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New York State Canal System; The Modern Inland Water Route Affording Economical Transportation Between the Great Lakes And the Atlantic Seaboard. January 1931.  .
New York State Canal System; The Modern Inland Water Route Affording Economical Transportation Between the Great Lakes And the Atlantic Seaboard. January 1931. .
Price: $60.00

32 pp. brochure providing a comprehensive overview of the New York state canal system with images from photographs of the construction and operation of the canals.  Also includes a map of the Barge Canal System. .  Measures 9" x 6". Light discoloration; cover only. more info
 Unused Set of Norwich to New London to Newport Round Trip Tickets. New London Steamship Co..New London, CT.[1900]
Unused Set of Norwich to New London to Newport Round Trip Tickets. New London Steamship Co..New London, CT.[1900]
Price: $60.00

A 6 5/8" x 2 3/4" card stock sheet with three perforations creating a four-part ticket for the Newport Excursion, beginning in Norwich, stopping in New London to Newport and back.  Each portion is numbered.  The reverse is blank. . more info
Jeremiah Bonsall Letter From Jeremiah Bonsall to his Father regarding his travels in Pennsylvania . .Wilkes-Barre, PA.June 17, 1849
Jeremiah Bonsall Letter From Jeremiah Bonsall to his Father regarding his travels in Pennsylvania . .Wilkes-Barre, PA.June 17, 1849
Price: $65.00

A single-fold letter sheet detailing their departure from Philadelphia on the Steamer Trenton, before switching to a stage coach and traveling along the Delaware River. They continued traveling north at at this point, using various stage coaches over several days, and passed through Tacony, Easton, Bethlehem, Allentown, Stroudsburg, Harrison, and Pittston, until reaching the town of Wilkes-Barre. The letter ends with Jeremiah's future plans for travel, where he and his brother would next head south and see White Haven, PA, and Maunch Chunk Lake before heading back to Philadelphia. Single fold sheet of paper. Folded stampless post. Measures 9 1/2" x 7 1/2" . Below are some excerpts from the letter: "We left Phila [sic] in the Steamer Trenton accompanied by a good band of music as far as Tacony... took stage for Easton, 52 miles passing along the Delaware or near it all the way. The scenery is beautiful, much resembling that of the Hudson excepting the want of improvement observable on its banks.... rode to Bethlehem passing a very rich picturesque country with a vast quantity of grain both cut & uncut in all directions. At B. we visited the graveyard, sisters house & church. From the steeple of which we obtained a good view of the country... we left for Stroudsburg, 4 miles distant in a carriage furnished by our landlord... this morning on walking through the place we came across Jesse Williams who is spending some time here... passed over the worst roads (almost if not quite) any of us had ever seen. Houses some miles apart & back on each side none at all for 8 to 12 miles for a distance of 25 miles the woods was almost unbroken.". A letter from Jeremiah to his father, Edward Horne Bonsall (1794-1879), a prominent Philadelphian business man and Quaker, detailing his journey across Pennsylvania. Jeremiah was traveling with his older brother, Spencer Bonsall (1816-1888), from Philadelphia to Wilkes-Barre, PA in June of 1849. It is unclear what the purpose of the trip was, as it could have been for either business or pleasure. Edward, Jeremiah's father, was the founder and president of the Germantown Railroad, otherwise known as the Germantown and Norristown Railroad, which was the first railroad to be built in Philadelphia in 1832. He also had an extensive real estate and conveyance business. Jeremiah was at the time of this correspondence working as a conveyancer  for his father, while his brother, Spencer, worked as a land surveyor. As such he most likely was traveling for business, and indeed there are mentions of meeting a landlord and "walking through the place". more info
 Camp Tonka'wa for Boys, Juniors and Seniors. .Chautauqua, NY.1934
Camp Tonka'wa for Boys, Juniors and Seniors. .Chautauqua, NY.1934
Price: $90.00

Camp Tonka'wa, pronounced Ton-ka-wa, was an all boys camp in upstate New York. There the boys would spend their summer camping in tents on raised wooden platforms participating in a variety of activities, such as tennis, golf, swimming, boating and canoeing, aquaplaning (a form of water-skiing), nature study, drama, horseback riding, arts and crafts, and model airplane construction. The brochure has fifteen (15) printed photographs featuring the grounds and campers at play from earlier years. At the end of the brochure there is a rip out application to Camp Tonka'wa. The camp rates are listed on the back inside cover ($150 for the whole season, $80 for a half season) as well as the additional charges for horseback riding and laundry. The camp also provided tutoring services as needed, weekly reports, and a small camp store for campers to get a few treats from. 16 pages, including illustrated wrappers. Staple binding. Measures 9 3/4" x 7". more info
 Eastman College's First Grand Excursion, On the Hudson River, Invite. Eastman College.Poughkeepsie, NY.May 18, 1878
Eastman College's First Grand Excursion, On the Hudson River, Invite. Eastman College.Poughkeepsie, NY.May 18, 1878
Price: $90.00

An invite for the Eastman College's First Grand Excursion, otherwise known as "Poughkeepsie to the Ocean" (via news articles at the time). The students were to travel on Saturday, May 18, 1878, on the steamer Mary Powell, all the way to New York City from Poughkeepsie, via the Hudson River. Along the way they were to stop at variety of locations so that the students could enjoy the "delightful and picturesque scenery of the famous Hudson, as well as its cities, villages, palatial residences and places of historic interest." Two of the specific locations to visit mentioned in the invite were West Point and the prison Sing Sing. The Eastman College Band would provide the entertainment for the students on the excursion. The college itself was first known as Eastman National Business College, and later shorted to Eastman Business School, than Eastman College, was founded in 1859 by Harvey G. Eastman (cousin to George Eastman of Kodak fame). The school eventually became affiliated with the New York Business Institute before closing in 1931. The back of the invite has a black and white engraving of the Steamer Mary Powell "passing through the famous highlands of the Hudson". Single fold. Measures 6 1/4" x 5 3/4" (folded), 11 1/2" x 6 1/4". more info
American Mail Steamships Broadside - Anchor Line "Austral" Notice to Cabin Passengers - Liverpool to New York. Henderson Brothers.London.1884
American Mail Steamships Broadside - Anchor Line "Austral" Notice to Cabin Passengers - Liverpool to New York. Henderson Brothers.London.1884
Price: $95.00

An 11" x 9 3/4" broadside with a vignette of a sailing vessel at top and the Anchor Line flag.   It is a Notice to Cabin passengers on  steamship Austral from Liverpool to New York, via Queenstown on Saturday, 17th May.  It reads "Cabin Passengers with their Luggage, will embark from the Prince's Landing Stage, by Steam Tender flying Company's Flag, at 11-30 a.m. Saturday, 17th May.  Passengers are respectfully informed that Packages of Merchandise will not be allowed to be taken on board with their Luggage, and that Freight will be charged on all over Twenty cubic feet. . more info
An Array of Notes of a Mother's trip by train Across America, c1884. ..c1884
An Array of Notes of a Mother's trip by train Across America, c1884. ..c1884
Price: $125.00

An array of snippets and pages detailing a trip a young family took by train in 1884. A mother, family, and their two young children started in Boston and headed west. They stopped in Niagara Falls, Erie Canal, Denver, Salt Lake, Price Canyon, Black Canyon, Chicago, and Washington DC.  The journal is written on a variety of papers, two (2) folded sheets, four (4) loose papers, three (3) scrap papers, and one (1) top half of a hotel letter head. . While some of the pages appear to be a journal of some sort, other were obviously notes, just written down, such as "Washington Monument 555 ft high".  Measures (Largest) 8" x 5".. Minor soiling and toning due to age. Otherwise fine. more info
Guy R. Radley & Perry O. Powell Save Our Children - Preventing Accidental Injury. Milwaukee Electric Railway & Light Co.,
Guy R. Radley & Perry O. Powell Save Our Children - Preventing Accidental Injury. Milwaukee Electric Railway & Light Co.,
Price: $125.00

Cooperating with the Milwaukee Safety Commission.Milwaukee, WI.[1923] A 32pp (unnumbered) comprehensive  booklet on safety for children, and what parents should look for both inside and outside of the home to protect their children. It begins by telling the reader that there were 65 accidental deaths of children in Milwaukee in the past year, and continues on to state that even if your child survives an accident, (s)he may "be brought home on a stretcher - perhaps crippled for life - perhaps nevermore to speak or smile." Next it takes you through a variety of scenarios on how a child may be injured. Within the house, where 40% of accidental deaths occur, there is falling, scalding, choking, burning (either via cooking or any of the various contraptions used to heat one's house) or poisoning through household cleaners and/or medicine.  Outside of the house injuries mostly involving some sort of motorized transport and risk taking, but also references drowning and falls .  Often times these photographs are accompanied by captions, such as a photograph of a group of boys playing in the street, states "Death is the price of Street Play", and on another photograph showing boys climbing and playing on industrial equipment it states "Adventurous Boys Fill Hospitals". Accompanied by several black and white illustrations of children in perilous situations and illustrations from photographs.  There are a few pages which implore parents to support funding of playgrounds where kids can play safety, though this appears to be a general appeal rather then a request for a specific fund or project. The booklet ends with nine suggestions for parents in ensure they and their children follow, such as "2- Look Both Ways, And Keep on Looking... 8 - Roller Skates are Treacherous".  Printed Wrappers. Staple binding. OCLC 0 (Apr. 2020) Photos by Brown & Rehbaum. Measures 5 1/2" x 4 1/4" To view the item, please click on the following link: https://photos.app.goo.gl/uKAd5Jy3Gs7o9dre9. Of note in the booklet are the photographs themselves which depict rather clear gender roles, as they barely feature young girls at play, but rather mostly boys. Of all the photographs, only three feature girls. The first is of a young girl running across the street after her mother failed to hold her hand. The second and third photographs are set, first depicting two girls roller skating over some trolley tracks, and the showing one of the girls after she tripped on the track and now appears as though her legs are crushed by the on coming trolley. This is also the only photograph that actually depicts an injured child. more info
George Hambrock The Translation of the Adjustment of the Average of the Clipper Ship Messenger, W. Hill. Master, on the Average from Bakers Island to Hamburg.
George Hambrock The Translation of the Adjustment of the Average of the Clipper Ship Messenger, W. Hill. Master, on the Average from Bakers Island to Hamburg.
Price: $125.00

This document is the English translation of a German document which was the "Adjustment of the Average" for the ship 'The Messenger' which was under Captain Waldo Hill (1814-1888) control and traveled from Bakers Island, MA, to Hamburg, Germany. The trip started on October 12, 1871, with the ship loaded with a cargo of 1241 tons of guano. This was not to be an easy journey, and the Messenger encountered several storms, torn sails and a constant leak in the hull on there journey across the Atlantic Ocean. This leak caused the crew to almost constantly pump excess water out of the ship in order to prevent both damage to the cargo and the ship itself. At one point in order to lessen the load approximately 40 tons of guano was dumped overboard. Eventually the ship made it to its destination, Hamburg, on March 6, 1872, and this document is the official statement of Capt. Hill on the journey over and the calculations of the sale of the cargo , the amount throw over, and repairs need on the ship. This record and calculations were done by George Hambrock, the Official Average Adjuster of the Port of Hamburg in German. The English version of the record was translated and recorded by Edward Robinson, the U. S. Consul to Hamburg from 1869 to 1876. Both his signature and seal are at the end of the document certifying that the English translations matches the original German document.

This translation of the statement is written on the letterhead for a United States Consul. It features a rendition of the Great Seal of the United States: the Bald Eagle in the center, with a ribbon in his mouth emblazoned with the text "E Pluribus Unum" (One of many/ One from many), a shield across his breast holding a olive branch and a group of arrows in his claws. This is set on a background of thirteen stars peaking out of clouds in the night sky. As for the dating of this document, it starts with "the protest made on March 12, 1872", however the document was signed by the original adjustor, George Hambrock, on April 19, 1872, and signed by the Consul, Edward Robinson, verifying the translation on April 29th, 1872. Single fold, double sided. Measures 14" x 9" (unfolded), 18" x 14" (unfolded).
more info
A Collection of Ephemera Relating to Ives Toys and Their Model Trains
A Collection of Ephemera Relating to Ives Toys and Their Model Trains
Price: $125.00

more info
The Non-fouling and Self-canting Reliance Anchor, Joseph T. Williams, Philadelphia. June 1, 1875
The Non-fouling and Self-canting Reliance Anchor, Joseph T. Williams, Philadelphia. June 1, 1875
Price: $150.00

A single-fold illustrated circular containing a narrative describing the product and the (16) Points of the Old Anchor and the Reliance Anchor Contrasted. The back page is directed at the yacht owner now having access to the best anchor. Letter folds.. more info
 Massachusetts Boatman's Meticulous Journal containing  Milage, Expenses, and Records of Trips for the Polaris, 1911-1919. F. W. Barry, Beale & Co..Boston, MA.1911
Massachusetts Boatman's Meticulous Journal containing Milage, Expenses, and Records of Trips for the Polaris, 1911-1919. F. W. Barry, Beale & Co..Boston, MA.1911
Price: $175.00

An unknown boatman's journal detailing the mileage, expenses, and trips taken on a launch (an open motor boat) named Polaris. The journal has been divided into several sections, with one side of the journal being used as a "Mileage and Cash" ledger, while the back portion is used for "Miscellaneous and Operation of Engine." These titles have been written on the journal's cover so that the reader knows which section they are on. Starting on the "Miscellaneous and Operation of Engine," the journal starts in 1911, when the boat was ordered that March. The owner visited the shop twice before the boat was delivered to him in 1911. Based on anecdotal evidence contained within other entries in the journal and advertisements in local newspapers (not included) that ran around the time of purchase, the boat was most likely constructed at the Atlantic Company in Amesbury, MA. and was a gurnet dory. What follows are various entries of advice from friends or workers at the Atlantic Co. on how to run the boat's engine and records of minor repairs. Additionally there are summaries of  the 1911-1913 seasons chronicling the time in the water, distance traveled, gallons of gas used, and repairs/maintenance.  Next, is a chart that states the distances to various points traveled to in miles. This was most likely complied in an effort to know how much gas might be need for various trips. Lastly, in this portion of the journal  is a section of pages which gives instructions on how to use the engine and perform maintenance on it. Flipping the journal over and starting on the "Milage and Cash" cover, the journal records the date of each trip take, its starting point and/or destination as well as the mileage of each trip. Often times there are notes regarding the people accompanying the owner on the trip, as well as short notes on what the trip was for, such as coon shooting or fishing. At the end of each year the total mileage is tallied up. After several blank pages a ledger for cash expenses incurred, such as an anchor and fire extinguisher. Immediately following this is a list of gasoline expenditures, including the gallons bought and  the cost. At the end of each year the total amount used has been added up, and, for example, in 1911 190 gallons costing a total of $28.10. These various  ledgers in the journal cover 4 seasons, from 1911 to 1914. At one point there are brief notes detailing the expense of storing the boat from 1915-1918, followed by the entry "Sold Polaris and tender, with fithnap and accessories, to Mrs. Anna D. Porter of 280 Lowell St. Peabody, MA, for $600. She is to pay the storage for the current year.' Following several blank pages, there are several extremely detailed records of some of the trips taken between 1911-1914. For example, on a trip from Haverhill to Annisquam (a waterfront neighborhood of the town of Gloucestor), the location of the boat was documented every ten minutes.   At times these trip entries have time stamp records to the exact 1/2 minute. Interspersed throughout the journal are four photographs that have been pasted in. Two photographs are attached to the front and back interior covers and depict the boat, Polaris, itself. There are quotes about motor boats, cut from newspapers pasted behind the photographs. The other two photographs are pasted on interior pages, one is of the lighthouse on White Island, while the other one depicts a buoy. Included are ten loose sheets, mostly lists of items left in the boat, or repairs needing to be done. Lastly there is a trimmed piece of cardboard that depicts an advertisement for the International Typographical Union, that was most likely used as a book mark. Red leather covers. Graph interior pages. Approximately 1/3 filled out. Measures 6" x 3 3/4". more info
Improved Noiseless Rowlock for the Adirondack Boat c1875 Boston.
Improved Noiseless Rowlock for the Adirondack Boat c1875 Boston.
Price: $200.00

A 10” x 8” broadside promoting Frederick D. Graves’ Improved Noiseless Rowlock with images of canoers, rowlocks in place and a close-up of the rowlock. The narrative describes the benefits of the rowlock and how it stabilized the boat and prevents the rower from “catching a crab” (capsizing). The base promotes the Adirondack Boat for Sporting Purposes. Reverse is blank. Letter folds.. more info
Rules for Building and Classification; Record of American and Foreign Shipping. American Shipmasters' Association.New York.1877
Rules for Building and Classification; Record of American and Foreign Shipping. American Shipmasters' Association.New York.1877
Price: $225.00

48 pp. Textured paper wrappers. Gilt stamp. This book details the instructions for how to survey and classify a ship according to the rules provided by the American Shipmasters' Association. The book starts with a list of resolutions and recommendations of the NY Board of Underwriters in conjunction with a list of prominent merchants that support these new regulations for the building and classifications of American shipping vessels. Each vessel must be survey and classified by an approved agent/surveyor (list provided), and a sample certificate is provided. The book continues on to detail how future construction of shipping vessels, either wood or iron, can meet these rules. There are a few blank pages at then end of the book, on one of these pages is an incomplete letter dated February 16, 1878 to a 'dear Frank'. The letter is written by an unknown individual updating Frank on the comings and goings of their friends and family. It is clear by the letter, and the talk of storms at sea, that Frank is a sailor of some kind. The front cover features a gilded stamp design of end eagle holding an anchor on a rock with a ship a full sail in the background. Surrounding this design is a decorative border of rope with an anchor in each corner. Measures 8 3/4" x 7 1/2". more info
 Peoples Ferry Company Circular. Peoples Ferry Company.Boston, MA.1853
Peoples Ferry Company Circular. Peoples Ferry Company.Boston, MA.1853
Price: $225.00

A circular sent out to the stockholders of the Peoples Ferry Company on October 10, 1853. The company was a city subsidized ferry transportation for Boston Harbor, between East Boston and Boston. This circular was sent out to inform the stockholders of possible changes to their by-laws which could be voted on at a meeting on October 28, 1853. The company itself did not prove profitable and even with help from the city of Boston, was forced to liquidated in 1868. On the back it is inscribed "Certificate of Shares in Peoples Ferry Co., August 3rd, 1854" Single fold. Measures 10" x 7 3/4" (folded) 15" x 10" (unfolded). more info
Dr. Bulter Wilmarth  A Letter between Two Doctors about working together at a Sanitarium and the Use of Homeopathic Medicines. .Lowell, MA.September 26, 1849
Dr. Bulter Wilmarth A Letter between Two Doctors about working together at a Sanitarium and the Use of Homeopathic Medicines. .Lowell, MA.September 26, 1849
Price: $225.00

Stampless post. A letter between two doctors, Dr. Bulter Wilmarth and Dr. John Hero that discussing the various patients at a local sanitarium in Lowell, MA, that Wilmarth is treating. There is also some talk about the possibility of the pair working together, either at the current sanitarium or purchasing a sanitarium together elsewhere. This idea for the men to buy and run a sanitarium together does not appear to be a new one, but rather one that they have been kicking around for a while. Dr. Butler Wilmarth seems to be temporarily working at the sanitarium in Lowell, it is unclear if he was asked for fill in for a doctor there and heard about the possible sale of the sanitarium or if he is there as a potential buyer and decided to take on some work there to see if he like it. One thing is clear, that while it appears as though Dr. Wilmarth has respect for the "water cures", other homeopathic remedies are not to his liking, even as he does his best to learn about them and treat patients using them. The two doctors, Wilmarth and Hero, were friends that had first established their relationship as a mentor-student bond when Hero was studying medicine under Wilmarth. The two did not purchase the sanitarium discussed in the letter, but a few years later, in 1851, they would purchase one in Westboro, MA. Below are some quotes from the letter: "But I am in quite an interesting and instructive school myself and I wish you was here to share a part in the labor and responsibleness of the institution.  Here is considerable head-work to do, I assure you - I have about all sorts of diseases and dispositions to deal with and need much wisdom as well as some patience to get along with so many crooked patients, bathmen [sic], cooks, waiters, &c. I have been able to keep things pretty straight yet. We have 28 patients now. Some are doing well, some stationary some growing worse if any thing. It is no small task to answer all their questions, explain all their difficulties, and encourage them to hope and persevere. Some of the are quite homeopathic and want to be swallowing pellets and powders. Dr. Foster has lots of homeopathic medicine, so I give a little hurf [also known as cress or lepidium sativum], and coffea [coffea cruda] and bell [belladonna?] and hyos [hyoscyamus niger] and bryonia and mercurius. But for my life, I can't tell whether it does any good or not." "I hope to return in about 2 weeks, and that cant make a thousand dollars difference with the cold hearted owner. I think - if it does - let it go to the first bidder. There are more places in N.E. (New England) than Grapton or Worchester or even Milford.... It is some expected Dr. Tortes will leave here. I have been invited by the owner to hire, or buy, this their stand in such an event. Here everything is ready, furniture and all for operations. Never fear (if the Lord will) we will do something next season some where." . Dr. Butler Wilmarth was born on December 18, 1798 in Montague, MA to Peggy Coleman. He was an illegitimate child, and while his biological father was never named, Butler believed that he was a man of some note in town. In 1802 he was bound out to town selectman Amos Wilmarth of Rowe, who would eventually adopt him, and Butler would take his name. He began studying medicine at the age of 23 under the tutelage of Dr. William F. Selden. On March 1, 1831 he married Phila Osgood (1806-1859). Together they had two children: Jerome Terome Wilmarth (1831-?) and Phila Wilmarth Weston (1841-1903). In 1841 he would become a convert to hydropathic remedies, after he himself fell it and was cured by such treatments. He worked and established a variety of different bath houses in Massachusetts and New York before establishing one with a former student of his, J. H. Hero in Westboro, MA. In 1851 he was elected President of the Hydropathic Association of Physicians and Surgeons. On May 6, 1853, while returning from the association's annual meeting, the train he was on suffered a catastrophic collision at the Norwalk Bridge in CT. Wilmarth and over forty-five others would perish in the train accident, which is considered to be the first major US railroad disaster. . John Henry Hero  was born on December 30, 1820 to John Hero (1787-1861) and Polly Claffin (1791-1832) in Milford, MA. He had several siblings: Susannah H. Hero (1811-?),  Horace B. Hero (1812-?) Eliza H Hero (1814-1867), Hannah H Hero (1817-?), Izanna Chamberlain Hero (1823-1914), and Edwin H Hero (1831-?). He married Irene Morse Parkhurst (1822-1906) on September 22, 1850. They had three children: Butler Wilmarth Hero (1859 -1932) who was named after John's friend, mentor, and business partner, George Hoyt Hero (1861-1933), and John P. Hero (1863-1865). John studied medicine with Dr. Butler Wilmarth of Hopedale and graduated from Central Medical College in Syracuse, NY. Him and Wilmarth formed a strong mentorship bond that, in 1852, resulted in him and Wilmarth going into business with one another in Westboro by opening a bath house. In 1853, after Wilmarth's death, Hero would become the sole owner. On January 6, 1898 John would die of heart disease, which was a complication of his stomach cancer. more info
 Waters’ Patent Improved Paper Boats for Racing, Exercise, Pleasure, Shooting, Fishing & Traveling. .Troy, NY.1875
Waters’ Patent Improved Paper Boats for Racing, Exercise, Pleasure, Shooting, Fishing & Traveling. .Troy, NY.1875
Price: $275.00

Waters’ Patent Improved Paper Boats for Racing, Exercise, Pleasure, Shooting, Fishing & Traveling. E. Waters & Sons, Sole Builders, Troy N.Y. c1875. Illustrations and brief description and pricing information on the Adirondack Gig, 14 Ft. Gig, Ladies’ Gig with two views, Dingey, New York Working Boat, Stannard Skiffs with three views, Rob Roy Canoe, Baden Powell Canoe and the Indian Canoe. Letter folds, light discoloration at base. Minimal wear.  . more info
A Collection of Seventy-One (71) Photographs From A Grand World Tour
A Collection of Seventy-One (71) Photographs From A Grand World Tour
Price: $275.00

A collection of seventy-one (71) black and white photographs of a Grand World Tour that went from America to Asia, the Middle East, Northern African, and Europe. The collection is dated to circa 1934-1935 as there are several pictures of the Sky Ride Towers, a ride at the 1933-1934 Chicago World's Fair, A Century of Progress. As there are little to no crowds in the photographs, they were most likely taken after the fair ended in October 1934 but prior to when the towers were demolished in August of 1935. A young man was traveling, based on captions identified as "myself" in the photographs. Most of the locations and people in the photographs have been identified on the back. The tour appears to have started in Chicago, IL, where a train was then taken Northwest, though Minneapolis to Glacier National Park in Montana, over the Rockies and to Seattle. There are fourteen (14) photographs from this portion of the trip, most from the train ride though the Rockies. From Seattle, he boarded the a ship call Heian Maru and sailed passed Vancouver on his way to Japan. There are eight (8) photographs (including two duplicates) from his time in Japan, of note are: The Great Buddha from Kamakura (where according to the description on the back there was a sign that says "No Photographing", which was obviously ignored), Hachiman Shrine in Kamakura, and the Imperial Palace in Tokyo. It is here that the exact route taken for the rest of the trip becomes unclear. Based on the information on the back of the photographs, he boarded another NYK Ocean Liner named the Hakozaki Manu (launched in 1922 and sunk in 1945 during WWII). There are two (2) photographs of his time on this ship. He toured other parts of Asia, such as China, Hong Kong, Philippines, Vietnam, and Singapore, before heading to the Middle East and Northern Africa. It is unknown if he took the Hakozaki Maru the whole way, or switched to another ship. For example, there is one (1) photograph in the collection of a group of three people on the "Grant", which may or may not be the SS President Grant (originally known as the Pine Tree State, and later renamed the USS Harris during WWII) which was an ocean liner that in the 1930s operated in the 'orient' first for the American Orient Lines and later the American Mail Lines.

However the exact routes the ship serviced were unable to be identified. There are nine (9) photographs from his time in Asia, of note are: Hong Kong Harbor, University of Santo Tomas and the Santa Clara Convent in Manila, Saigon Notre Dame Cathedral, and the Singapore Harbor. Side note: There is one unidentified photograph included in this grouping that is most likely of Hong Kong, but that is unverified. As he continued on his journey he stopped in Sri Lanka, and there are two (2) photographs of Colombo, the largest city in Sri Lanka. From there he stopped briefly in Yemen, taking one (1) photograph of the Cisterns of Tawila, otherwise known as the Tawila Tanks in Aden, Yemen. He crossed through the Red Sea to the Mediterranean Sea, mostly likely through the Suez Canal, but the only photograph in the collection from this portion of the trip: it is a single (1) photograph of him on the bow of the ship in the middle of the Red Sea at noon with a young boy. There are five (5) photographs of his time in Egypt with the Great Pyramids and the Sphinx. After Egypt, he most likely sailed across the Mediterranean Sea to Italy, more specially Pompeii, where there are two (2) photographs of him in the ruins of Pompeii. He then passed through the Strait of Gibraltar, proven by two (2) photographs in the collection, one of the Rock of Gibraltar and the other from inside the Spanish section of the town of Gibraltar itself. Next stop was France, where he spent some time in Paris, Marseille, and Rouen. There are six (6) photographs of his time in France, of note: Notre Dame, Place de la Concorde, and the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, and the Gros Horloge and the site of Joan of Arc's execution in Rouen. The last stop on his journey was England, where he went to London and Winchester. There are five (5) photographs from his time in England including Westminster Abbey, Whitehall, and Winchester College and its War Cloister (a war memorial). He traveled home to America on the RMS Berengaria, mostly like to New York City. The Berengaria was an ocean liner built and launched as the Imperator in 1913 by the Hambur-Amerika Line. She was given to England as reparation for the sinking of the Lusitania and sold to the Cunard Line (who merged with the White Star Line in 1934) and renamed the Berengaria. She served as a transatlantic ocean liner sailing between Southampton, England and New York until she caught fire in 1938 and was shortly thereafter scrapped. There are two (2) photographs the collection of the journey on the Berengaria, one of her deck, and the other of a boxing match taking place for entertainment. The photographs themselves come in an official envelope from the developers, Gloeckner & Newby Company in New York, NY. Measures 4 1/2" x 2" (photographs), 6 3/4" x 4 1/2" (envelope).
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A Manuscript, Watercolor, Pen and ink Work - A Book of Ships. ..c1928
A Manuscript, Watercolor, Pen and ink Work - A Book of Ships. ..c1928
Price: $575.00

A hand crafted paper book with 24 leaves. It includes 10 watercolors of ships throughout the ages from the first log canoe to a 1920s passenger liner. Each full page watercolor is accompanied by an informational narrative. The center of the book includes a center-fold of a printed illustration by Charles S. J> Delacy - Section of the 'Revenge'. more info
Emma S. Doughten Emma S. Doughten's European Trip, April 1901 - September 1902. ..
Emma S. Doughten Emma S. Doughten's European Trip, April 1901 - September 1902. ..
Price: $750.00

Presented in two albums, the travels of an unaccompanied female on a European tour. In early 1901 Emma Doughten began her European Tour, traveling mostly by rail, she visited numerous countries, such as Spain, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Italy, France, England and Scotland. Emma narrates every portion of her trip with exacting, detailed, entries of the sites she sees and the people she meets. From the extolling on the history of each art piece, cathedral, palace, or chateau she visited to her interactions with fellow travelers or the townsfolk she met. Often, she would spend pages writing all she learned while visiting the historic site of the day. Along with her written journal entries, in order to illustrate the numerous sites visited, are pasted-in postcards. From the view of the Louvre from across the Seine in Paris to the various small towns she visited in the high Alps in Switzerland.

Starting her journey in Spain, she visited various locations, such as Ibiza and Gibraltar. Continuing on to Austria she visited Innsbruck and Vienna and saw such sites as the Hofburg Imperial Palace and the Tyrolean State Museum. A short train ride later she spent some time Germany visiting the various sights in Munich and Dresden. Making her way to Switzerland and she traveled on the Axenstrasse Highway, a picturesque road built along steep cliffs on the east side of the Lake Lucerne. The views along this throughway are spectacular as it weaves through the many rock fall galleries and tunnels along its route. From there Emma traveled on the Gotthard Railway, a Swiss trans-alpine railway that runs from northern Switzerland all the way to the country's boarder with Italy. The railroad takes its passengers through the Alps by means of the Gotthard Tunnel, making several stops along the way to the tourist towns that are scattered throughout the Alps. Along the way, Emma also saw the Rhonegletscher (otherwise known as the Rhone Glacier, located in the Swiss Alps and is the source of the Rhône River and one of the primary contributors to Lake Geneva), Le Pont Suspendu (a large suspension bridge which at its inauguration in 1834, it became, for a time, the longest suspension bridge in the world, as well as one of the first to use wireline cables instead of chains. It was destroyed in 1923 to make way for the Zaehringen bridge.), and Matterhorn (a mountain of the Alps, straddling the main watershed and border between Switzerland and Italy, it's a huge and near-symmetrical pyramidal peak and it is one of the highest summits in the Alps and Europe).

Eventually making her way into Italy, Emma spent some time along Lake Maggiore; a long, thin, lake on the south side of the Alps that is noted for its picturesque surroundings of greenery-filled mountains, before traveling on to some of the more well-known Italian tourist destinations. Such as Milan, Florence, Sienna, Rome, Assisi, and Pompeii. One lesser known spot Emma visited was Bussana Vecchia, a ghost town in Liguria, Italy, that had been abandoned by its citizens due to an earthquake in 1887.

From there she continued onto France, stopping in Paris and visiting all the classic sites: The Louvre, The Vendome Column, Notre Dame, The Arc de Triumph, Place Charles de Gaulle, and Saint-Jacques Tower. Leaving Paris, Emma visited almost too many French Chateaux to be named, though some highlights are the Chateau de Cheverny, the royal Château de Chambord, and the royal Château de Blois. Emma continued on through the coast of Brittany and Normandy visiting such sites as the Carnac stones (an exceptionally dense collection of megalithic sites around the village of Carnac in Brittany), and Mont-Saint-Michel (an island fort that houses several strategic fortifications since ancient times).

Using the French port city of Calais, Emma traveled across the English Channel to the cliff top town of Dover. There she started her last leg of her journey, exploring the British Isles. Traveling north through England, she visited London, Canterbury, Oxford, and Salisbury. Additionally, she spent some time at Stonehenge, Shakespeare's birthplace and Land's End (found along the coast of Cornwall, it is the most westerly point of mainland England). From there she moved onto Scotland, where she spent time visiting various lochs and their nearby towns and castles. Such as Dunstaffnage Castle by Loch Etive, Stirling Castle near Stirling City, and Durham Castle in Durham. Additionally, she also spent some time in Edinburgh and Linlithgow.

Here the journal rather abruptly ends, with no real conclusion or statement how Emma traveled home. Additionally, on the last 20 or so pages of the journal Emma has left several blank sections were she obviously meant to go back and paste in the postcards of the sites she was describing but never got around to it. However, placed in-between pages of the journal, there are two envelopes full of postcards from England and Scotland, that she most likely meant to use. Additionally, the beginning of her trip is also a bit of a mystery. The first journal's binding is damaged and it looks as though several pages at the beginning are missing. As Emma made a point of recording on the inside cover of both journals where she was when she started them and the date, one is able to confirm that she started in Gibraltar.

Overall, these journals provide an amazing insight into the popular 'European Tour' at the very beginning of the 20th century.
To view this collection, please click on the following link: https://goo.gl/photos/D3imq9fr2z6YSUuF8. his collection consists of two journals.

The first journals' shows heavy cover wear. The front cover is detached and the back strip is missing. It appears that the first few pages of the journal are missing. Some additional pages are loose or detached. The second journal covers also show moderate cover wear. The back strip is partially detached and the binding is loose by intact, though some individual pages are fully detached from the binding. Both journals are mostly written in pen, though the first few pages of the first journal are written in pencil, and therefore is had to read in places. Additionally, there are some stains in both journals due to the paste and/or tape used to adhere the postcards.
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George Clement Lord A Collection of 21 Letters belonging the  Lord's Family Shipping Company. .Kennebunk, ME and Boston, MA.1836-1861
George Clement Lord A Collection of 21 Letters belonging the Lord's Family Shipping Company. .Kennebunk, ME and Boston, MA.1836-1861
Price: $1,500.00

A collection of twenty-one (21) letters belonging to the Lord Family of Kennebunk, ME, mostly regarding their shipping company, which was also based in Boston, MA. The letters date from 1836 to 1861, and are mostly addressed to George C. Lord. Though a few of the letters are from employees or customers of the company the majority are from family members involved in the business. These members (and their relationship to George) are: his father, Captain George Lord, his brothers Edward W Lord and Charles Edward Lord, and later, his son, Charles E. Lord. A variety of shipping business subjects are covered in the letters, such as the types of cargo and their value (some goods mentioned are cotton, tallow, logwood, salt, railway supplies, and coal), several legal cases for the settlement of claims due to cargo loss, the sale of ships, insurance policies on the ships and cargo, various ship Captains employed by them, ship routes, and the various political policies that effect the shipping business such as the Letters of Marque issued by Confederate President Jefferson Davis that effectively sanctioned piracy as legal. Some of the ships mentioned in the letters are: ‘International', 'Josephine', 'G. W. Brown', 'Rigulator', 'Crimea', 'Golden Eagle', 'Hayes', 'Royal', and 'York'. The names of the ships owned by the company often reflect the names of family members or past favored employees. Also discussed are various family matters, such as relatives' health or present life. One letter from a customer discusses the transport of 'fleshpots of Egypt', which could alternatively mean either actual pots of meat or prostitutes. While in the end the author does seem to be referring to actual meat, the terminology he uses prior to that is more than slightly ambiguous. The last two letters in the collection are from 1861, on the eve of the American Civil War and discusses the author's, Charles E. Lord, displeasure at the hypocrisy of the North who no longer want a war when it hits them in their pocket books, as well as the effect the war is having on the shipping business. Four of the letters come with corresponding envelopes, however the majority of the letters were folded paper with stampless post. The collection is arranged chronologically, one letter is missing a date. Below are some excerpts from the letters:

"Thirdly your sympathy and sorrow expressed for my having had to pay twice the 3-9 to the port to look after the fleshpots of Egypt I thank you for. But surely you who no doubt go nightly and perhaps daily down into that very Montezuma of Egypt enjoying and all the luxuries of that balmy, soft, and delicious land - ought not to chasten a poor old fellow who can no longer journey there and can only now enjoy the remembrance of the part by scenting fleshpots of that magical country in the shape of a thigh of pork."
-  Daniel Nason to George C. Lord, December 2, 1847

"Please ask father to write us how much insurance they will want on the Wm Brown, we will cancel present policies and take out new ones for the voyage. Present policies expire Dec 1st - should think $36000 on the ship and either 10 or 15000 on charter out. They must bear in mind that the commission on the homeward charter are to be paid lost or not safe - say $1500(sic) perhaps $12000 on charter would be enough. No news here. we notice the Henry Mann seen Aug 31 - Lat. 28 South of the Island of Madagascar, then out 70 days - at that rate she would not be in Rotterdam before Christmas - but we hope to hear of her at Falmouth by the steamer due tomorrow morning."
- George C Lord to his brother Edward W. Lord, September 1, 1852.

"In regards to business affairs I have nothing, I am sorry to say, very interesting or cheering to relate. The 'International' is in Dock discharging- has her between docks now about clear. While she was laying in the river they were obliged to keep one pump going most of the time to keep her free of water and when at sea in rough weather both, but since she has been in Dock, she leaks but very little - say one to two inches per hour.... Political affairs in the United States seem to have assumed a more peaceful aspect and yet as to the future we are as much in the dark as ever. I am sorry to see that the passage of the Tariff Bill has caused a great change in the minds of the people here - their sympathies seem to have made a complete change from the North to the South. It is very easy to see how deep seated their philanthropy is for the poor downtrodden slave when their own interests are at all encroached upon. I think the change in the Tariff just at this time was a very unwise thing with the North and one which will fail to have its desired effect. It will operate against the commercial interests of the North and be of no benefit to the manufacturing interest. Foreign merchandise with fine it way into the country through the Southern ports and Canada without paying the high duty and that the whole object of the tariff will be frustrated. Therefore in my opinion, if the new administration wish to save their 'credit and bacon', they had better abandon the Tariff scheme at once and look to some other source of revenue."
- Charles E. Lord to his father, George C. Lord, April 2, 1861

"The truly deplorable state of the anarchy which our one peaceful and happy country is now in makes all news coming from there of thrilling interest, though saddening to the hear to contemplate. It is comforting to now that the people of the North are so united and that party lines are so completely obliterated. If war must come I hope the President will bring all the resources of the country into the field and make on bold strike at the Rebels. It is too late now for any half way measures. they have desperate men to deal with and desperate measures must be used to put them down or the country is lost and ruined further... The underwriters at large are now asking from 1% to 10 % additional premium on cargo in American ships, depending upon their position or account of the Letters of Marque issued by Jeff Davis. "
- Charles E. Lord to his father, George C. Lord, May 4, 1861
George Clement Lord was born about 1823 in Kennebunk, Maine to Captain George Lord (1791-1861) and Olive Jefferds (1793-1879). He had five siblings: Hannah Elizabeth Lord (1817-1833), Lucy Hayes Lord (1818-1833), Olive Jeffords Lord (1821-1821-1829), Charles Howard Lord (1825-1892) and Edward W. Lord (1830-1903). He married his cousin, Marion Ruthven Watterson (1823-1910) in 1866. They had four children together: Robert Waterson Lord (1847-1908), Marion Ruthven Lord (1849-1910), Caroline Lucy Lord (1852-1859), and Charles Edward Lord (1858-1941).  George Lord does on February 23, 1893.

His son, Charles. is also involved in the shipping business. Charles marries Effie Marion Rogers (1860-?) in 1855 and they have three children together: George C. Lord (1890-?), Marian Watterston Lord (1892-?), and Charles R. Lord (1893-?). He dies on August 1, 1941. He most likely died in August 1978.
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