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Cromwell Gardens Seed Catalog
Cromwell Gardens Seed Catalog
Price: $25.00

Manufacturer: An. N Person Inc Location: Cromwell, CT Date: 1924 Pages: 68 Subject Matter: Garden Full color covers, with comprehensive description, cultural and pricing information, images from photographs in B&W with periodic full color. There is a tear away order sheet in the back. Partially cover separation, and toning. 10"x7". more info
Garbison's Kentucky Saddle Horses
Garbison's Kentucky Saddle Horses
Price: $50.00

Manufacturer: S. T. Harbison & Co. Location: Lexington, KY Date: November 28, 1911 Pages: 20 Subject Matter: Horse Auction A total of 16 lots of horses to be sold at auction at the Durland Riding Academy in Central Park, New York. All of the lots include the horse's name, sex, age, and size along with an owner's statement, eight of the lots include a B&W photograph. The book has been annotated with the prices each horse sold for, which ones were bought by the original owner of the catalogue, and handwritten information regarding a 'lot 17' that must have been a last minute entry into the auction. The note also lists the price that horse sold for. A small newspaper clipping is also present, for the Paradise Farm in Teaneck, NJ. Covers are semi faded due to light damage, and the back covers have a few small stains on it. Additionally the catalog was folded in half at some point. The second to last page has some intact tears that have folded over. 9" x 5 3/4" more info
 Horse Drawn Parade Float - Harvest Festival - Flora, Ceres, Pomona. .Raymond, NH.1914
Horse Drawn Parade Float - Harvest Festival - Flora, Ceres, Pomona. .Raymond, NH.1914
Price: $65.00

Black and white photograph on brown mount. Depicts women standing on a parade float, being pulled by two horses: float consists of a large cart, draped in white fabric, with 16 women and their driver on board. All of the women are wearing white dresses, and there is a sign attached to the back of the cart that reads "Flora, Ceres, Pomona" - likely a reference to their local Grange Society's positions with the same name. "Novelty Photo For Duplicates, E. Hayes, Beverly Mass."  is stamped on the backing. 12" x 10" -  8" x 6" photograph . more info
T. E. Cowart A Texan Farmer's Letter to his Mother - difficulty of farming in down pours and wind - difficult conditions.... .Lockney, TX.5054
T. E. Cowart A Texan Farmer's Letter to his Mother - difficulty of farming in down pours and wind - difficult conditions.... .Lockney, TX.5054
Price: $85.00

A long letter from Tucker E. Cowart, a Texan farmer, written over the course of a month to his mother, Amelia in Bonham, TX. The letter provides an update on Tucker's life, family and farm. It is also clear that even though his mother lives in Bonham, some 350 miles away from Tucker in Lockney, some of the land Tucker is farming does belong to to her. Due to the unseasonable dry summer and wet fall, Tucker has been having problems with his various crops, and portions of this letter reflect his anxiety of this. During the course of the year Tucker has planted several types of corn, wheat, and oats. Additionally, there appears to be a possible land dispute with one of their neighbors (who was loaned a portion of the Tucker's land in years prior), and Tucker seems to be considering hiring the town's land surveyor in order to make sure he is actually remembering the boundaries of their land. The letter itself is three double sided pages and a corresponding envelope. Below is are several excerpts from the letter: "It has been trying to rain for about a wk. Rained about all night last night. We didn't need it. We have had plenty of rain this fall, none in the summer. Crops are short, crops are good in some localities. No good crops right close around here. Planted 31 acres of kaffir corn, 15 acres of maize, 8 acres of wheat, 15 acres of oats on your end of the field. Kaffir didn't head, from knee high to waist high. I cut it, made good many bundles. Few heads in the maize. Staid [sic] dry to [sic] long for anything. Your wheat and oats didn't grow at all. No season. I plowed it all up, cultivated the land all summer kept it clear, sowed it in wheat this fall to a very good stand." "We had some windy weather last wk. The wind blew hard from the north, blowed [sic] all the cotton out. A man south west of us had about 40 or 50 acres of cotton. The fellow west of us had about 400 acres of Russian Thistles. The wind broke them all off, they rolled up against his fence, tore it down. Rolled on across the dutchman's cotton patch. The thistles have little thorns on them. The cotton stuck to them. They kept rolling. I guess they are down about Big Springs now at the speed they were going, cotton and all. The Thistles are getting to be a sight in the country." "The children seem to keep very well. They put on their shoes since it got cool. Farris feet are so rusty - he is getting uneasy about them. He thinks he is turning to a negro, the rust won't come off. Lucy is well and hearty, she has gone visiting the sick. This aft [sic] left the Indians here with me, they are making lots of racket.". Turner E. Cowart was born on January 15, 1870 to Alexander Johnston Cowart (1845-1908) and Amelia L. Lovelace (1850-1930) in Texas. He had several siblings: Wilsie B. Cowart (1872-1873), Annie Maud Cowart (1873-1899), Arlie Robert Cowart (1874-1899), Mack D. Cowart (1876-1964), Bruce W. Cowart (1880-1894), John C. Cowart (1882-1909), Lottie Mae Cowart (1886-1962), William Edgar Cowart (1890-1874), Thomas Roscoe Cowart (1890-1988) and Amelia Elizabeth Cowart Ragland (1895-1925). He married Lucy E. Hartman (1890-1977) on October 30, 1907 and had two children together: Farris E. Cowart (1909-1984) and Juanita Elizabeth Cowart Drake (1910-1973).  Turner had moved to Lockney, TX in or around 1905 and farmed on his land there until 1956, when he moved to Plainview, TX. He died shortly thereafter on January 5, 1958 in Hale, Texas of a heart ailment. more info
C.D. Van Allen Van Allen's Common Sense Churn Transfer of Patent. .Syracuse, NY.July 23, 1861
C.D. Van Allen Van Allen's Common Sense Churn Transfer of Patent. .Syracuse, NY.July 23, 1861
Price: $95.00

A transfer of patent certificate for the Common Sense [Butter] Churn. The churn was invented by C. D. Van Allen and patented by him in July 1861 with an O.B. Cowles purchasing shares in it at that time. This certificate is represents when Van Allen transfer his share and ownership of his invention to Jefe M. Sharp of Roxbury, NJ, in November 1861. At the bottom of the certificate it states that the It was received by the US Patent Office on November 30, 1861 and entered into their "Transfer of Patent" files. Reverse is blank.  Measures 13 1/2" x 8 1/2". more info
 Sand Toy for Grands Magasings Du Printemps. .Paris, France.1890s
Sand Toy for Grands Magasings Du Printemps. .Paris, France.1890s
Price: $95.00

This paper toy depicts a woman on one side milking her cow and a little girl drinking milk at the table on the other side. Both the little girl's glass of milk and the stream of milk produced by the cow are tissue paper with a capsule of sand behind it. This means that as you turn the postcard over, the sand gives the illusion of milk gushing from  the cow's utter into the pail on one side, and the milk disappearing from the glass as the girl drinks it on the other side. The toy was sold by Printemps, a French department store, sometimes called Grands Magasings Du Printemps, with 'Grands Magasings' (translates to big store) being the class of store it was. The store focused on beauty, lifestyle, fashion, accessories and men's wear. It was founded in 1865 by Jules Jaluzot and Jean-Alfred Duclos. Printemps is credited with revolutionized retail business practices as they marked their goods with set prices rather than the haggling style (that started the price based on the customer's appearance) that was predominate at the time. The store is still open today. The product itself was made in Japan. Measures 4 3/4" x 3 1/4". more info
Commercial And Industrial Association Montgomery, Alabama: A Guide to its History, Landmarks, Industry, and Culture. Brown Printing Company.Montgomery, Alabama.c1900
Commercial And Industrial Association Montgomery, Alabama: A Guide to its History, Landmarks, Industry, and Culture. Brown Printing Company.Montgomery, Alabama.c1900
Price: $95.00

36 pp, staple booklet. This short book details the history, people  and culture of Montgomery, the capital of Alabama. The book starts off briefly describing the city's location, population, health, water supply and climate. Next it continues onto several landmarks of the city, such as the local schools, Carnegie Library and local hospital, providing a brief description and photograph of each. The book continues on to describe the agricultural and industry found in Montgomery, claiming that Montgomery "is the center or one of the richest agricultural sections of the United States and offers the greatest inducements, not only to the planter of cotton, corn, hay, rice, sugar cane, etc., but also to the general farmer, the truck gardener, the fruit grower and stock raiser..." and that "any factory employing for raw material, cotton, cotton, seed, coal , iron, clay, hard woods, pine, leather, hides, vegetables, or fruits, will do will to locate in Montgomery." The latter half of the booklet is full of advertisements from local businesses such as the 'Virginia-Carolina Chemical Company', 'Winter, Loeb & Co. Wholesale Grocers', 'Alabama Cotton Oil Company', and 'Union Trust and Savings Company'. The book contains over twenty images (not including those used in advertisements) of Montgomery, AL. Measures 9" x 4".. more info
 A Circular for 69,000 Acres Farming Land, Securing $20,000, 6 per Ct. 30- Year Bonds. Bank of Warsaw.Lyon County, KS.[1885]
A Circular for 69,000 Acres Farming Land, Securing $20,000, 6 per Ct. 30- Year Bonds. Bank of Warsaw.Lyon County, KS.[1885]
Price: $100.00

A circular advertising the sale of bonds for farmland in Lyon County in Kansas.  The circular promoted the desirability of the land by emphasizing how close it was to several important railroads, such as Missouri Pacific R. R. and the Atchinson, Topeka & Santa Fe R. R., as well as the low debt the township itself carried (meaning taxes would be low). The back of the circular provides information on the laws that detail how a bond can be issued and how the state of Kansas ensures the legality of the bonds. Single page, double sided. Measures 10" x 6 1/4".. There was around 69,000 acres available in Agnes City Township, which was located 30 miles southwest of Topeka, KS. Each bond was issued with 6 percent interest over 30 years and was financed by the Bank of Warsaw, located in Warsaw, NY. more info
Class of 1917 Initial Instruction for Infants or The Babies' Botany Book, A Grind Book from Smith College. Smith College.Northampton, MA.1914
Class of 1917 Initial Instruction for Infants or The Babies' Botany Book, A Grind Book from Smith College. Smith College.Northampton, MA.1914
Price: $110.00

8 pg., staple booklet. A humor filled book, which appears on first glance to be a baby book on botany. However upon closer inspection, one realize that the book has noting to do with botany. It is actually a 'Grinds' Book from Smith College, a women's college in Northampton, MA. These 'Grind Book's, also called Freshman Grinds, were created as a result of a long-standing competition that has existed between the First Year (Freshman) students and the Second Year (Sophomore) students, and were printed and placed either on the doorsteps or in the mailboxes of incoming Freshman. These books were often full of humor, poking fun at the incoming class, such as when the Class of 1908 produced a take-off of modern baby books, entitled "Babies Own Journal", which offered instructions on how to keep the baby member of the Class of 1909 happy, health, and clean. The Freshman class was often referred to as 'babies' as they knew nothing about campus or college life, and the Grinds often reflected that idea. "The Babies Botany Book", die cut to be shaped like a baby sucking a bottle and holding a doll, also reflects this idea, and includes five poems instructing the 'baby' reader on the various times of 'specimens' found. In this case they are referring to five of the stereotypical personalities of young incoming Freshmen. The poems are titled Grind-ia Greasi-ma (a Book Worm), Athlet-a Long Legorum (the athlete with long legs), Fusser Blushiorum (a flirty girl), Freshman-a Weepiosa (a homesick freshman), and Rusher Constant-a (an overachiever). Along with each poem is a black and white lined drawing. These drawings are also humorous in nature, for example the poem about the Athlete, depicts a girl's head with a long braid acting as the center of a flower and its stem, surrounding by basketballs representing the flower petals. Below is one of the poems found within this book. "This 'red-eyed-Susan' does not grow Where 'black-eyed-Susans' do, Nor is its color --A melancholy 'blue'; You'll find that early in the Fall It's everywhere about; 'Tis watered most by tears. But Time Can always Weed it out And for this flower to droop its head Is natural, must be granted: 'Tis torn from its own native soil, And is, of course, transplanted."    - Freshman-a Weepiosa Another funny bit to this book is the inscription which reads: "A collection of typical specimens weeded from the abundant growth of the year 1918, by 17 Botanists." Measures 8" x 4 3/4". more info
 The Time is Now, Project Rural Conference. NAACP.Raleigh, NC.December 14-15, 1979
The Time is Now, Project Rural Conference. NAACP.Raleigh, NC.December 14-15, 1979
Price: $125.00

A card stock poster from a 1979 conference, hosted at the Sheraton Crabtree Hotel in Raleigh, NC. The slogan for the conference was "The Time is Now" and the poster features an illustration of a African American man holding a pitch fork standing in his fields, surrounded by chickens. In the distance there another individual, which based on the head-ware may have been intended to be a woman, riding on a tractor plowing a field. Below the illustration are the dates for the conference. The text and illustration are printed in blue. Measures 15" x 11 1/2". Project Rural was an initiative developed by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) with the goal to educate black Americans in the need for retaining possession of their land. Project Rural was an acronym for Retention, Utilization, Revitalization, and Acquisition of Land, and developed in the 1970s, its aim was to address the starling static that black Americans had lost 10  million of the 15 million acres of land that they owned after the American Civil War. more info
 The Southern Workman, Vol 39, No. 12. The Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute.Hampton, VA.3988
The Southern Workman, Vol 39, No. 12. The Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute.Hampton, VA.3988
Price: $125.00

Some of the articles within this volume are "African Agriculture by Monroe N. Work, The Indian of To-day by Henry Roe Cloud, and The American Rural School by William A. Aery. Additionally there are ten images from photographs found within the three articles entitled Progress in Porto Rico, Restoration of Roman' Marriage Place, and the Awakening of Asia. 60 pgs. (pages are numbered 644-704). Tan printed wrappers. Measures 10" x 6 1/2" . The Southern Workman is a journal founded by Civil War General and Educator Samuel Chapman Armstrong, and is a magazine "devoted to the interest of the undeveloped races." Armstrong was the first Principal of Hampton Agricultural Normal  and Agricultural Institute (later known as Hampton College, now known as Hampton University), which was founded after the Civil War to help provided education to freedmen. The school also focused on educating other minorities, such as Native Americans. more info
Promotional Booklet Hope Farm for Children
Promotional Booklet Hope Farm for Children
Price: $125.00

more info
Patrick Joseph Carmody Fruit Growing in Victoria . Advertising and Intelligence Bureau, Lands Department .Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.1909
Patrick Joseph Carmody Fruit Growing in Victoria . Advertising and Intelligence Bureau, Lands Department .Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.1909
Price: $150.00

An advertising booklet meant to attract farmers into establishing fruit farms in the Victoria, Australia. The main portion of the booklet is written by Patrick Joseph Carmody who was the Chief Inspector of Orchards for the Department of Agriculture in Melbourne. He asserts that "Victoria, compared with all other countries stands unrivaled for the last few years in the expansion of the industry of fruit production." The rest of the booklet discusses the suitability of Victoria for fruit growing, how to dispose of the produce, state assistance offered to growers, the approximate cost to set up, the variety of fruit one can plant (Jonathan Apple, Cleopatra apple, Winter Nelis pear, etc.), pruning, and future development in the industry. Additionally, there is a smaller section dedicated to the 'Lands Administration in Victoria', where it provides information and advise on how to get land by various means, such as auriferous (rental) lands, lands by auction, and swamp/reclaimed lands, as well as the different types of land sites (business, garden, or residential). It also provides information on the various licenses one might need, such as grazing and bee farm licenses. Lastly there is a small section on the agricultural laborer's allotments as well as their home allotments. Approximately fifteen (15) printed black and white photographs. Advertisements on the inside covers. 16 pg. Pictorial wrappers. Staple Binding. Measures 8 1/2" x 5 1/2". more info
 Soviet Union Agricultural Feeding Program Poster. State Publishing House.Petersburg, Russia.1920
Soviet Union Agricultural Feeding Program Poster. State Publishing House.Petersburg, Russia.1920
Price: $325.00

A Soviet Union propaganda poster printed by the State Publishing House the various types of feeds available for cows besides hay. The poster describes a 'feed unit', which refers to the nutritional strength of one pound of a force-feed fodder, which is normal a mixture of oatmeal, bran and corn, and is the supposed ideal feed for cows. The poster then details how various other vegetables, such as potatoes and turnips, compare to this ideal feed unit. Additionally the poster provides information how to calculate how much of these alternative feed sources would be needed to replicate the nutritional strength of one feed unit. This information is surrounded by a decorative border that at the top features an image of a cow's head surround by sun flowers and foliage. Mounted on linen. In Russian. Measures 39" x 23". more info
Dean Brothers Blank Book & Printing Co.  Fruit, Produce, Butter and Eggs Shipper Journals. .Chicago.1870s-1890s
Dean Brothers Blank Book & Printing Co. Fruit, Produce, Butter and Eggs Shipper Journals. .Chicago.1870s-1890s
Price: $500.00

A collection of five journals for Fruit, Vegetable, Butter and Egg Shipper Journals from the 1870s-1890s. The four larger format journals are most likely from Chicago detailing the various farms from which they received their product. Four of the journals list out each farm and their location and are believed to be from the 1870s-80s. They are accompanied by a letterhead for J. C. Wallace, Commission Merchant, Jobber and Shipper in Foreign and Domestic Fruits, Nuts, Produce, etc. Chicago 1875. The titles of these four journals are: "Early Fruit and Vegetable Shippers, No. 3 Bermuda Veg. Shippers", "Butter and Eggs", "Shippers of Early and Late Potatoes", and "Shippers of Blueberries, Blackberries, Raspberries, Huckleberries, Gooseberries, Whortleberries, Snowberries, Dewberries, Currants, Cherries and Winter Green Berries, and Elderberries".  Each of these journals is approximately 120 pages long with an alphabet index tab on the side. The shippers are organized alphabetically by last name, followed by their location. With the exception of the "Early Fruit and Vegetable" journal which also includes locations in Bermuda, all the farming locations are from various towns all over the United States. Often within each letter there are subcategories, mostly references to either 'early' or 'late' seasonal shipments. However the Berry Journal is also subdivided by individual berry type (all of which were listed in the title of the journal), and the Butter and Egg Journal which has the subcategories of Butter and Eggs, Creamery Butter, Roll Butter, and Pickled Eggs.   The locations are predominantly Midwest and southern states including Illinois, Michigan, Tennessee, Louisiana, Kentucky, Florida, Mississippi, Arkansas, etc. Butter and eggs journal also includes Missouri, Wisconsin and Iowa.  Black leather covers, measure 13" x 8".   The fifth fruit journal is a smaller ledger with a variety of information in it. It starts with a list, approximately 37 pages long, of shippers of fruits and vegetables. It is most likely from the Boston area from the late 1890s.  This journal was accompanied by envelopes from the New England Fruit & Produce Co. The is an average of 8 shippers listed on each page, which includes their names and locations as well as the exact items they are shipping. Such as peaches, asparagus, tomatoes, grapes, melons, onions, or pears. The next 24 pages of the ledger lists the sales from September 20, 1897 to October 9th, 1897. These daily sales lists are either detailed list of each product sold that day, or a more simple list which simply totals the amount of cash sales for that day.  Measures 11 3/4" x 5 1/4". . Extensive information on growers and producers and the networks required to feed America at the time. The assumption of Chicago for the first journals is based on the bookseller labels in the journals and the accompanying letterhead.   The Boston location was determined by reference to Boston based individuals in the journal and the address on the accompanying envelopes.   All of these materials were found in one location without further information. more info
Emily Hockaday Blair Henrotin et al A Collection of Correspondence of Four Generations of Women in the Hockaday, Price, Blair, and Henrotin Family, Approximately 550 Pieces. .Missouri, Illinois, & New York.185 9 - 1962
Emily Hockaday Blair Henrotin et al A Collection of Correspondence of Four Generations of Women in the Hockaday, Price, Blair, and Henrotin Family, Approximately 550 Pieces. .Missouri, Illinois, & New York.185 9 - 1962
Price: $1,750.00

A collection of correspondence from four different well-known and prominent families in the 19th and 20th centuries as they intermarried through four generations. The collection, in total, has approximately four hundred and forty (440) pieces, with the bulk of the material consisting of around three hundred and seventy-five (375) letters dating between 1870 - 1962. Over one third of the correspondence focuses on the relationships between the women in the families, often the mother-daughter, sister-sister, aunt-niece, cousin-cousin relationships. The four families are the Hockaday, Price, Blair, and Henrotin. The Hockaday family was a pioneering Missouri family, and was very prominent in Callaway County, where they were especially active in local politics. The Prices were also a pioneering Missouri family, who were often active in local politics. In particular Robert Beverly Price (1832-1924) who was a well-known banker and gentleman farmer, was greatly involved in the financial success of his alma mater, the University of Missouri. Several of the family members attended this University over the years. The Blairs were one of the most powerful political families of the 19th century advising several U.S. Presidents across the party lines including Andrew Jackson, Martin Van Buren and Abraham Lincoln. One member of the family even ran as the Vice Presidential candidate for Horatio Seymour's on the Democratic Party losing presidential ticket in 1868. The Henrotin was a prominent Chicago family, of which various family members were known for their active involvement in the suffragette movement, founding the Chicago Stock Exchange, and serving as Consuls to Belgium and Turkey. The letters deal the relationships between the women as they age they age from young children, to mothers, to widows. They discuss family news, their health, gossip, current events, their frequent trips to see other family members and month long trips to Europe. They often send each other parcels, full of gifts, such as dress, coats, gloves, (some made from seal skin), and preserved food, such as jam and pickles. In addition to the strong maternal relationships represented in the correspondence, there a strong bond between Elizabeth Hockaday and her niece, Emily Hockaday Blair Henrotin (1883-1965) as Emily would stay for long stretches of time with her Aunt when ever her parents would travel. It could be said based on the number and content of their letters that Emily felt a stronger maternal bond to her Aunt than her mother. Emily Hockaday Blair Henrotin appears to have been the family historian and the one collecting the family's letters. As such a large part of her personal correspondence with her husband, Edward "Ted" Henrotin, son, Preston Blair Henrotin, and her, mostly female, friends make up approximately one third of the correspondence in the collection. The majority of the letters from her husband take place during their courtship, while they were separated due having to take care of ailing parents in separate locations between 1906-1908. At times Edward "Ted" Henrotin would write daily to Emily. The remaining portion of the collection, approximately sixty-five (65) pieces mainly deal with the Edward and Emily's life at their house and farm called Road's End, located in Cherryplain, NY or are various pieces of ephemera relating to the greater family. There are genealogy records and family anecdotes, a printed map of Road's End, photographs, newspaper clippings, visiting cards, wedding invitations, legal documents relating to wills,  Preston Blair Henrotin's school and medical reports (including a course catalogue) and miscellaneous envelopes. The photographs, totally about twenty (20) are black and white photographs, the majority of which appear to be portraits and candid shots of the Henrotin's at Road's End. The collection itself has been organized into three categories: correspondence, photographs and ephemera (including materials relating to Road's End). Within the category of correspondence the letters have been organized into groups by who the letter is addressed to. Each of these sub set categories have been arranged chronologically with undated letters placed in back. The majority of the letters have corresponding envelopes, however there are several envelopes with no corresponding letter. These envelopes have been added to the total count in the ephemera section. Below are excerpts from the correspondence: "Mrs. Hockaday presented your case to me as best she could bit to obtain a definite account of your symptoms, I will be under the necessity of asking you some questions. Does the blood alluded to appear bright and fresh or dark? And do you discover it in large or small quantities - only a drop or two or several drops with each voidance? [sic]" - June 26, 1876, to Evaline "Eva" Hockaday Price from her nephew, Euken "Poor John, my heart reaches out to him with all a mothers love and anxiety, he looked very feeble when he left home. Dr. W & Kerr performed an operation on him for piles [hemorrhoids], he had been passing blood in considerable quantities and they took off a tumor [hemorrhoid] half finger in length which caused him to lay in bed several days, he got out of bed and started on his campaign.... I hope to live to hear that Barclay has had all the died cut off his detestable back. I firmly believe Cittendue [?] and his men are at the bottom of it all. John was awfully crushed under the malicious slander." - April 13, 1880 to Evaline Hockaday Price from her mother, Emily Mills Hockaday regarding Eva's brother John, who was Attorney General of Missouri, and campaigning for reelection when D. Robert Barclay started making accusations in the press. "I received the birthday presents together with your very kind letter on Saturday, my 78th birthday, your letter brought tears in large drops, so many kind wishes and expressions was all duly appreciated.... as we grow old we feel that a little attention and remembrance is very grateful, more so than in younger days where we had a strong arm to lean upon. Widow has always been a name of sorrow." July 9th, 1883, to Evaline "Eva" Hockaday Price from her mother, Emily Mills Hockaday "My darling little girl, your beautiful letter came a day or two ago and I think I never saw my name look so well as it did on the back of it, written by your dear little hand. You will soon write better than Aunt Liz does... I am most crazy to see you and hear you say your letters to spell, I guess you will be reading very soon, you must write to me very often, for I can read every word you write." - February 13, 1888, to Emily Hockaday Blair Henrotin from Aunt Elizabeth (sometimes referred Aunt L, Liz, Lizzie, or Lizbeth) "Your big doll sits quietly in the parlor and your Rosefelt doll is in the middle of the bed in your Mudgie's room. [Illegible name] Blair with one last night, I made one read to her, it reminds me of you just a little bit. She cannot fill your place.... I am very lonely without you. No one to sit around with me and talk to me." - May 29, 1893, to Emily Hockaday Blair Henrotin from Aunt Elizabeth "For it sounds as though you thought we had neglected you, which we are all far from feeling like doing, and I farther than anybody. I thought when you came here I would go at once to see you, but we kept hearing how weak and nervous you were, and the great necessity of keeping you quiet, and free from all excitement and the annoyance of company - and whilst I knew I would neither excite or annoy you, still knew that my being there would bring company to the house. The family would have come and of course would have to see you. To avoid all that thought I had better wait till you were well. I had felt so miserable over not going to you in the fall when you lay there a month with no one  to stay with you when I could so easily have gone had I known you were even in bed." - February 24, 1898, To Evaline "Eva" Hockaday Price from her sister, Elizabeth. "[It's] the most interesting and the hardest work imaginable. Last fall it was feeding the soldiers as they sailed, usually at four in the morning at Hoboken, NY! Which meant my getting up at two. Since November it has been meeting the steamers at seven or light. It takes one to two hours, half hour exercise, one hour to get breakfast and dress, half hour in subway, so a 7 o'clock call means up at five. We do this four days a week on a moving schedule. Lucy Taggert (from Indianapolis, lives with Florence) and I are together in this. There is no telling how long one is headed- sometimes home for lunch and back in the afternoon or no lunch and dismissed at four, or, as one day two weeks ago we were there at nine AM and worked till 11 PM. That was wonderful, it was part of the 27th. We gave them a full meal, fed 36 hundred men in 45 minutes. Such a sight to remember! We had four lines of food (about forty women), the boys marched off the ferry boat four abreast, band playing, cheering crowds outside the gates. This was at Weekhawkin, they had docked there during the day from the big boats and were then on their way to camps. We gave them coffee, a big canteen cup full, big cream buns with raising which they adore.... [letter continues on for several pages describing the meal and items given to the soldiers, and what the soldiers said to them]". - circa December 1919, to Emily Hockaday Blair Henrotin from Evalyn (friend) "I have been hoping for a letter from you telling me what you think of Blair? I do hope he is behaving well, and not tiring you out with his noise and disorder! Our house here seems so quiet with away, and stays so straight that I hardly recognize it... I am glad that he is having this first visit with you and Grandfather, that he will always remember. I have such happy recollections of the long visits I used to make you when I was a little girl, and how you used to read to me, etc. That I want want Blair to grow up with the same remembrances." - November 29, 1921 To Aunt "Lizabeth" from Emily Hockaday Blair Henrotin "E. H. B. - this is very confidential, but isn't it funny how some families are money makers and some just aren't - Now the Mulford and the Henrotin just are and I'm hoping you can manger to bring up Blair to be a Blair." April 1, 1922 to Emily Hockaday Blair Henrotin from Mrs. Frank Burroughs Mulford (friend) "The depression has hit me pretty hard, like it has everybody else, and my investments have suffered considerably. While the greater part of them is in frozen assets, which are frozen so stiff that you could not dislodge them with a pickax. My Cherryplain [New York] property ranks first amongst these frozen assets and I am very anxious to dispose of some at a almost any price as I really need the money." - March 2, 1932 to Edward "Ted" Henrotin and his wife, Emily, Hockaday Blair Henrotin from Uncle Maurice "I am working at the Embassy  in London on British matters. We are prepared for the invasion by the Nazis and I have been wondering if things get too terrific with bombs etc, whether you would be willing to have Sylvia, Robbie and I come see you at Cherryplain [New York] until the war is over." - July 2 1940, to Emily Hockaday Blair Henrotin from Jones Page Blair "You see I have the advantage on you as my so call 'dog' is part tiger, part jackal, and just a touch of Burma Rat. Not much dog to him and he's really rough. He can properly even beat you at climbing trees.... he just laughed, walked out the door and and came back dragging a baby elephant to show me how tough he really is.... news from the front has been good the last few days, We can only think of and thank the boys who have given their blood and their lives to make the news sound good and pray and hope that this mass slaughter will come to an end soon. With the fall of Rangoon, the battle for Burma is close to an end. Germany should be completely defeated by the time you receive this. The cost has been heavy." - May 4, 1945, To Auntie 'S' from Homer  who was serving in the Army Medical Corps in Burma. "Your box has arrived in perfect condition. I can't tell you how delighted I am with all the contents. You really are too generous and I do appreciate all the lovely things you have sent... the nylons are very nice. I don't get them here and have only got a pair Helen sent me from S. Africa... what a good cook you are, it is a delicious cake and the cans you have sent are all the things we like best and so is the soap. I think it is so clever of you to know what we need most. Rice is a treat after so many years without any.... we had [my husbands] brother over here for last week and he took us out on Sunday, a lovely fine day in our car for a a run. On our way home we were run into by another car. Fortunately only our car was damaged. The other car turned over and four people and two children crawled out without a scratch! There are some very bad drivers about. The shock was bad for George and he had to be revived on the roadside. However he seems none the worse now.... We heard from John who had been on leave up country visiting some army friends in Malay [Malaysia], he says the banditry is far worse than here. He had to be provided with an escort to get Kuala Lumpur and they say it may go on for another two years." -  February 25, 1949 to Emily Hockaday Blair Henrotin from Adile M. Gahain (friend) . Emily Mills was born on July 7, 1805 to John Mills (1780-1865) and Lucy Mills (1783-1867) in Kentucky, She married Judge Irvine Otey Hockaday (197-1864), on May 3, 1821. They had several children together: Lucy M Hockday VanMeter (1823-1849), Amelia Hockaday Stephens (1827-1904), Margaret Hockday McGirk (1829-1905), Elizabeth Hockday (1833-1907), and Evaline June Hockday (1833-1922). She died on May 12, 1890. Her daughter Evaline "Eva" married Robert Beverly Price (1832-1924) in 1860. She had one daughter, Florence Augustus Price (1861-1935), and several step children: Edwin Moss Price 1857-1920) and Emma Price Willis (1858-1942).  Eva died on June 22, 1922. Florence Price "Mudgie" married Francis "Farver" Preston Blair (1856-1914) in 1882, and had one child, a daughter, Emily Hockaday Blair (1883-1965). While Florence and Francis traveled, their daughter was cared for either by her grandmother, Eva, or her maternal great aunt, Elizabeth "Liz or Lizzy"  Hockaday. Emily often refers to her mother, Florence, as mudgie in her letters. Florence herself died in 1935. Emily would marry Edward "Ted" Clement Henrotin (1874-1945) in 1911 and have one child together Preston Blair Henrotin (1918-1976). Emily died in 1965. more info