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 Attlean Lake Camps Brochure. Holden Brothers.Jackman, ME.[1930]
A brochure for Attlean Lake Camps, a nature resort in Jackman, Maine, on the shores of Attlean Pond. It features twenty-two (22) guest log cabins, most with private baths, that can hold between 2 to 6 people each. The camp has a variety of activities available to their guests such as fishing, hiking, swimming, and canoeing. The camp also features a large dinning hall where a guest can enjoy their meals, or opt for 'to go' lunches. While billed as a family resort, it also calls itself a 'sportsman paradise' as they have stocked the 'lake' with trout and salmon. The camp itself was first founded in 1895, and in 1905 it was purchased by the Holden brothers, Henry Lincoln Holden (1873-1952) and Ruel Evinder Holden (1876-1944). The camp is still in existence today, under the name Attean Lake Lodge, and is run by descendants of Ruel Holden. There is a die cut window on the front cover of the brochure that reveals a black and white image of Attlean Pond. The wrappers themselves are a printed faux wood grain. 33 images from photographs, two of which are full page photo collages. The last page has list of 'General Information' on the camp, such as 'hay fever unknown', 'Reduced Rates for Children', 'Jackman contains two churches', and 'there is a flying field in Jackman confirming to government regulations.' 20 pages, printed wood grain wrappers, staple binding. Measures 9" x 6 1/2".
 Brochure for New England Music Camp. New England Music Camp.Oakland, ME.[1940]
A brochure for New England Music Camp located in Oakland, ME. Started in 1937 as a nonprofit by Dr. Paul E Wiggin and his wife Nina Wiggin, the camp's goal was to cultivate and refine the musical skills of the youth as well as help to support the physical, emotional, and social well-being of young musicians. The brochure starts with a brief summary of the camp and then continues in more detail regarding the exact nature of the musical education, both instrumental and vocal, provided by the camp. For example, each student a has weekly private lessons, and that they are to practice at least one hour a day in one of the camp's twenty-one practice cabins. There are also a variety of group projects provided by the camp, so that students learn to play as a unit. A 'fully balanced symphonic unit' practices for an hour and fifteen minutes each day as well. Additionally, every Sunday the camp's youth provide outdoor concerts for the locals, family members, and past alumni. Throughout the brochure are printed photographs of the facilities, students playing their instruments, as well as other more ubiquitous camp activities such as swimming, archery, dances, canoeing, and playing tennis. At the back of the brochure is a page of 'General Information', which includes such facts as the camp enrollment (120 campers between ages 12-20), the cost, medical services, and a list of items to bring to camp. Additionally there is a page featuring the camps song, 'By the Shores of Messalonskee', including its score, and a page showing an illustration of Maine and the different routes one can take to get to camp. The camp is still in operation today and is run by the original directors grandchildren. 28 pages. Printed photographic wrappers. Staple binding. Measures 12" x9"..
 Camp Red Wing for Girls, A Camp Yearbook. Camp Red Wing for Girls.Adirondacks on Schroon, NY.1943
This booklet acts as a yearbook for the 1943 summer session. As this took place during WWII the summer yearbook starts off with "for all those who have sat upon the big rock and watched the evening descent upon Schroon Lake... we have been very fortunate, we Red Wingites, for even in a world at war we have known true friendship and untroubled hours. Yet we have not forgotten ... A flag raising each morning, in plays we saw on Saturday nights, in the songs we sang in the in the dining hall -- in every small part of Red Wing life ---  we remember the ideals for which our nation now fights. Let there be no mistakes about his -- in Red Wing we do not forget the world. But rather, in living as we do, we known and hold the more intimate aspects of democratic living." It is fitting then that the rock mentioned in the beginning of the excerpt is the same rock that two years later in 1945, camp owner Gordon Mason would stand upon and announce V-J Day (Victory Over Japan Day) to the campers. After this forward, the yearbook continues on to document the summer, filled with all the various events and activities the girls participated in. For example, the daily raising bell, flag raising, clean up and assembly, to activities such as drama, swimming, boating, basketball, tennis, volleyball, baseball, archery, tennis, arts and crafts, chorus, dance, and horseback riding. Each activity generally has at least one, if not several, corresponding black and white printed photographs of the campers, as well as a short, mostly humorous, descriptions or anecdotes. For example under swimming, it has " 'Who didn't check in?' the age-old question... and don't think you'll get into that water before it's answered. The battle-cry of one Irma Davis ... Well, who didn't check in?" Sometimes written in the descriptions are mentions of a camp rivalry between the Winnies and the Tuskies, the two groups campers were separated into to engage in various friendly competitions throughout the summer. The yearbook also includes 'class portraits' of each age group of campers, a few staff portraits and a list of winners from the Red Wing Horse Show, various awards for each sport and activity, as well as general awards for each cabin and best Winnie or Tuskie. The last few pages feature advertisements, a few of which are for local hotels and restaurants for when the parents pick up/ drop off, but the majority appear to have been advertisements made for donations of businesses run by campers' parents in order to finance the printing of the summer yearbook. There are a little over fifty (50) black and white images from photographs of the camp grounds and campers themselves. The front cover of the yearbook is mostly a simple pattern that it reminiscent of wood grain, with the name of the camp, the year, and a small line drawing of a stereotypical Native American young woman in braids with a simple headdress of a single red feather. Comes with original mailing envelope, there is no address on the envelope though, so this might have been an extra summer yearbook that went unused.  40 pgs with illustrated covers. Staple binding. Measures 11" x 8 1/2".. Camp Red Wing was founded in 1918 by Sarah and Gordon Mason. It was an all girls camp, ages 6 to 17, located on the shores of Schroon Lake in the Adirondacks in New York. While girls of all religions came from all over the country to enjoy their summer at Camp Red Wing, the majority of the campers were mostly made up of Jewish girls from wealthy families living in New York City. Camp Red Wing was run by Sarah and Gordon from its founding in 1918 until the 1950s, when after their death it passed to the daughters Ruth Resiner and Doris Henig. In 1957 the camp was sold to Mel and Lois Silver, and in 1963 Adele and J.J. Janovsky came on as partners. By 1974 the camp was being run solely by the Janovskys until it closed its doors after one last summer in 1980. At that point the land was parceled up and sold as residential lots for summer homes. Most of the camp's buildings were either demolished or sold off (the sleeping cabins for example were often moved off the land to other locations), with the exception of the Red Wing Camp's social hall which the Janovskys renovated into their summer home. This camp should not be confused with the Boy Scout camp under the same name in Indiana.
 Camp Rockledge for Girls. National Council of Jewish Women, Boston Section.Glouscester, MA.1943
A single-fold promotional brochure for Camp Rockledge for Girls  located on the sea in Lanesville, a neighborhood of Glouscester, MA. The camp consisted of two bungalows, the larger of the two housing the dinning rooms, kitchens, a large living room, and a screened in porch where some of the girls would sleep. The second bungalow, called Overbrook Cottage provided further sleeping quarters. Due to the "modest fees" of the camp, it was run by a small staff and the girls were expected to help by cleaning their rooms, serving dinner, and taking turns dishwashing. The activities at the camp included swimming, fishing, tennis, lawn sports, picnics, beach suppers, hikes, field trips to nearby sites, and stunt nights. The brochure provided a list of items girls should bring, and information on the rates, directions to the camp, and information on where to direct their applications. The rates were by week, $14 per week with $5 extra on the holiday weekends of July 4th and Labor Day, with the board to be paid in advance. The brochure often describes the camp as a vacation camp, and this is reflected in the fact that only girls over the age of seventeen or older could go to the camp, and as such this camp appears to be more of a resort than the traditional summer camp for young children. The camp was run by the Boston section of the Nation Council of Jewish Women, however with the exception of the requirement that all campers must be Jewish, there appears to be little evidence that there was a strong emphasis on religion at the camp. The brochure is printed with blue text and contains two printed photographs, one of the main bungalow, and the other one of a group of girls on the beach. A the base of the last page of the brochure, in red text, it states "NOTICE: It is a Government requirement that all Campers must bring their Ration Books #1 and #2." These ration books were due to shortages at home due to WWII.  This camp should not be confused with a camp of the same name, which was located in Blue Ridge Summit, PA. Single fold brochure. Measures 8 3/4" x 5 3/4" (folded), 11 1/2" x 8 3/4" (unfolded).. The first sentence in the Application and Reservations section reads "Camp Rockledge is open to Jewish women and girls over seventeen years of age".
 Camp Spaulding Brochure. Young Men's Christian Association.Concord, NH.1923
A brochure for Camp Spaulding, a Christian summer camp for young boys and girls in Concord, New Hampshire. The camp focuses on offering "real opportunities to gain a greater appreciation of the wonders of Nature and a reverence and loving thought for the Great Spirit within and around us." Each year the camp hosts two sessions, one for girls in July and one for boys in August with each week of camp costing $9.00. The brochure features nine printed photographs of the facilities and past campers, and one black and white illustration of a camper's blanket which features a design representing the camp's fourfold law. This 'law' is more like a code of honor, and it was for the 'Stone Face Tribe', a social group within the camp for those who participate in woodcrafting. This code is meant to enforce the more desirable characteristics of fortitude, beauty, truth, and love. This design is also stamped the back cover of the brochure. Also within the brochure is a post card application to Camp Spaulding. At the end of the brochure is a list of 'What to Take' for both boys and girls, as well as information on the camp uniform. This list has been marked up by the previous owner. This camp is still in existence today, but is now operated by the YMCA. 12 pages. Black stamped wrappers. Staple binding. Measures 8" x 5 1/2".
 Camp Tonka'wa for Boys, Juniors and Seniors. .Chautauqua, NY.1934
Camp Tonka'wa, pronounced Ton-ka-wa, was an all boys camp in upstate New York. There the boys would spend their summer camping in tents on raised wooden platforms participating in a variety of activities, such as tennis, golf, swimming, boating and canoeing, aquaplaning (a form of water-skiing), nature study, drama, horseback riding, arts and crafts, and model airplane construction. The brochure has fifteen (15) printed photographs featuring the grounds and campers at play from earlier years. At the end of the brochure there is a rip out application to Camp Tonka'wa. The camp rates are listed on the back inside cover ($150 for the whole season, $80 for a half season) as well as the additional charges for horseback riding and laundry. The camp also provided tutoring services as needed, weekly reports, and a small camp store for campers to get a few treats from. 16 pages, including illustrated wrappers. Staple binding. Measures 9 3/4" x 7".
 Camp Woodland, The Green Mountain Camp for Girls. Camp Woodland.Londonderry, VT.1937
A promotional booklet for the fifth season at Camp Woodland, a camp for Christian girls aged six to nineteen - though girls older than nineteen were allowed to attended occasionally. The camp was located in southern Vermont, in a town called Londonderry, nestled in the Green Mountains and bordering an unnamed small lake. The booklet starts with a short poem written about Camp Woodland by a camper from an earlier season (see below for excerpt). It then continues on to describe the many activities the girls could engage in at camp, such as: track and field, swimming, archery, tennis, boating, hiking, horseback riding, orchestra, glee club, drama, and dancing. At then end of the summer the camp would host a closing banquet where awards would be given out, such as the Efficiency Trophy awarded to the Best All Around Camper and the Enrollment Trophy given to the camper who had successfully enrolled the largest number of her friends for camp. Included in the booklet is a list and short biography of current camp head staff, a daily schedule, information on the camp admission process, cost, travel arrangements, camps regulations, required medical examine, list of require articles of clothing, laundry, camp newspaper, visitor policies, and camp store. Additionally, there is a small section dedicated to Kamp Kaaterskill, an affiliated camp for boys located in Pownal, VT. Lastly there is a direct "Word to Girls" which features excerpts from testimonials from both previous campers and their parents extolling on the virtues of Camp Woodland. The booklet ends with quotes and excerpts from poems from famous individuals, such as Calvin Coolidge, John Holmes and Kipling discussing the wonders of summer camps, and outdoor activities. The booklet has twenty-eight (28) black and white printed photographs throughout of the camp grounds and its campers participating in the camp's activities such as swimming and horseback riding. A few of the pictures are head shots of the camp's staff. Camp Woodland itself was established in 1932 and ran until 1949 when it was sold to Abraham Hertzen who reopened the camp under the name of Camp Derry, and ironically appears to have been a camp for Jewish children at that point. The camp remained in the Hertzen family, operating for over fifty years until it was sold in 2004. It is unclear what happened to the property after that. 21 pages. Illustrated wrappers. Staple binding. Measures 10 3/4" x 8 1/4". Below is an excerpt from the poem written by a camper: "God of the open air, Thou who hast made Thy dwelling fair, With flowers beneath, above with starry lights, And set Thine everywhere - On mountain heights, On Woodland dim with many a dream...".
 Invitation - Luther Hill Camp No.64.  Sons of Veterans, USA in Camp at Luther Hill 1894. ..
A center opening vertical card printed as a ribbon on a package on the covers.   When opened it depicts an image from a photograph  (perhaps Major D.W. Whittle) .  Includes pertinent event information and two day program.   Also includes a paper tepee that opens, however nothing was found inside the tepee.  Measures 14" x 4" when opened flat..
 Promotional Card for Dr. Gluck's Water & Physical Culture Institute and Gymnasium. Dr. Gluck's Water & Physical Culture Institute and Gymnasium.Chicago, IL.[1920s]
A promotional card for Dr. Gluck's Water & Physical Culture Institute and Gymnasium which provided medicated and plain baths to its patrons. Located in Chicago, the institute promoted itself as place that helps "the weak to grow in strength; the sick to throw off disease. We prevent sickness by giving the body strength." It provided a variety of treatments such as Turkish and Russian baths, general gymnastics, Swedish movements, vibration, massage, electricity, breathing exercises, needle baths and shower baths. These treatments supposedly would help to treat: constipation, obesity, rheumatism, neuralgia, sprains, paralysis, adhesions, cramps, nervous troubles, scars, lumbago, dyspepsia, sciatica, debility, sleeplessness, spinal deformities, and special writing cramps. The card also states that the institute is for "persons who work in a sitting position, young people who lack muscular development, children who require special exercise, those who are recovering from a long sick spell and are in need of careful exercise to gain strength." The institute was open all night and even had a barber shop. Double sided card. Measures 4 1/2" x 2 1/2"..
 The Famous Original Black Water Baths. The Famous Original Black Water Baths.Alden, NY.1915
The town of Alden in New York became famous in 1891 due to the discovery of black mineral water, more often referred to as black water, a thick, rotten egg smelling water with supposed healing properties. This booklet is advertising for the "Famous Original Black Water Baths" and its opening of our their new modern bath house. This new bath house was "thoroughly equipped with every convenience for the treatment and comfort of our patients." In addition to the baths themselves it had: sun parlors, sanitary drinking foundations, heated swimming pool, billiard room, tennis courts, steam and electricity. The booklet describes the town of Alden, Old Faithful (the original well used to drill for the black water), a description of the facilities, a scientific analysis of the black water (which was mostly chlorine, bromide and sulfuric acid), description of the care and food received there, expenses (both of your stay and price of bottle black water for at home use), and their hours of operation. They claimed that the black water helped mostly with rheumatic cases, and was "good for the stomach", liver and kidney issues, (unnamed) skin diseases, and nervousness. Apparently it was a "common occurrence to see people arrive in Alden on crutches, in wheel chairs, and on cots, and within a few days walk from the bath house to their boarding houses." The water itself was so heavy that one would "float like a cork" while taking a bath in it and the water left the "pores of the skin filled with pure salt". Interesting, unlike other bathhouses of the era that used a more traditional mineral water, patients here were required to bring their own sheets and towels. The booklet includes twenty-two (22) black and white printed photographs of the bath house, its grounds and the town of Alden. Additionally there are two printed maps, one a map of Buffalo, Alden and surrounding towns, and the second, is a larger map of western New York detailing its paved highways. The front cover has a colorized photograph ?? of the bath house itself. The resort had originally opened in a much smaller bath house in 1904. Operation continued in their new bathhouse until 1964 when it closed and the building itself was converted into a church. Printer: Ashby Printing Company. Staple binding. 20 pages.  Measures 8"x 4".
 The Masqua, Published by the Boys of Camp Belknap on Lake Winnipesaukee. Camp Belknap.Tuftonboro, NH.1936
Camp is an all boys summer resident camp found in 1903. Originally it was operated by the YMCA until 1996 when it switched to an independent non-profit. The boys ranged in age from 8 to 16 and could stay for one, two, four, six or eight weeks. Each year the camp puts out a Masqua, a compilation of the camp's weekly newsletters. Each week the newsletter would consist of short essays or stories written by one of the campers, copies of letters sent home, songs campers had made up, information on the various clubs at camp (such as the photography or nature club) or information on upcoming events like field trips, the 4th of July, or who won the camp tennis tournament. There is also one drawing that show a man saying "I'm wise, I'm voting for Campbell."  This folder consists of 107 typewritten pages. Below are a few excerpts: "Gee! Camp is a swell place, especially this camp. We got radios n' everything', 'cept out leader snores and I can't sleep nights, but it's all right 'cause my leader sleeps most of the afternoon anyway and he keeps the tent quiet so I get my rest in then..." - Letter home from Gilbert Stribridge.   "The season ends to our regret But we've made fiends we'll never forget; It's been grand to be here 'neath the pines And give our thanks to the Great Divine; We've helped ourselves, and others as well, How much is something we cannot tell. So, as we depart on our various ways So long, friends, and -- Happy Days." - Written by the Editor, Donald W. MacIssac as a goodbye at the end. At the end of the Masqua there is a list of all the staff members, counselors (or Leaders as they are called), and campers for the Summer of 1936, along with their addresses. Also included is the letter that was sent to each camper with the Masque from "Pa", the camp director, Ernest P. Colon, and a list of all the boys with October and November birthdays.  Wraps with 3-hole brad binding. Green covers. Brad binding. 114 pages (107 numbered, index and title page not). Measures 11 1/2" x 8 1/2" .
Camp Carolina  Camp Carolina For Boys Brochure and Envelope . Queen City PTG. Co..Brevard, N.C..1935
40pp.  Embossed cover illustration of boy golfer. Includes original mailing envelope with image of stereotypical Native American. The Camp Carolina brochure provides details about the general life and activities that can be expected for boys to experience. There is a description of the grounds, the surrounding scenery, and the general organizational structure of the camp's groups. The campers are divided into four groups by age range, and are able to participate in a multitude of activities, from horseback to riflery, golf, swimming and many more to engage the interest of the boys. All aspects of camping life are discussed including Sunday and Religious Services with a note indicating Catholic boys may attend mass in a nearby town if their parents desire, as only Sunday School and dusk vesper services were available at the camp. There are images from photographs showing views of the camps, as well as the boys going about the camp. Most of the pages also have a illustration of a Native American doing various activities.  Measures 12 1/4" x 9".      .
Evelina Reaveley The Tall Pines, A Summer Camp for Girls. Tall Pines Camp.Bennington, NH.[1924]
The majority of the booklet is comprised of approximately forty (40) printed black and white images from photographs of young girls of varying ages engaged in a variety of activities all over the camp's grounds. Nearly every photograph comes with a caption, sometimes a brief few words, and other times several sentences describing the corresponding picture. At the center of the booklet is a large fold out page full of photographs of the campers. The camp itself was located next to Lake George and comprised of a junior play house, recreation house, wooden bungalows for sleeping, dinning room, and kitchen. There were a large variety of activities for the girls to do, such as: arts and crafts, folk dancing and pageantry, boating and canoeing, gardening, nature study, community work, hikes and climbs, horseback riding, camp cooking, canning and 'roughing it', which was when the girls would go camping with no tent (unless there was rain) and sleep under the stars. There was also a variety of sports available to partake in such as: tennis, volley ball, basket ball, baseball, swimming and diving. Campers were required to wear a uniform, "Dark blue bloomers (plaited very full). Middy, white or unbleached. White hat. Red tie. Tan or black shoes and stockings. Sweater, red, blue or white preferred." The camp stressed a well balanced diet, and had dietitians who lived at the camp who were in charge of all meals. Cakes and sweets were not allowed to be sent to campers by their parents. The cost of the camp for the summer was $300 with horseback riding, or $275 without, with some extra charges for special day trips or arts & crafts. A small section in the brochure is dedicated to the Tall Pines Club, a separate camp located nearby for girls over 18 years of age, and there are instructions on how to send away for more information on this club. Also included is a list of current head counselors and staff, several pages of references, with addresses, of families who had sent their daughters to the camp in years prior, and a page of excerpts from parents' letters praising the camp. Lastly there is a tear away application for the camp at the end of the booklet. 45 pg. (including 2 fold out pages), with printed white wrappers. Staple binding. Printed by: F. S. & A. H. McKenzie. OCLC 2 (June 2020). Measures 8 1/4" x 6" (booklet), 32" x 5 3/4" (fold out page).. The Tall Pines Camp for girls was run by the siblings Evelina, John, and Catherine Reaveley, in Bennington, NH. Tall Pines Camp was for girls ages 7 to 18, with a Tall Pine Club for girls over 18, and campers were meant to stay the entire summer, from June 29th to August 31.
Florence Fleming Noyes 2 Circulars - The Noyes School of Rhythm for Children - Summer Camp. Cobalt, CT .1927
The first single-fold brochure has an image from a photograph of the gateway to the camp. In its fifteenth season.  It asks the these questions "Have you thought what kind of a summer you would like your children to have? Would it be something like this? That they be outdoors most of the day, in the meadow of an old Connecticut farm that slopes to a lake with wooded hills beyond? That they start the day with a Rhythm class in a big, open Barn overlooking the sparkling lake below? That they spend quiet, cool hours in an old shed, with clay, paint or dyes, which take on new meaning after Rhythm work? That they find evenings and rainy days perhaps the best of all, when they gather around big logs crackling and blazing in the fireplace in the Barn? And many more.  This is followed by comments from pleased parents at summers end., A second image of children in gossamer white gowns playing in a field. A pictorial map and basic info about the separate camps for Women and Girls and Men and Boys. The second is eight fold out pages with extensive information on the camp, testimonials, order of the day pricing, pictorial maps, peaceful images from photographs and gossamer gowned women "in a masque".  Pages are 8 1/2" x 5".. Created by Florence Fleming Noyes in the early 1900’s, Noyes Rhythm is a movement system that brings ease and strength to your body, while opening you up to great creativity in art and life. Many people, all ages, dancers and non-dancers, have come to Noyes Rhythm to relieve stiffness, tiredness, and loss of inspiration. The work combines a system of physical techniques and improvisatory explorations, encouraging subtle internal awareness, all supported by live music. The techniques build core strength, release unwanted tension, and encourage coordination, alignment and balance. Our movement always reflects the elements of nature. It is an organic approach that asks us to feel the breath of the forest, the ripples of the water, the rolling gait of the bear. We can get beyond our physical limitations and move together in universal rhythms. The Noyes system also affects our whole selves by inviting us ‘shed’ what we don’t need and find fresh resources for our spirit. Combining the grace and spontaneity of childhood with the clarity and discipline of maturity, Noyes Rhythm work connects us to the same strength that flows through all living things. A religious service mainly of song and often of a joyous informal nature.  The school is still in existence.
John W. Wanamaker Stock Share Certificate for the Bethany Building, A Fundraising Campaign to Enlarge the Bethany's Presbyterian Church. Bethany's Presbyterian Church.Philadelphia, PA.October 23, 1874
A stock share certificate for the fundraising campaign for the enlargement of "Bethany Building" where the Bethany School and church were located.  A part of this campaign was that with the payment of one dollar, an individual was given a share in the enlargement, as well as a certificate denoting that. The certificates were printed in red ink, with a simple double lined red border, and with spaces provided in the text to fill out the donor name, date, and certificate number. The certificates were also signed by the Treasurer, Sam M. Clement, countersigned by Mrs. W. J. Ferguson, and by Wanamaker himself as the Superintendent. The certificate also features a black and white engraving of the Bethany Building, though whether this is an artist's rendition of the what the expanded would look like, or the original building is unknown. This certificate was purchased by Sallie Maull. Bethany School School would grow to be the largest Sunday School in the nation, and the church associated with the school is still in existence today, and is known as the Bethany Church Evangelical Presbyterian and is now located in Haventown, PA. Single page, single sided. Measures 9" x 5 1/4".. The Bethany School was founded in 1859 and its mission was to educate the children of local area, who were mostly from poor families. The school was founded by E. H. Toland, a missionary from the American Sunday School Union and John Wanamaker (1838-1922) who was an American merchant. Wanamaker was also a religious, civic, and political figure, and was perhaps most well known for being a pioneer in marketing. Within two years of its founding, the school had grown to over 230 students with 17 teachers and went from a single rented room to its own building in the neighborhood. In 1865 the school had over 900 students and Wanamaker had decided to again move the school to a larger location and this time add a church. By 1874, the school and church were again too small to meet the community's needs, and a fundraising campaign to enlarge the "Bethany Building" began.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Halsey Gulick The Luther Gluck Camps - Guide, Yearbook, Cover letter - Girls Camps. Evans Printers.Concord NH.1952-53
A small format 20 pp brochure with illustrated wraps.  The three camps are located in Saco ME and include Sebago Wohelo: Girls 12 to 17 years, Little Wohelo: Girls 6 to 12 years and Timanous: Boys 6 to 14 years.  Descriptions of each camp including references to many of the Native American crafts and iconography of the Camp Fire Girls organization throughout.  An overview on the types of activities, accommodations etc. Measures 7 3/4" x 5 1/3".  The second is the "yearbook" for The Luther Gulick Camps - Summer of 1952". Suth Casco, ME. Consists of captioned images of photographs of the campers and their activities only. Measures 9 1/4" x 6 1/2".   The final piece in this lot is a cover letter to a potential campers mother.  Again, note the Campfire Girl iconography on the left margin. . The camp was founded in 1908 by Dr. and Mrs. Luther Halsey Gulick, the camps for the past 25 years have been under the direction of their son, J. Halsey Gulick and his wife, a former camper and counselor. Luther Gulick, who founded the Campfire Girls along with his wife Charlotte.
Mrs. G. W. Andrews Promotional Pamphlet - Wau-Kaun-Zee-Kah Camp, Merrimac, Wis. State Highways 81 abd 113 Lake Wisconsin. Baraboo, Wis...
A single-fold pamphlet with sepia toned images from photographs of the camp, points of interest and activities.  Named for the noted Winnebago Chieftain "Yellow Thunder".  Begins with a verse titled Wau-Kaun-Zee-Kah by Samuel A. Cooper.  A caption at the base  reads "Cottages and Garages for Rent" (Mrs. G. W. Andrews, Baraboo, Wis.)  This is followed by an over view of the camp with specific information on fishing and boating and bathing. Image of the "Owl's Head" on back cover.  Also includes an advertisement for The State Bank of Merrimac.  Measures 7 1/4" x 5"..
Promotional Brochure - The Bungalow Camp Life Club - Pine Woods & Ocean Air. ..c1915
A 14 pp booklet promoting the outdoor life in two locations - June 15-Sept 10th Eliot ME and Dec 1 - April 15 Green Acre SC. Images from photographs throughout.  The camp was open to any one who wished to live a simple and sane life out-of-doors, to study and practice those things which make for health and happiness.  Included family and boy's camps.  Rates for a family $15 per week.  Guests' Applications were not exclusive but congenial - suggested introduction from former guests or if inconvenient contact the camp directly.  Measures 8 1//4" x 6". .
Recreation Department Pictures of a White Mountain Camp, A Summer Resort Brochure. The Outlook Company.New York, NY.[1910]
Fryeburg-on-the-Saco was a summer resort open from July 1st to October 1st in Fryeburg, ME. While technically it was a summer resort, it was a particular resort that is hard to accurately define. This is something the place recognizes itself, and indeed starts of the brochure with: "A Camp? Perhaps that term describes it as well as any one term can. The fact is that its uniqueness prevents the accurate use of a name which could be applied elsewhere. An assembly, a settlement, a summer school, a family of families -each of these names and a dozen others succeeds in standing for only one side of the life which is pleasantly associated in the minds of many with the banks of the Saco and the shady trees of old Fryeburg." The camp was also home to several organizations such as the Fryeburg School of Method, the Fryeburg School of Theology and the Church, the Maine Chautauqua Union, and the Sunday School Institute and Bible School. The camp contain several buildings, Normal Hall for classes, Grove House for its offices, an auditorium where daily lectures or concerts were held, cottages for the guests, and a dining hall. The camp's drinking and bathing water all came from one well on the property that was fed by a mineral spring. Throughout the brochure are fifteen (15) printed photographs of the grounds, building, Saco River and White Mountains. 24 pgs. Green printed wrappers. Staple binding. Measures 7 1/2" x 6".