Also included in the catalogue is the charter, rules of the corporation, a short historical sketch of the beginnings of the organization, a list of matters of interest, a report from the President, and charts of the expenditures and donations. Lastly there are printed photographs of each building on the campus and a short description. 48 pgs. Green printed wrappers. Staple binding. OCLC 2 (Dec 2019, doesn't say which years) 9" x 6 1/4". more info
Norman Carr, M.D. Marriage Hygiene, As Prescribed by Physicians . Lanteen Laboratories, INC.,  under the auspices Medical Bureaus of Information .Chicago.1938
Norman Carr, M.D. Marriage Hygiene, As Prescribed by Physicians . Lanteen Laboratories, INC., under the auspices Medical Bureaus of Information .Chicago.1938
Price: $150.00

A small booklet providing advice on "marriage hygiene", a rather unique and polite euphemism for family planning/birth control used within marriage. The booklet, at first, does seem to take a rather modern view of family planning and marriage, stating, "for generations past, our Anglo-Saxon prudery and false modesty have denied our women their rightful heritage. Intolerance have hidden from the mothers of our race authentic medical advice on the intimate problems of marriage." However they couch this belief on the "stern conditions of our present economic situations [which] compel us to face all realities of life sensibly," rather then simply stating this is information women deserve to know. Further more, when discussing the different possible birth control methods, the booklet strongly recommends against male condoms, which they call sanitary rubbers, since they "are often highly dissatisfactory and unpleasant to one or both parties," a myth that has been perpetuated by men, and is not true. Instead the booklet recommends the use of diaphragms. It discusses proper use and placement with several colored illustrations directing the reader on proper use and insertion. The last few pages are advertisements for various Lanteen products, such as their cap diaphragm, jelly, Mesinga type diaphragm and a cleansing antiseptic for douching. Their advertisement for douching products is highly ironic as earlier in the booklet they recommend against douching as "many douche solutions are actually harmful to the delicate tissues which are more sensitive than the lining of the throat." 22 pg. Staple binding. OCLC 6 (Feb. 2020) Measures 6 1/2" x 4 1/4". more info
 Three Letters from a Family Moving to South America. Buenos Aires, Argentina.February 1855
Three Letters from a Family Moving to South America. Buenos Aires, Argentina.February 1855
Price: $175.00

In early 1855, a husband and wife, moved to Buenos Aires, Argentina, Estancia del Folag with their two sons, Hasen and Jonathan. The collection contains three letters, comprised of eighteen pages, written to the wife's friend. Color vignette on first page with stationer's embossing on remaining sheets. The letters are only signed "Affectionally yours" with no name. The letters describe some of the hardship she had adjusting and the difficulty in settling up her household. The majority of the letters comprises of the retelling of a long carriage ride taken during the move. At first the wife seems determined to find fault in everything in South America, often mentioned the lack of manners of the locals and how filthy everything is. "There is no places of resort or of being of interest, no pleasant walks or rides, in fact nothing except catholic churches. Plenty of those if you are inclined to visit them." Eventually, she begins to enjoy her surrounds and find companionship in her neighbors, and in particular an American named Judy. She even waxes poetically about the fruit she can get there, and how much the whole family enjoys it. "I determined from the first of my decision to come to make up my mind to nothing and then I should not be disappointed." "I am not homesick, and though we are what many would call unpleasantly situated, I never had so happy [a] two months in my life as the last two." These three letters have been hand-bound by a thread into a booklet. The first page has a hand colored illustration on the top. Measures 8 1/2" x 5 1/2". Age toning and light soiling. The first page has a 1 1/2" x 1/2" spot of what appears to be red wax from a seal. more info
A. F. Merrill, D. P. Merrill, & E.M. Merrill A Set of Three Composition Notebooks belonging to the Merrill Siblings. .Falmouth, ME.1864-1869
A. F. Merrill, D. P. Merrill, & E.M. Merrill A Set of Three Composition Notebooks belonging to the Merrill Siblings. .Falmouth, ME.1864-1869
Price: $175.00

A set of three composition notebooks belong to the Merrill siblings of Falmouth, ME. Their names were: Abbie Frances Merrill (1853-1944), Deering P. Merrill (1857-1941), and Esther M. Merrill (1855-?).  Below is a description of each child's copybook: Esther's copybook is entitled "The Scholar's Economical Writing Book for Common Schools" and was published by Sanborn & Carter, with no publication date listed. As this copybook features what appears to be the beginning exercises of penmanship and writing, this book was most likely used by Esther in the early 1860s. The book starts off with writing exercises where a single letter is repeated before moving on to individual words and short sentences, such as "Alabama" and "A man manners influence his fortune". Esther's full name is also repeated on a page as she learned how to write it. The front cover features a geometric decorative border, while the back features are more symmetrical delicate decorative border and a multiplication table. Yellow wrappers. String Binding. OCLC 0 (Dec 2019) Measures 8 1/4" x 6 3/4" Abbie's copybook is entitled "The Young Lady's and Gentleman's Writing Book or Book for Compositions" published by O. L. Sanborn & Co. of Portland, ME. Abby has dated this book from 1864-1865. The copybook features a series of sentences repeated, such as: "Avoid temptation through fear that you might yield" and "Vice punishes itself but virtue secures its own reward." The last several pages are copied fake invites, receipts and short letters. The front cover has a decorative border that looks like lace. The back cover has a multiplication table. Dark blue wrappers. Sting binding. OCLC 0 (Dec 2019) Measures 8" x 7" 'Writing Book' is a copybook full of penmanship exercises belonging to Deering when he was twelve years old in 1869. The In additional various morality sayings that were repeatedly copied,  the book also features the repetition of common words or titles like Mr., Mrs., Miss, and the days of the week, as well as local building and businesses such as the local seminary school, 'Westbrook Seminary', and the court house. The book itself was published by L. S. Manufactory of Cambridgeport, MA, with no publication date. Illustrated teal wrappers with a school days border and an engraving at the center of a group of school children, one of which is wearing a dunce cap. The back features the same school days border with a engraving of the store front of L. S. Learned. Teal wrappers. Sting binding. OCLC 0 (Dec 2019) Measures 8 1/4" x 7". The Merrill siblings lived in Falmouth, ME in the mid 1800s. The children were born to John Alexander Pope Merrill (1823-1918) and Elizabeth Susan Merrill (1830-1907). The siblings names were: Abbie Frances Merrill (Feb 1853- Oct 8, 1944), Deering P. Merrill (1857- Dec 28, 1941), Esther M. Merrill (1855-?), Mary E. Merrill (April 2, 1866- Sept. 17, 1956), and Rueben Merrill (1878- Jan 29, 1979). more info
National Children's Home Society National Children's Home-Finder, Vol. III, No. 10. James L. Clark.Chicago, IL.2466
National Children's Home Society National Children's Home-Finder, Vol. III, No. 10. James L. Clark.Chicago, IL.2466
Price: $225.00

32 pp. Illustrated wraps. A magazine published by the National Children's Home Society which is a "parent society" that housed children or found homes for them. They were also involved in a variety of different charities, mainly aimed at helping poor families care for and educate their children. This magazine provided an update on their societies in different states, stories and pictures of children who had been placed in loving homes, articles about children, and letters written in by either a newly placed child or their new parents. Some of the titles of the articles and stories found within this volume are : "Jacob Riis on Baby Saving", "An Extensive Work", "Overworked Babies", "Jewish Orphans Let In", "A Useful Member of the Family", Sketches form Real Life", "Crime is to be Pruned from the Young Criminals by the Surgeon's Knife", "The Juvenile Court - Its Uses and Limitations", "The Cleveland Juvenile Court" and "Joey's Papa". One articles of note within this issue is the "Crime is to be Pruned from the Young Criminals by the Surgeon's Knife". The article discusses how sometimes surgery is needed to help children, specifically how it can help correct their bad behavior. They use two examples, one young boy whose skull was drilled into in order to supposedly relief pressure that had occurred from a fall he had taken years before. The other had brain surgery to remove "foreign growth that attacked the frontal lobe of his brain". What is slightly horrifying about this article is that the end of the article states "Of course the consent of the parents has to be gained before any operation can take place, and there is usually strenuous objection. But when the physicians and societies make it clear that it is a case of much jail or little hospital, they hospital wins the day." The boy in the second example was, a month later, still recovering from the surgery, with no evidence as to if he would recover fully or if the surgery even helped to improve his behavior. The magazine contains thirteen (13) black and white illustrations and/or printed photographs. The back cover has an advertisement for the Chicago Institute of Social Science for offers "training on social, philanthropic and civil work.". 32 pgs. Staple bindings. OCLC 0 (Feb. 2020, one library has some volumes, but no this one.) Measures 10" x 7 3/4". more info
John Leech Young Troublesome or Master Jacky's Holidays. Bradley & Evans.London.[1845-1850]
John Leech Young Troublesome or Master Jacky's Holidays. Bradley & Evans.London.[1845-1850]
Price: $300.00

A humorous story of Master Jack and his adventures around the holiday. Master Jack is a rambunctious, mischievous, young spoiled boy, who often, in his attempts to alleviate his boredom around the holidays, creates all sorts of trouble for his parents, sisters, and indulgent servants. For example, while playing with a new toy theater he received, he creates a "terrific explosion in the Housekeepers room". In another scene, when he was "privileged to leave the dining room with the ladies" he promptly takes "an undue advantage of his delightful position" by stealing a kiss from a lady. This book can be acted out as a play, as there is a list of characters or "Persons Represented" in the beginning. 12 pages. Engraving with hand finishing. Linen backed. Measures 10 3/4" x 7 1/4". more info
Summer Vacation Photographs of Prominent New England Families. .New England.1912-1917
Summer Vacation Photographs of Prominent New England Families. .New England.1912-1917
Price: $325.00

A photo album belonging to the Rowley family consisting of their vacation family photos from a variety of locations in New England in the early 20th century. Some of the vacation spots are: Bellow Falls, VT, Pemaquid Beach, ME, York Beach, ME, Kittery Point, ME, Portland, ME, Provincetown, MA, Nashua, NH, Gloucester, MA, Newport, RI, Boston, MA, and Lake Attitash, MA. The photographs consist of a variety of subjects- mainly photographs of the family themselves and the landscape and monuments at the places they visited. The family photos depict a relaxed family engaging in a variety of activities such as clamming, fishing, boating, walks, and photography. The majority of the photographs are labeled, either with the subjects name or location, and it is often times dated. The photographs in the album range form 1912-1917. There are over a hundred and ninety (190) photographs spread out over approximately 90 pages. The majority of the pages have two 4 3/4" x 3 3/4" photographs per page, though a portion do have larger groupings of smaller photographs. There is one large photograph of a couple, 9" x 7", attached to the interior front cover. Brown leather covers, with the gilded stamped text "Photographs"  on the upper left corner of the front cover. Interior pages are black, with string binding. Measures 11 3/4" x 7 1/4". The Rowley family was a prominent Massachusetts family connected to the Merriam family (of Merriam-Webster Dictionary fame). The album was sourced from a descendant of the Arthur Merriam Rowley (1883-1979). Arthur was born on August 3, 1883 in Springfield, MA to Hiram Curtis Rowley (1844-1922) and Thirza Jane Merriam (1845-1919). He was the grandson of Homer Merriam (on his mother side), who was one of the three Merriam brothers (Charles, George, and Homer) who became famous for printing the Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Arthur grew up in Springfield, MA with one older brother, Harold Merriam Rowley (1879-?). He would marry Earla Viola Steade (1887-1966) on August 16, 1911 in San Diego Ca. They had two children, Douglass Steade Rowley (1913-2007) and Earla Steade Rowley (1916-1993). Arthur died on August 9, 1979 in Springfield, MA. more info
Charlotte Alice Osgood Haskell Diary of Charlotte A Osgood of Georgetown, MA. .Georgetown, MA.1885-1889
Charlotte Alice Osgood Haskell Diary of Charlotte A Osgood of Georgetown, MA. .Georgetown, MA.1885-1889
Price: $525.00

A diary of a young woman from Georgetown, MA, named Charlotte Osgood. Her family were prominent in local society.  Covering four years, the journal starts with almost daily entries. As the years progress, the entries diminish in frequency, but are always picked up again during some of the exciting times in Charlotte's life. For example her trip to Provincetown in August of 1886. Charlotte also toured at Perkins School for the Blind and met Laura Bridgmen (the first American blind and deaf individual to be educated). The rest of her entries generally start with a note on the current weather, and detail her activities for the day. Such as who visited who, and where she went. Her daily activities consisted of a variety of meetings, such as church meetings, choir meetings, and missionary meetings. Charlotte loved music and often went to concerts and plays. Some of the quotes do revolve around the theme of government, perhaps an influence of her father. Towards the end of the journal, Charlotte has recorded a variety of her favorite songs, poems, and quotes, as well as a few recipes (for Lemon Sherbet and pop over. Below are a few excerpts from the journal. "Started south for Boston, about ten I saw Lanceirs and Major Perkins. Had a splendid time at the Blind School. Saw Mr. Anofer and Laura Bridgeman, left around 12:30. Dined at Marstou on drek [?} and banana fitters Went to the Museum and saw Devin Bouciciult in "the Lift", enjoyed it very much." - February 22, 1886 "In the afternoon, we went to Long Point and had beautiful time, took off my shoes and stockings, water awful cold. Singing in evening." - August 23, 1886, Provincetown Trip "When things go right, things come right for them" - Quote from The Squire of Sandal-Side by Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr "Judgment is a factor of government, so long as gov. continues, judgment  goes and is going on all the time..." "Good night, love; good night love, May heaven's brightest stars watch over thee, Good Angels spread their wings and cover thee, And thro' the night, so dark and still, Spirits of the light, charm thee from ill!" - Excerpt from "Good Night Dear Love, Good Night" a lullaby by Mrs. F. A. Butlee Journal is approximately three-quarters full. Marble covers. There is a wax seal is present on the first page of the journal. Measures 8 1/4 x 6 1/2" . Her family were prominent in local society with her father, Stephen Osgood (1826-1911), being a local wealthy merchant tailor and heavily involved in local politics. He even was a State Representative and State Senator for a time, as well as being a appointed as Postmaster General for the area in 1904. Charlotte Alice Osgood was born on November 20, 1862 to Stephen Osgood (1826-1911) and Sarah Palmer Carter (1829-1902) in Georgetown, MA. She has three siblings: Louis Kossouth Osgood (1852-?), Stephen Carter Osgood (1854-1933), and Charles C. Osgood (1857-1922). She married Dr. Clement Cadwell Haskell (1847-1900) on September 29, 1892 and had two children: Osgood Fitz-Osborne Haskell (1895-1970) and Charlotte C Haskell (1897-?). She died on April 22, 1918. more info
A Collection of Twenty-Four (24) Baby Books or booklets collected over a 50 year period by a single collector. ..1908-1991
A Collection of Twenty-Four (24) Baby Books or booklets collected over a 50 year period by a single collector. ..1908-1991
Price: $550.00

See Word desc. and excel database. more info
Emily Hockaday Blair Henrotin et al A Collection of Correspondence of Four Generations of Women in the Hockaday, Price, Blair, and Henrotin Family, Approximately 550 Pieces. .Missouri, Illinois, & New York.185 9 - 1962
Emily Hockaday Blair Henrotin et al A Collection of Correspondence of Four Generations of Women in the Hockaday, Price, Blair, and Henrotin Family, Approximately 550 Pieces. .Missouri, Illinois, & New York.185 9 - 1962
Price: $1,750.00

A collection of correspondence from four different well-known and prominent families in the 19th and 20th centuries as they intermarried through four generations. The collection, in total, has approximately four hundred and forty (440) pieces, with the bulk of the material consisting of around three hundred and seventy-five (375) letters dating between 1870 - 1962. Over one third of the correspondence focuses on the relationships between the women in the families, often the mother-daughter, sister-sister, aunt-niece, cousin-cousin relationships. The four families are the Hockaday, Price, Blair, and Henrotin. The Hockaday family was a pioneering Missouri family, and was very prominent in Callaway County, where they were especially active in local politics. The Prices were also a pioneering Missouri family, who were often active in local politics. In particular Robert Beverly Price (1832-1924) who was a well-known banker and gentleman farmer, was greatly involved in the financial success of his alma mater, the University of Missouri. Several of the family members attended this University over the years. The Blairs were one of the most powerful political families of the 19th century advising several U.S. Presidents across the party lines including Andrew Jackson, Martin Van Buren and Abraham Lincoln. One member of the family even ran as the Vice Presidential candidate for Horatio Seymour's on the Democratic Party losing presidential ticket in 1868. The Henrotin was a prominent Chicago family, of which various family members were known for their active involvement in the suffragette movement, founding the Chicago Stock Exchange, and serving as Consuls to Belgium and Turkey. The letters deal the relationships between the women as they age they age from young children, to mothers, to widows. They discuss family news, their health, gossip, current events, their frequent trips to see other family members and month long trips to Europe. They often send each other parcels, full of gifts, such as dress, coats, gloves, (some made from seal skin), and preserved food, such as jam and pickles. In addition to the strong maternal relationships represented in the correspondence, there a strong bond between Elizabeth Hockaday and her niece, Emily Hockaday Blair Henrotin (1883-1965) as Emily would stay for long stretches of time with her Aunt when ever her parents would travel. It could be said based on the number and content of their letters that Emily felt a stronger maternal bond to her Aunt than her mother. Emily Hockaday Blair Henrotin appears to have been the family historian and the one collecting the family's letters. As such a large part of her personal correspondence with her husband, Edward "Ted" Henrotin, son, Preston Blair Henrotin, and her, mostly female, friends make up approximately one third of the correspondence in the collection. The majority of the letters from her husband take place during their courtship, while they were separated due having to take care of ailing parents in separate locations between 1906-1908. At times Edward "Ted" Henrotin would write daily to Emily. The remaining portion of the collection, approximately sixty-five (65) pieces mainly deal with the Edward and Emily's life at their house and farm called Road's End, located in Cherryplain, NY or are various pieces of ephemera relating to the greater family. There are genealogy records and family anecdotes, a printed map of Road's End, photographs, newspaper clippings, visiting cards, wedding invitations, legal documents relating to wills,  Preston Blair Henrotin's school and medical reports (including a course catalogue) and miscellaneous envelopes. The photographs, totally about twenty (20) are black and white photographs, the majority of which appear to be portraits and candid shots of the Henrotin's at Road's End. The collection itself has been organized into three categories: correspondence, photographs and ephemera (including materials relating to Road's End). Within the category of correspondence the letters have been organized into groups by who the letter is addressed to. Each of these sub set categories have been arranged chronologically with undated letters placed in back. The majority of the letters have corresponding envelopes, however there are several envelopes with no corresponding letter. These envelopes have been added to the total count in the ephemera section. Below are excerpts from the correspondence: "Mrs. Hockaday presented your case to me as best she could bit to obtain a definite account of your symptoms, I will be under the necessity of asking you some questions. Does the blood alluded to appear bright and fresh or dark? And do you discover it in large or small quantities - only a drop or two or several drops with each voidance? [sic]" - June 26, 1876, to Evaline "Eva" Hockaday Price from her nephew, Euken "Poor John, my heart reaches out to him with all a mothers love and anxiety, he looked very feeble when he left home. Dr. W & Kerr performed an operation on him for piles [hemorrhoids], he had been passing blood in considerable quantities and they took off a tumor [hemorrhoid] half finger in length which caused him to lay in bed several days, he got out of bed and started on his campaign.... I hope to live to hear that Barclay has had all the died cut off his detestable back. I firmly believe Cittendue [?] and his men are at the bottom of it all. John was awfully crushed under the malicious slander." - April 13, 1880 to Evaline Hockaday Price from her mother, Emily Mills Hockaday regarding Eva's brother John, who was Attorney General of Missouri, and campaigning for reelection when D. Robert Barclay started making accusations in the press. "I received the birthday presents together with your very kind letter on Saturday, my 78th birthday, your letter brought tears in large drops, so many kind wishes and expressions was all duly appreciated.... as we grow old we feel that a little attention and remembrance is very grateful, more so than in younger days where we had a strong arm to lean upon. Widow has always been a name of sorrow." July 9th, 1883, to Evaline "Eva" Hockaday Price from her mother, Emily Mills Hockaday "My darling little girl, your beautiful letter came a day or two ago and I think I never saw my name look so well as it did on the back of it, written by your dear little hand. You will soon write better than Aunt Liz does... I am most crazy to see you and hear you say your letters to spell, I guess you will be reading very soon, you must write to me very often, for I can read every word you write." - February 13, 1888, to Emily Hockaday Blair Henrotin from Aunt Elizabeth (sometimes referred Aunt L, Liz, Lizzie, or Lizbeth) "Your big doll sits quietly in the parlor and your Rosefelt doll is in the middle of the bed in your Mudgie's room. [Illegible name] Blair with one last night, I made one read to her, it reminds me of you just a little bit. She cannot fill your place.... I am very lonely without you. No one to sit around with me and talk to me." - May 29, 1893, to Emily Hockaday Blair Henrotin from Aunt Elizabeth "For it sounds as though you thought we had neglected you, which we are all far from feeling like doing, and I farther than anybody. I thought when you came here I would go at once to see you, but we kept hearing how weak and nervous you were, and the great necessity of keeping you quiet, and free from all excitement and the annoyance of company - and whilst I knew I would neither excite or annoy you, still knew that my being there would bring company to the house. The family would have come and of course would have to see you. To avoid all that thought I had better wait till you were well. I had felt so miserable over not going to you in the fall when you lay there a month with no one  to stay with you when I could so easily have gone had I known you were even in bed." - February 24, 1898, To Evaline "Eva" Hockaday Price from her sister, Elizabeth. "[It's] the most interesting and the hardest work imaginable. Last fall it was feeding the soldiers as they sailed, usually at four in the morning at Hoboken, NY! Which meant my getting up at two. Since November it has been meeting the steamers at seven or light. It takes one to two hours, half hour exercise, one hour to get breakfast and dress, half hour in subway, so a 7 o'clock call means up at five. We do this four days a week on a moving schedule. Lucy Taggert (from Indianapolis, lives with Florence) and I are together in this. There is no telling how long one is headed- sometimes home for lunch and back in the afternoon or no lunch and dismissed at four, or, as one day two weeks ago we were there at nine AM and worked till 11 PM. That was wonderful, it was part of the 27th. We gave them a full meal, fed 36 hundred men in 45 minutes. Such a sight to remember! We had four lines of food (about forty women), the boys marched off the ferry boat four abreast, band playing, cheering crowds outside the gates. This was at Weekhawkin, they had docked there during the day from the big boats and were then on their way to camps. We gave them coffee, a big canteen cup full, big cream buns with raising which they adore.... [letter continues on for several pages describing the meal and items given to the soldiers, and what the soldiers said to them]". - circa December 1919, to Emily Hockaday Blair Henrotin from Evalyn (friend) "I have been hoping for a letter from you telling me what you think of Blair? I do hope he is behaving well, and not tiring you out with his noise and disorder! Our house here seems so quiet with away, and stays so straight that I hardly recognize it... I am glad that he is having this first visit with you and Grandfather, that he will always remember. I have such happy recollections of the long visits I used to make you when I was a little girl, and how you used to read to me, etc. That I want want Blair to grow up with the same remembrances." - November 29, 1921 To Aunt "Lizabeth" from Emily Hockaday Blair Henrotin "E. H. B. - this is very confidential, but isn't it funny how some families are money makers and some just aren't - Now the Mulford and the Henrotin just are and I'm hoping you can manger to bring up Blair to be a Blair." April 1, 1922 to Emily Hockaday Blair Henrotin from Mrs. Frank Burroughs Mulford (friend) "The depression has hit me pretty hard, like it has everybody else, and my investments have suffered considerably. While the greater part of them is in frozen assets, which are frozen so stiff that you could not dislodge them with a pickax. My Cherryplain [New York] property ranks first amongst these frozen assets and I am very anxious to dispose of some at a almost any price as I really need the money." - March 2, 1932 to Edward "Ted" Henrotin and his wife, Emily, Hockaday Blair Henrotin from Uncle Maurice "I am working at the Embassy  in London on British matters. We are prepared for the invasion by the Nazis and I have been wondering if things get too terrific with bombs etc, whether you would be willing to have Sylvia, Robbie and I come see you at Cherryplain [New York] until the war is over." - July 2 1940, to Emily Hockaday Blair Henrotin from Jones Page Blair "You see I have the advantage on you as my so call 'dog' is part tiger, part jackal, and just a touch of Burma Rat. Not much dog to him and he's really rough. He can properly even beat you at climbing trees.... he just laughed, walked out the door and and came back dragging a baby elephant to show me how tough he really is.... news from the front has been good the last few days, We can only think of and thank the boys who have given their blood and their lives to make the news sound good and pray and hope that this mass slaughter will come to an end soon. With the fall of Rangoon, the battle for Burma is close to an end. Germany should be completely defeated by the time you receive this. The cost has been heavy." - May 4, 1945, To Auntie 'S' from Homer  who was serving in the Army Medical Corps in Burma. "Your box has arrived in perfect condition. I can't tell you how delighted I am with all the contents. You really are too generous and I do appreciate all the lovely things you have sent... the nylons are very nice. I don't get them here and have only got a pair Helen sent me from S. Africa... what a good cook you are, it is a delicious cake and the cans you have sent are all the things we like best and so is the soap. I think it is so clever of you to know what we need most. Rice is a treat after so many years without any.... we had [my husbands] brother over here for last week and he took us out on Sunday, a lovely fine day in our car for a a run. On our way home we were run into by another car. Fortunately only our car was damaged. The other car turned over and four people and two children crawled out without a scratch! There are some very bad drivers about. The shock was bad for George and he had to be revived on the roadside. However he seems none the worse now.... We heard from John who had been on leave up country visiting some army friends in Malay [Malaysia], he says the banditry is far worse than here. He had to be provided with an escort to get Kuala Lumpur and they say it may go on for another two years." -  February 25, 1949 to Emily Hockaday Blair Henrotin from Adile M. Gahain (friend) . Emily Mills was born on July 7, 1805 to John Mills (1780-1865) and Lucy Mills (1783-1867) in Kentucky, She married Judge Irvine Otey Hockaday (197-1864), on May 3, 1821. They had several children together: Lucy M Hockday VanMeter (1823-1849), Amelia Hockaday Stephens (1827-1904), Margaret Hockday McGirk (1829-1905), Elizabeth Hockday (1833-1907), and Evaline June Hockday (1833-1922). She died on May 12, 1890. Her daughter Evaline "Eva" married Robert Beverly Price (1832-1924) in 1860. She had one daughter, Florence Augustus Price (1861-1935), and several step children: Edwin Moss Price 1857-1920) and Emma Price Willis (1858-1942).  Eva died on June 22, 1922. Florence Price "Mudgie" married Francis "Farver" Preston Blair (1856-1914) in 1882, and had one child, a daughter, Emily Hockaday Blair (1883-1965). While Florence and Francis traveled, their daughter was cared for either by her grandmother, Eva, or her maternal great aunt, Elizabeth "Liz or Lizzy"  Hockaday. Emily often refers to her mother, Florence, as mudgie in her letters. Florence herself died in 1935. Emily would marry Edward "Ted" Clement Henrotin (1874-1945) in 1911 and have one child together Preston Blair Henrotin (1918-1976). Emily died in 1965. more info