page contents

Join our mailing list!

You are here:Home > Science & Technology > Medicine
Choose a sub category:
Camps, Spas & Healing Waters
Sort By:
Page of 1
 1869 Valedictory Address of Toland Medical College,by L.C. Lane Professor of Anatomy. Published at the Request of the Class; Spears & Co. SanFrancisco. 1869. . ..  44th Annual Announcement and Catalogue of the Missouri Medical College - The Oldest College West of the Mississippi. Commercial Printing Co.St. Louis, MO.1884-85
An 18 pp pamphlet with paper wraps. An address to the Gentleman of the Graduating Class, November 4, 1869. In 1858 California surgeon Elias Samuel Cooper organized the Medical Department of the University of the Pacific with a board of trustees consisting of ten clergymen and three physicians. The first session opened in May 1859, with a class of ten attending lectures in materia medica, chemistry, physiology, anatomy and medical jurisprudence. Dr. Cooper's death in 1862 brought confusion to the new school, and in 1864 the Pacific Medical faculty "suspended" activities and joined Dr. Hugh Toland in his efforts to found a viable medical school in San Francisco. As San Francisco's population continued to grow, Hugh Toland's influence and wealth also increased, earning an estimated $40,000 per year. In 1864, he decided to establish a medical school in San Francisco and purchased land for that purpose in North Beach, at Stockton and Francisco, opposite the San Francisco City and County Hospital. A handsome building was soon completed, and Toland Medical College was open for enrolment. Clinical instruction and dissecting experience were the centerpieces of Toland's educational program, reflecting his training and experience in Parisian hospitals where clinical findings were carefully correlated with autopsy results." http://history.library.ucsf.edu/1868_hospitals.html 5 ¾” x 8 ¼” . 20 pp. Illustrated wraps.  Image of exterior of St. John's Hospital,  Clinical Amphitheater and Main College Building.  It begins with Announcements including Hospitals connected with the Missouri Medical College, Hospital Appointments, Clinics and summaries of each of the hospital specialties.  Also includes information on Chemical Laboratories, Spring Course and the locations of the College and St. John's Hospital.  It concludes with Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine, List of Text-Books, and Fees.  Finally,  it includes a list of Alumni of the Missouri Medical College from 1841-1884. Two full page illustrations of a clinical amphitheater and the practical chemical laboratory.   Measures 10 1/2" x 8"..
 Attlean Lake Camps Brochure. Holden Brothers.Jackman, ME.[1930]  Brochure for New England Music Camp. New England Music Camp.Oakland, ME.[1940]
A brochure for Attlean Lake Camps, a nature resort in Jackman, Maine, on the shores of Attlean Pond. It features twenty-two (22) guest log cabins, most with private baths, that can hold between 2 to 6 people each. The camp has a variety of activities available to their guests such as fishing, hiking, swimming, and canoeing. The camp also features a large dinning hall where a guest can enjoy their meals, or opt for 'to go' lunches. While billed as a family resort, it also calls itself a 'sportsman paradise' as they have stocked the 'lake' with trout and salmon. The camp itself was first founded in 1895, and in 1905 it was purchased by the Holden brothers, Henry Lincoln Holden (1873-1952) and Ruel Evinder Holden (1876-1944). The camp is still in existence today, under the name Attean Lake Lodge, and is run by descendants of Ruel Holden. There is a die cut window on the front cover of the brochure that reveals a black and white image of Attlean Pond. The wrappers themselves are a printed faux wood grain. 33 images from photographs, two of which are full page photo collages. The last page has list of 'General Information' on the camp, such as 'hay fever unknown', 'Reduced Rates for Children', 'Jackman contains two churches', and 'there is a flying field in Jackman confirming to government regulations.' 20 pages, printed wood grain wrappers, staple binding. Measures 9" x 6 1/2". A brochure for New England Music Camp located in Oakland, ME. Started in 1937 as a nonprofit by Dr. Paul E Wiggin and his wife Nina Wiggin, the camp's goal was to cultivate and refine the musical skills of the youth as well as help to support the physical, emotional, and social well-being of young musicians. The brochure starts with a brief summary of the camp and then continues in more detail regarding the exact nature of the musical education, both instrumental and vocal, provided by the camp. For example, each student a has weekly private lessons, and that they are to practice at least one hour a day in one of the camp's twenty-one practice cabins. There are also a variety of group projects provided by the camp, so that students learn to play as a unit. A 'fully balanced symphonic unit' practices for an hour and fifteen minutes each day as well. Additionally, every Sunday the camp's youth provide outdoor concerts for the locals, family members, and past alumni. Throughout the brochure are printed photographs of the facilities, students playing their instruments, as well as other more ubiquitous camp activities such as swimming, archery, dances, canoeing, and playing tennis. At the back of the brochure is a page of 'General Information', which includes such facts as the camp enrollment (120 campers between ages 12-20), the cost, medical services, and a list of items to bring to camp. Additionally there is a page featuring the camps song, 'By the Shores of Messalonskee', including its score, and a page showing an illustration of Maine and the different routes one can take to get to camp. The camp is still in operation today and is run by the original directors grandchildren. 28 pages. Printed photographic wrappers. Staple binding. Measures 12" x9"..
 Business Cards - Cancer Specialists - Cured without Knives. .Mound Valley, KS and Allentown, PA.c1900  Business Cards - Dentistry - Surgeon and Mechanical, Veterinary. .New York.c1900
Two (2) different business cards for cancer specialists, both claiming to cure cancer without the use of knives. Dr. Baynham also advises he also does not use caustic and plaster.  Reverse is blank. Larger card measures 2 1/2" x 4 1/2". . Two (2) different business cards for very different dentists in New York. One for a Veterinary Dentist operating on diseases of the teeth  for coughing, frothing at mouth, discharge at nose, hide bound, scouring, running at eyes, tossing head, driving on one line, cribbing, bolting, baulking, shying, etc. The second card  for R. Bogardus is for a surgeon and mechanical dentist in Brooklyn. Reverse is blank. Larger card measures 3" x 4 3/4". .
 Camp Red Wing for Girls, A Camp Yearbook. Camp Red Wing for Girls.Adirondacks on Schroon, NY.1943  Camp Rockledge for Girls. National Council of Jewish Women, Boston Section.Glouscester, MA.1943
This booklet acts as a yearbook for the 1943 summer session. As this took place during WWII the summer yearbook starts off with "for all those who have sat upon the big rock and watched the evening descent upon Schroon Lake... we have been very fortunate, we Red Wingites, for even in a world at war we have known true friendship and untroubled hours. Yet we have not forgotten ... A flag raising each morning, in plays we saw on Saturday nights, in the songs we sang in the in the dining hall -- in every small part of Red Wing life ---  we remember the ideals for which our nation now fights. Let there be no mistakes about his -- in Red Wing we do not forget the world. But rather, in living as we do, we known and hold the more intimate aspects of democratic living." It is fitting then that the rock mentioned in the beginning of the excerpt is the same rock that two years later in 1945, camp owner Gordon Mason would stand upon and announce V-J Day (Victory Over Japan Day) to the campers. After this forward, the yearbook continues on to document the summer, filled with all the various events and activities the girls participated in. For example, the daily raising bell, flag raising, clean up and assembly, to activities such as drama, swimming, boating, basketball, tennis, volleyball, baseball, archery, tennis, arts and crafts, chorus, dance, and horseback riding. Each activity generally has at least one, if not several, corresponding black and white printed photographs of the campers, as well as a short, mostly humorous, descriptions or anecdotes. For example under swimming, it has " 'Who didn't check in?' the age-old question... and don't think you'll get into that water before it's answered. The battle-cry of one Irma Davis ... Well, who didn't check in?" Sometimes written in the descriptions are mentions of a camp rivalry between the Winnies and the Tuskies, the two groups campers were separated into to engage in various friendly competitions throughout the summer. The yearbook also includes 'class portraits' of each age group of campers, a few staff portraits and a list of winners from the Red Wing Horse Show, various awards for each sport and activity, as well as general awards for each cabin and best Winnie or Tuskie. The last few pages feature advertisements, a few of which are for local hotels and restaurants for when the parents pick up/ drop off, but the majority appear to have been advertisements made for donations of businesses run by campers' parents in order to finance the printing of the summer yearbook. There are a little over fifty (50) black and white images from photographs of the camp grounds and campers themselves. The front cover of the yearbook is mostly a simple pattern that it reminiscent of wood grain, with the name of the camp, the year, and a small line drawing of a stereotypical Native American young woman in braids with a simple headdress of a single red feather. Comes with original mailing envelope, there is no address on the envelope though, so this might have been an extra summer yearbook that went unused.  40 pgs with illustrated covers. Staple binding. Measures 11" x 8 1/2".. Camp Red Wing was founded in 1918 by Sarah and Gordon Mason. It was an all girls camp, ages 6 to 17, located on the shores of Schroon Lake in the Adirondacks in New York. While girls of all religions came from all over the country to enjoy their summer at Camp Red Wing, the majority of the campers were mostly made up of Jewish girls from wealthy families living in New York City. Camp Red Wing was run by Sarah and Gordon from its founding in 1918 until the 1950s, when after their death it passed to the daughters Ruth Resiner and Doris Henig. In 1957 the camp was sold to Mel and Lois Silver, and in 1963 Adele and J.J. Janovsky came on as partners. By 1974 the camp was being run solely by the Janovskys until it closed its doors after one last summer in 1980. At that point the land was parceled up and sold as residential lots for summer homes. Most of the camp's buildings were either demolished or sold off (the sleeping cabins for example were often moved off the land to other locations), with the exception of the Red Wing Camp's social hall which the Janovskys renovated into their summer home. This camp should not be confused with the Boy Scout camp under the same name in Indiana. A single-fold promotional brochure for Camp Rockledge for Girls  located on the sea in Lanesville, a neighborhood of Glouscester, MA. The camp consisted of two bungalows, the larger of the two housing the dinning rooms, kitchens, a large living room, and a screened in porch where some of the girls would sleep. The second bungalow, called Overbrook Cottage provided further sleeping quarters. Due to the "modest fees" of the camp, it was run by a small staff and the girls were expected to help by cleaning their rooms, serving dinner, and taking turns dishwashing. The activities at the camp included swimming, fishing, tennis, lawn sports, picnics, beach suppers, hikes, field trips to nearby sites, and stunt nights. The brochure provided a list of items girls should bring, and information on the rates, directions to the camp, and information on where to direct their applications. The rates were by week, $14 per week with $5 extra on the holiday weekends of July 4th and Labor Day, with the board to be paid in advance. The brochure often describes the camp as a vacation camp, and this is reflected in the fact that only girls over the age of seventeen or older could go to the camp, and as such this camp appears to be more of a resort than the traditional summer camp for young children. The camp was run by the Boston section of the Nation Council of Jewish Women, however with the exception of the requirement that all campers must be Jewish, there appears to be little evidence that there was a strong emphasis on religion at the camp. The brochure is printed with blue text and contains two printed photographs, one of the main bungalow, and the other one of a group of girls on the beach. A the base of the last page of the brochure, in red text, it states "NOTICE: It is a Government requirement that all Campers must bring their Ration Books #1 and #2." These ration books were due to shortages at home due to WWII.  This camp should not be confused with a camp of the same name, which was located in Blue Ridge Summit, PA. Single fold brochure. Measures 8 3/4" x 5 3/4" (folded), 11 1/2" x 8 3/4" (unfolded).. The first sentence in the Application and Reservations section reads "Camp Rockledge is open to Jewish women and girls over seventeen years of age".
 Camp Spaulding Brochure. Young Men's Christian Association.Concord, NH.1923  Camp Tonka'wa for Boys, Juniors and Seniors. .Chautauqua, NY.1934
A brochure for Camp Spaulding, a Christian summer camp for young boys and girls in Concord, New Hampshire. The camp focuses on offering "real opportunities to gain a greater appreciation of the wonders of Nature and a reverence and loving thought for the Great Spirit within and around us." Each year the camp hosts two sessions, one for girls in July and one for boys in August with each week of camp costing $9.00. The brochure features nine printed photographs of the facilities and past campers, and one black and white illustration of a camper's blanket which features a design representing the camp's fourfold law. This 'law' is more like a code of honor, and it was for the 'Stone Face Tribe', a social group within the camp for those who participate in woodcrafting. This code is meant to enforce the more desirable characteristics of fortitude, beauty, truth, and love. This design is also stamped the back cover of the brochure. Also within the brochure is a post card application to Camp Spaulding. At the end of the brochure is a list of 'What to Take' for both boys and girls, as well as information on the camp uniform. This list has been marked up by the previous owner. This camp is still in existence today, but is now operated by the YMCA. 12 pages. Black stamped wrappers. Staple binding. Measures 8" x 5 1/2". Camp Tonka'wa, pronounced Ton-ka-wa, was an all boys camp in upstate New York. There the boys would spend their summer camping in tents on raised wooden platforms participating in a variety of activities, such as tennis, golf, swimming, boating and canoeing, aquaplaning (a form of water-skiing), nature study, drama, horseback riding, arts and crafts, and model airplane construction. The brochure has fifteen (15) printed photographs featuring the grounds and campers at play from earlier years. At the end of the brochure there is a rip out application to Camp Tonka'wa. The camp rates are listed on the back inside cover ($150 for the whole season, $80 for a half season) as well as the additional charges for horseback riding and laundry. The camp also provided tutoring services as needed, weekly reports, and a small camp store for campers to get a few treats from. 16 pages, including illustrated wrappers. Staple binding. Measures 9 3/4" x 7".
 Camp Woodland, The Green Mountain Camp for Girls. Camp Woodland.Londonderry, VT.1937  Clark's ABC Almanac or Anti-Bilious Compound. R.C & C. S. Clark, Operative Chemists..1877
A promotional booklet for the fifth season at Camp Woodland, a camp for Christian girls aged six to nineteen - though girls older than nineteen were allowed to attended occasionally. The camp was located in southern Vermont, in a town called Londonderry, nestled in the Green Mountains and bordering an unnamed small lake. The booklet starts with a short poem written about Camp Woodland by a camper from an earlier season (see below for excerpt). It then continues on to describe the many activities the girls could engage in at camp, such as: track and field, swimming, archery, tennis, boating, hiking, horseback riding, orchestra, glee club, drama, and dancing. At then end of the summer the camp would host a closing banquet where awards would be given out, such as the Efficiency Trophy awarded to the Best All Around Camper and the Enrollment Trophy given to the camper who had successfully enrolled the largest number of her friends for camp. Included in the booklet is a list and short biography of current camp head staff, a daily schedule, information on the camp admission process, cost, travel arrangements, camps regulations, required medical examine, list of require articles of clothing, laundry, camp newspaper, visitor policies, and camp store. Additionally, there is a small section dedicated to Kamp Kaaterskill, an affiliated camp for boys located in Pownal, VT. Lastly there is a direct "Word to Girls" which features excerpts from testimonials from both previous campers and their parents extolling on the virtues of Camp Woodland. The booklet ends with quotes and excerpts from poems from famous individuals, such as Calvin Coolidge, John Holmes and Kipling discussing the wonders of summer camps, and outdoor activities. The booklet has twenty-eight (28) black and white printed photographs throughout of the camp grounds and its campers participating in the camp's activities such as swimming and horseback riding. A few of the pictures are head shots of the camp's staff. Camp Woodland itself was established in 1932 and ran until 1949 when it was sold to Abraham Hertzen who reopened the camp under the name of Camp Derry, and ironically appears to have been a camp for Jewish children at that point. The camp remained in the Hertzen family, operating for over fifty years until it was sold in 2004. It is unclear what happened to the property after that. 21 pages. Illustrated wrappers. Staple binding. Measures 10 3/4" x 8 1/4". Below is an excerpt from the poem written by a camper: "God of the open air, Thou who hast made Thy dwelling fair, With flowers beneath, above with starry lights, And set Thine everywhere - On mountain heights, On Woodland dim with many a dream...". 32 (unnumbered) pp including standard almanac information  and information on numerous diseases and maladies with presumed cures by using the anit-bilious compound.  Some of the conditions addressed include Digestion, Dyspepsia, Loss of Appetite, Chronic Diarrhoea, The Liver, etc.  Additional testimonials on the back inside cover. Measures.
 Diabetes; When the human engine does not properly burn its fuel". Metropolitan Life..c1925  Information to the Public - Dr. R. C. Flowers Remedies  - Liver and Stomach Sanative, Lung Cordial, Catarrh Remedy,  Pain Destroying Elixir, etc.... ..1884
6 pp. Image of man fueling a furnace on front cover.   Discusses the fuel our bodies need, diabetes - its signs and causes, how insulin helps the diabetic and how to guard against diabetes.  One of the ways to guard against diabetes is "Infections of teeth, tonsils and other organs should be promptly treated and removed".   Hmmm..  Measures 7 3/4" x 5 3/8".. 24 pp. Illustrated wrap with image of R. C. Flower on the front cover and "Hygeia of the 19th Cent" on reverse.  A free to the public narrative introducing the company, the science in the preparation and skillful combinations.  This is followed by detailed information  on each of the companies numerous products with only the use of different type face for embellishment.  It concludes with Testimonials.  The inside back cover is a price list and includes Liver and Stomach Sanative, Lung Cordial, Catarrh Remedy, Blood Purifier, Pain Destroying Elixir, Nerve Pills and Magnetic Plasters.  Measures 8 3/4" x 5 3/4". .
 Invitation - Luther Hill Camp No.64.  Sons of Veterans, USA in Camp at Luther Hill 1894. ..  Miniature Die-cut Advertising Cars - Ayer's Patent Medicines. J. C Ayer & Co..Lowell, Mass.1880s
A center opening vertical card printed as a ribbon on a package on the covers.   When opened it depicts an image from a photograph  (perhaps Major D.W. Whittle) .  Includes pertinent event information and two day program.   Also includes a paper tepee that opens, however nothing was found inside the tepee.  Measures 14" x 4" when opened flat.. Four (4) different miniature stand-up die-cuts of various Ayre's products.  The image of the box on front and product advertising--essentially miniature trade cards that could have been displayed on a toy store or dollhouse shelf. Scarce items.  The largest is 2 1/2" the smallest is 1/2".  Scarce..
 Mother Gray's Sweet Powders for Children, Advertising Booklet and Paper Doll. J. B. Carroll Co .Chicago.c1900  Osteopathic Health: Good Health to All this Dear, Vol 53 No. 1,  What Osteopathy Does for Women, etc.. American Osteopathic Assn,.Chicago, IL.10228
Two pieces of advertising materials for Mother Gray's Sweet Powders for Children. The first item is a 16 pp (including covers) booklet advertising Mother Gray's Sweet Powders for Children, as well as other products sold by the manufacturer, including Mother Gray's Aromatic Leaf (a medicinal tea for digestive health) and Allen's Foot Ease (a powder to help with achy feet). The Sweet Powders was supposedly an all-natural remedy developed by a nurse, known as Mother Gray, who worked at the Children’s Home in New York City. While the powders were originally meant to treat pinworms, they were also soon used to treat a variety of other ailments, such as headaches, fever, and constipation. While it is unknown if there is any truth to who Mother Gray was, the product itself was distributed and marketed by Allen S. Olmstead who owned a proprietary medicine company. The powders weren’t exactly made from ‘all-natural’ ingredients, the main ingredient was actually calomel (mercurous chloride), which could be toxic if used regularly, causing mercury poisoning. Other ingredients were licorice, slippery elm, anise, sulfur, bicarbonate of soda, sugar (hence the word sweet in the name) and mandrake (also poisonous). The second item is a paper doll of Mother Gray, who supposedly was a nurse, specializing in children's health. The "walking" paper doll has feet on the bottom that rotate as you push it across a table. The pocket of the dress has an insert so that you can have something sticking out of the pocket. The back states that the doll was made by J. B. Carroll Co. Measures 5 3/4" x3" (booklet), 6" x 2 1/2" (paper doll) . Minor toning due to age. A volume of the journal of Osteopathic Health that focuses on women's health and how osteopathy can help. Osteopathy is a system of medical practice based on the theory that diseases are mostly due to loss of structural integrity of the body which can be restored by careful manipulation. There are six articles in this volume entitled: Dr. [Andrew] Still's Words of Hope, The Price of New Lives, Osteopathy and Obstetrics, Osteopathy in Diseases of Women, Mechanical Causes of Woman's Ills, and What Osteopathy Does for Women. The front cover depicts and image of a man and a woman walking up the front stoop of a building. 24pp (including covers). Staple binding. OCLC-1 (Mar 2019). Measures 7 1/2" x 4 1/2"..
 Penityrol Synergie Antibiotique, Patent Medicine Advertising Postcard. .Paris, France.19694  Promotional Card - The Eureka Nebulizer  - Special Treatment of the Ears, Nose, Throat and Lungs. O. Q. Holman.Le Grange, IL.c1900
An advertising postcard for a patent medicine called Penityrol.  It was a synthetic antibiotics created to help combat diseases that are transmitted through the air or to help minimize the possibility of an infection after a surgery. What makes this advertisement extremely charming are the anthropomorphic lab rats featured on the  front of the postcard. There are two rats just outside a doctor's office (the Doctor's name is Ratibus). The first rat is standing on his hind legs and is holding a checkered handkerchief, either blowing his nose or holding in a sneeze. The second rat is again standing on his hind legs, but hunched over in pain. He has a red handkerchief tied around his head, and his hand is clenching his jaw on one side. Presumably this rat is suffering from a tooth ache. The back of the postcard has information about the product in French. There is also an address for a Dr. Kohn, whose office is located in Paris. The postage stamp provides the date, December 26, 1953.  Measures 6" x 4 1/2".. A 5 1/4" x 3' heavy stock card depicting a five chamber device on the front and boasting "Far better than the Pulitzer Air Bag and Catheter in the Treatment of the Ear"... The narrative on revere advises it is for the treatment of Chronic Bonchitis (sic) incipient Consumption and all Catarrhal Affectations of the Head Throat, Lungs and Deafness.  It claims forced inhalations arrest an array of respiratory conditions, healing of ulcerations, restoration of the physiological functions of Osmose and more. .
 Promotional Card for Dr. Gluck's Water & Physical Culture Institute and Gymnasium. Dr. Gluck's Water & Physical Culture Institute and Gymnasium.Chicago, IL.[1920s]  Songs, Jokes, Definitons of Dreams, Language of Flowers, Etc. Etc,. Grafton Medicine Co..St. Louis Mo..
A promotional card for Dr. Gluck's Water & Physical Culture Institute and Gymnasium which provided medicated and plain baths to its patrons. Located in Chicago, the institute promoted itself as place that helps "the weak to grow in strength; the sick to throw off disease. We prevent sickness by giving the body strength." It provided a variety of treatments such as Turkish and Russian baths, general gymnastics, Swedish movements, vibration, massage, electricity, breathing exercises, needle baths and shower baths. These treatments supposedly would help to treat: constipation, obesity, rheumatism, neuralgia, sprains, paralysis, adhesions, cramps, nervous troubles, scars, lumbago, dyspepsia, sciatica, debility, sleeplessness, spinal deformities, and special writing cramps. The card also states that the institute is for "persons who work in a sitting position, young people who lack muscular development, children who require special exercise, those who are recovering from a long sick spell and are in need of careful exercise to gain strength." The institute was open all night and even had a barber shop. Double sided card. Measures 4 1/2" x 2 1/2".. A 32 pp booklet printed by the maker of Dr. Henry's World's Tonic and Blood Purifer and Dr Henry's Root and Plant Pills. Available for two three-cent postage stamps. An array of popular interests of the day including wood-cut engravings with children's verses, songs with music and verse, Language of Flowers, Marriage Guidance, Facts about the Bible, Language of the Handkerchief, Definition of Dreams and of course many testimonials for the products.  Back cover is a wood cut of a stylized bird with a talk bubble that reads "Quack"  creating a potent while chanting a verse about quackery and why you should use Dr. Henry's instead. Measures 4 3/4" x 3 1/4"..
 Tennessee Journal of Medical and Surgical Diseases of Women and Children and Abstracts of Medical Sciences.  Volume I No. 1. H. J. Wells, MD.Nashville, TN.April, 1884  The Famous Original Black Water Baths. The Famous Original Black Water Baths.Alden, NY.1915
14pp.  Sent as a sample copy. Begins with an editorial on the intent of the publication and tidbits on colleagues, insurance, improving the publication, etc. This is followed by excerpts from "Selected Articles"  including An Undescribed Disease of the Fallopian Tubes, Offensive Catamenial Discharges, Effects of Lime-Juice on the Menses, Water for Infants, Diarrhea - Caster Oil, Removal of Wens without the Knife and many more. Most are one to for paragraphs in length. This is followed by acknowledgments of Medical Professionals and friends.  Finally, it concludes with an 8 pp article by the publisher defending himself from an attempted professional and moral assassination by Prof. Deering J. Roberts, Editor of the Southern Practitioner.  Measures 8 3/4" x 5 3/4".. The 8 page rebuttal may have been the true intent of the publication.  This was the only issue published. The town of Alden in New York became famous in 1891 due to the discovery of black mineral water, more often referred to as black water, a thick, rotten egg smelling water with supposed healing properties. This booklet is advertising for the "Famous Original Black Water Baths" and its opening of our their new modern bath house. This new bath house was "thoroughly equipped with every convenience for the treatment and comfort of our patients." In addition to the baths themselves it had: sun parlors, sanitary drinking foundations, heated swimming pool, billiard room, tennis courts, steam and electricity. The booklet describes the town of Alden, Old Faithful (the original well used to drill for the black water), a description of the facilities, a scientific analysis of the black water (which was mostly chlorine, bromide and sulfuric acid), description of the care and food received there, expenses (both of your stay and price of bottle black water for at home use), and their hours of operation. They claimed that the black water helped mostly with rheumatic cases, and was "good for the stomach", liver and kidney issues, (unnamed) skin diseases, and nervousness. Apparently it was a "common occurrence to see people arrive in Alden on crutches, in wheel chairs, and on cots, and within a few days walk from the bath house to their boarding houses." The water itself was so heavy that one would "float like a cork" while taking a bath in it and the water left the "pores of the skin filled with pure salt". Interesting, unlike other bathhouses of the era that used a more traditional mineral water, patients here were required to bring their own sheets and towels. The booklet includes twenty-two (22) black and white printed photographs of the bath house, its grounds and the town of Alden. Additionally there are two printed maps, one a map of Buffalo, Alden and surrounding towns, and the second, is a larger map of western New York detailing its paved highways. The front cover has a colorized photograph ?? of the bath house itself. The resort had originally opened in a much smaller bath house in 1904. Operation continued in their new bathhouse until 1964 when it closed and the building itself was converted into a church. Printer: Ashby Printing Company. Staple binding. 20 pages.  Measures 8"x 4".
 The Masqua, Published by the Boys of Camp Belknap on Lake Winnipesaukee. Camp Belknap.Tuftonboro, NH.1936  The Tripod of Analeptic Therapy . Henry Pharmacal Co..Louisville, KY.[1905]
Camp is an all boys summer resident camp found in 1903. Originally it was operated by the YMCA until 1996 when it switched to an independent non-profit. The boys ranged in age from 8 to 16 and could stay for one, two, four, six or eight weeks. Each year the camp puts out a Masqua, a compilation of the camp's weekly newsletters. Each week the newsletter would consist of short essays or stories written by one of the campers, copies of letters sent home, songs campers had made up, information on the various clubs at camp (such as the photography or nature club) or information on upcoming events like field trips, the 4th of July, or who won the camp tennis tournament. There is also one drawing that show a man saying "I'm wise, I'm voting for Campbell."  This folder consists of 107 typewritten pages. Below are a few excerpts: "Gee! Camp is a swell place, especially this camp. We got radios n' everything', 'cept out leader snores and I can't sleep nights, but it's all right 'cause my leader sleeps most of the afternoon anyway and he keeps the tent quiet so I get my rest in then..." - Letter home from Gilbert Stribridge.   "The season ends to our regret But we've made fiends we'll never forget; It's been grand to be here 'neath the pines And give our thanks to the Great Divine; We've helped ourselves, and others as well, How much is something we cannot tell. So, as we depart on our various ways So long, friends, and -- Happy Days." - Written by the Editor, Donald W. MacIssac as a goodbye at the end. At the end of the Masqua there is a list of all the staff members, counselors (or Leaders as they are called), and campers for the Summer of 1936, along with their addresses. Also included is the letter that was sent to each camper with the Masque from "Pa", the camp director, Ernest P. Colon, and a list of all the boys with October and November birthdays.  Wraps with 3-hole brad binding. Green covers. Brad binding. 114 pages (107 numbered, index and title page not). Measures 11 1/2" x 8 1/2" . A booklet describing the benefits of Analeptic Therapy, and the specific drugs used in the process: Henry's Three Chlorides and Henry's Tri-Iodides. Henry's Three Chlorides was made from iron, mercury, and arsenic, and was supposed used to treat chorea, chlorosis or anemia. The three elements of the drug supposedly worked in conjunction with one another as, "it is a well-known fact that the simultaneous exhibition of small does of arsenic and bichloride of mercury, besides augmenting markedly the action of iron, prevent entirely the disturbances of digestion the constipation, headache and tendency to vascular congestion and hemorrhage which oftentimes follows the use of any iron preparation for a considerable length of time. The small dose of arsenic seems to diminish excessive sensibility of the stomach." The second drug, Henry's Tri-Iodides, was made from colchicine (anti-inflammatory), decandrin (plant), solanin (steroid glycoside, poisonous), sodium salicylate (sodium salt of salicylic acid), and iodic acid (iodine), and was supposed to treat gout, rheumatism, sciatica, neurasthenia, defective elimination and other diathetio diseases. The last page of the booklet is an add for Henry's Ichtyhol soap, a medical soap for skin issues.  20 pgs. (including printed wrappers) OCLC 0 (Jan 2019) Measures 7" x 5"..
 Vermont Sanatorium, Rules and Information For Patients. Vermont Sanatorium.Pittsford, VT.[1916]  Vin Mariani, Cocaine & Wine, Patent Medicine - A collection of 150 post cards "L'Album Mariani" designed by famous artists. ..1900-1910
A small booklet that describes the rules and other important information on the Vermont Sanatorium presumably given to the patients as they arrived. The sanatorium specialized in treating patients who had tuberculosis, or consumption as it is sometimes called. The booklet contains the guidelines for when a patients temperature taken, bed treatment, exercise, rest, daily schedule, meals, report days (days the patients go to the physician rather than the nurse monitoring them), hygienic instructions, expectoration, examinations, stimulants (no liquor), smoking policies, medicine, visiting hours, laundry services, duties of patients (including a small list of daily chores), business hours of the administrative office, and miscellaneous rules. The sanatorium was established in 1916, and deeded to the state in 1921. It closed in 1967, and its buildings were then used by the Vermont State Police. 17 numbered pages. Blue printed wrappers. Measures 5 3/4" x 3 1/2" . A collection of post cards introduced in five series of thirty created by renown artists of the day. Of the 150 cards this offering includes 119 original unused post cards and 31 photocopies  of the original cards (place holders).  The images were created by the artist, usually designed after one of their original works but making the Vin Mariani the featured element.  Many of the cards are captioned with reference to the product.  Other artists created completely new concepts to promote the tonic.   Each card measures 5 1/2" x 3 1/2". As an example, the artists in the first series Paul Avril,   F. Roybet,  Ch, Waltner,  Lévy-Dhurmer,  G, Meunier,  Paul Renouard,  H, Berteaux,  Muenier,  Mucha,  Hermann Paul,  Eug, Murer,  Lacault,  Ribéra,  K, Adler,  Léon Glaize,  Le Sidaner,  Paul-Albert Laurens,  Louis Noël,  Ferigoule,  A, Lalauze,  Hagborg,  Atalaya,  W, Bouguereau,  A, Maignan,  J, Cheret,  De Richemont,  Bigot,  Sem,  Léandre and  L, Vallet. .   At age 25, in 1863,  Angelo Mariani marketed a patent medicine called Vin Tonique Mariani a la Coca de Perou. Based on Bordeaux wind infused with three varietals of coca leaves in the bottle. It was immediately applauded as an ideal stomach stimulant, analgesic on the air passages and vocal chords, appetite suppressant, antidepressant and treatment against anemia.   Dosed as a small glass to be taken 3 times a day, 30 minutes before meals.  Each ounce contained 6 mg of cocaine.  Loved by kings and queens, popes and presidents, scientists and inventors, writers and dancers and more. Testimonials filled 15 leather -bound published volumes.
 Zylonite Spectacleware Catalogue. American Optical Company.Southbridge, MA.12997 3 Promotional Items Le Thermogene: Capsicum Cotton wadding to treat  ailments. Le Thermogene.Paris.c1900
A trade catalogue for American Optical (AO) which is one of the most renown makers of eye wear in the world. The catalogue starts off with a black and white illustration a birds eye view of their manufacturing campus in Southbridge, MA. Next is general information on the brand, how to place orders, and their quality guarantee. At the time AO had fourteen (14) glasses styles, with the booklet providing black and white illustrations of the glasses and a chart with prices depending on size and RX. Additionally, there are seventeen (17) different styles of the frame arms of glasses also pictured. Also included is information on four (4) different frame adjusting appliances, including illustrations, and a chart of size measurements.  16 pg. Printed wrappers with red borders. Staple binding. OCLC 0 (Aug. 2020). Measures 10 1/2" x 7 3/4". . American Optical was founded in 1833 by William Beecher, who began making spectacles after being apprenticed to a jeweler. In 1843 they made the first eye glass frames from steel and by 1872 had made several patented technological advancements which made eyeglasses affordable to the masses. The company proved to be an extremely successful venture and by 1892 had become the largest optical company in the world. Beyond commercial success the company started producing military eye wear, such as aviation goggles and sunglasses. The company can even claim to be the makers of the first sunglasses on the moon, as the Apollo 11 crew wore them on their moon mission. The company is still in business today, however their primary business is now sunglasses, and their manufacturing plant has moved from Southbridge, MA, to Chicago, IL. A collection of three items (in French) advertising 'Le Thermogene' a patent medicine product that was meant to help with a variety of ailments such as coughing, bronchitis, flue, sore throat, colds, joint pains, and rheumatism. The product was a heating pad that was composed of soft cotton wadding that had been treated with capsicum and could be placed on various parts of the body. The first item in the collection is flyer (measures 8 1/4" x 5 1/4") featuring a fire-eating circus performer in a green body suit holding the product (represented as large orange objects) and breathing out fire. This artwork was designed by Leonetto Cappiello (1875-1942) who was an Italian and French poster art designer who is nowadays often referred to as the "father or modern advertising." This was due to the fact that he was the first to use bold figures that popped out of their contrasting black background. The second item in this collection is a single-fold pamphlet (Measures: 6 1/4" x4 3/4" folded, 9 1/4" x 6 1/4" unfolded). This pamphlet provides simple, and to the point information about the product as well as depicting 6 illustrations of figures show how the product can be used on a variety of places on the body. On the front is the same circus figure by Cappiello found on the flyer, however this time the only color used is in the product the figure is holding, and the fire coming out of his mouth. The last item in the collection is a small 12 page staple booklet that is chalk full of more detailed information about the product. The back of the booklet actually has the image of the circus performer, while the front of the booklet has a roaring fire in a fire pit.  .
A Collection of Business Correspondence to Merchant James Beals. .Windsor, MA.1830-1838 A Treatise on Indigestion and its Consequences, called Nervous and Bilious Complaints; with Observations on the Organic Diseases, in which some they sometimes terminate.  A.P.W. Philip James Crissy Philadelphia 1824
A collection of thirteen (13) letters written to a merchant James Beals, alternatively spelled Bealls, located in Windsor, MA. The majority of the letters come from wholesale merchants in Massachusetts and New York. The collections contains bills sent to Beals, list of items purchased, information on shipments, and requests for payment. The items most often purchased by Beals are: gin, rum, brandy, tea, tobacco, raisins, cloves, and starch. Of note in the collection are two letters from wholesale merchants in New York, that in addition to their normal business correspondence with Beals, also remark on the cholera epidemic of 1832 and the number of cases around them. Includes one printed letter from a senior partner of the firm going out of business, Forbes & Freeman requesting all outstanding payments. Another is from a man who attended a recent railroad meeting, requesting that Beals furnish him with an accurate assessment of the amount of shipments from the town of Windsor on the railroads. All the letters in the collection are folded stampless post. On some of them "PAID" is stamped in red. Side note: One of the letters is misaddressed to Beals in Pittsfield, MA, a neighboring town of Windsor, MA. The letters have been organized chronologically. Below are some excerpts from the letters:

"Your order for the above dated 29th Apl, came to hand this morning & we ship the same day by Hudson Bargo No. 2 to leave this afternoon for Hudson. Teas of every description/ more especially Helkin/ have advanced very much in price & a quantity of equal with that sent you as billed above would readily command 60 @5 at wholesale." April 2, 1831, New York, NY.

"A committee was appointed yesterday at the railroad meeting at Lenox to ascertain the amount of tonnage from the several towns in this county - Can you furnish me with as accurate a statement as can be made the amount of tonnage from the town of Windsor, & the passengers to & from New York." - October, 18, 1831, Stockbridge, MA.

"The cholera seems to continue in this place much the same as it has done for several days here & there is about 20 to 25 cases a day and about 6 to 8 deaths, this numbers is not very alarming as yet. It being only about on half more deaths than our usual bills of mortality. We are in hopes that it will soon pass off as the cases are not to malignant but more mild." - July 17, 1832, Albany, NY.

"Sir, we have this day put on board the Oirecto [sp?] the above goods agreeable to your order of 30th and wish them safe & speedily to hand. The dreaded disease called the cholera still remains in our city, but appears on the decrease and we hope that it will soon leave us, for 3 or 4 days past the cases and deaths have not raised much." Aug. 4, 1832, New York, NY

"The necessity which I and my partners are under to make payments for our debts render it imperative upon us to call upon you for what you owe on the note in our hands. You must be sensible that we have already been disappointed several times when you promised that we should have the money. " - November 30, 1835, Greenfield, MA.
195 pp. Brown leather cover, no illustrations, Fourth Edition with some additional observations. A Treatise on Indigestion contains information and observations relating to the physical ailments. The chapters list the symptoms, causes, treatments of first, second, and third stages of indigestion. 8 3/4" x 5 1/2" wear on cover, foxing throughout, one page has torn edge but does not effect text, possible water damage on lower right side, inscribed
A. C. McCardell A Pair of Chromolithograph Advertisements for Soda Fountain "Health Promoter Syrup"  - Menu-style. Examiner.Frederick, MD.[1900] A.D. Haines Two (2) Leaflet Promotional Eye Charts Presented by Rochester NY Optician. .Rochester, NY.[1930]
Each advertisement printed on heavy card stock has a chromolithograph illustration on the front and the menu of syrup flavors on the reverse.  Both illustrate a woman wearing a Greek style dresses, and one is holding a branch of grapes while the other is holding flowers in one hand with a bunch of wheat and a scythe in the other. The advertisement on the back sides are the same for both- a list of the variety of health and soda drinks provided by A. C. McCardell. Some examples are: Pear Phosphates for impaired vitality, chocolate for nourishing and refreshment, Moxie for weakened energy, and Sarsaparilla for the blood. Also sold by A. C. McCardell were a whole line of Fruit Syrups and Ice Cream Soda, as well as Mineral Waters from Vichy (for Gentlemen), Deep Rock (for kidney trouble), and Bedford (for "sick headache"). Each item Measures 7" x 5".. A. C. McCardell was a whole sale confectionary company located in Frederick, MD owned by Adrian C. McCardell (1845-1932). He sold a variety of sugary products, though these two items focus on the items he sold that were for "health". Two (2) different 8 3/4" x 4 1/4" promotional flyers presented by Dr. A. D. Haines, Eye and Ear Specialist.  Each titled Test Your Eyes! with a different graphic at top to quickly determine the need to seek the care of an eye specialist. One also has a sentence of fine print to determine the need for reading glasses.   This is followed by different witty promotional verses encouraging individuals to have a  their eyes tested free by Dr. Haines. The reverse again with different messaging - one further describes his practice and assurances and the other discusses astigmatism..
A.M. Smith San Luis Hot Sulphur Springs. San Luis Hot Sulphur Springs.San Luis Obispo, CA.[1907] Advertising Leaflet
An promotional booklet for San Luis Hot Sulphur Springs which was operated by A. M. Smith. The booklet contains information about the resort and over twenty-five printed black and white photographs of the resort and surrounding area. The resort claimed that their water had healing properties. The water itself has a "volume of about 200,000 gallons every 24 hours and its temperature 110 degrees Fahrenheit", and that curative properties of the water has helped those who have "suffered for years... thousands, in fact, have been saved from lives of absolute torture, by bathing in and drinking of these wonderful waters." The spa was open year around and claimed that their "prices [were] not extortionate" as it is "a lot cheaper to spend a few weeks at San Luis Ho Sulphur Springs than to be sick half the year." The booklet provides information on the resort itself, the rates, surrounding country, directions on how to get there by train, climate, bath facilities, cuisine, activities provided (like sports) and testimonials of past guests. The first and last page have information on special rates, printed in red, along with an illustrated map of San Luis Obispo. The front cover has a lino cut, two tone print, in black and orange, of the California coast. Hot springs were found in San Luis Obispo in 1886 when prospectors were drilling for oil, but instead found mineral water. It appears as though some sort of resort has existed in the town since then. Currently a there is a resort called Sycamore Mineral Springs Resort & Spa, which on its website claims that a spa has existed on their property since mineral water was discovered in 1886. Whether the Sycamore Mineral Springs is located on the same spot as San Luis Hot Sulphur Springs is unknown. Newspaper advertisements show the San Luis Hot Sulphur Springs was in business from the late 1890s till the mid 1910s at least. 28 pgs. Illustrated maroon wrappers. Note: While the testimonials in the booklet date from 1903, the booklet states that the resort has been in operation for twenty years. As such, since the springs were discovered in 1886, the booklet dates to circa 1906-1907. Staple binding. OCLC 3 (August 2020). Measures 6 3/4" x 5". . A flyer for Glyco-Thymoline, an alkaline antiseptic for the efficient treatment of inflammatory conditions of mucous membrane in all parts of the body, by Kress & Wren Company.
Advertising Trade Card Arthur H. Chandler Requirements for Co-Operation Between Hospitals and Funeral Directors. ..[1926]
Adv trade card or business card for The Marks Adjustable Folding Chair Company Sole inventors, manufactures and proprietors of Surgical and Gynecological Chairs This booklet contains a speech that was first delivered by Arthur H. Chandler at the New England Hospital Association Conference in May 1925. This speech gave a fictional telling of the death of Mr. Bank's niece and the subsequent miscommunications between the hospital and funeral home in regards to the care of her body, and ultimate dissatisfaction due to this that Mr. Banks had in regards to the resulting look of his niece. This story was used as a means of exemplifying the issues funeral directors were having in preparing bodies for viewing after an autopsy had been performed. After his speech, is a recording of the discussion which followed by a panel of members of the association. After there is a report of the committee regarding the issue, possible solutions, as well as examples of possible autopsy consent forms and a proposal for a standardization of autopsy methods. In addition to the text there  is a simple illustration of the human body detailing the proposed incision locations. This speech, discussion and report was later published in the Boston Medical and Surgical Journal Vol. 194, No. 16, in April of 1926. This item is a reprinting of that article. There is no information regarding the publication date or time of this particular edition. 22 pps. Green wrappers. Staple binding. Measures 9" x 6".
B.F. McDonald Co. Double Sided Insta-Aid - First Aid at a Glance Volvelle or Wheel. Davis Emergency Equipment Co., Inc.Newark.1932 Bethesda Sanatorium Bethesda Sanatorium, an Advertising Folding Brochure. The Smith-Brooks Press.Denver, CO.1917
A 4" volvelle printed on both sides with assistance for twenty (20) emergency situations from  Asphyxiation and Alcohol Posiging to Arteries Bleeding, Fractures, Heat Exhaustion and Wounds. Each side include two die-cuts  one for the injury and the other for Symptoms and Treatment.  One side has an illustrations  depicting a skeleton with the vascular system, denoting Arteries and Points of Pressure for Controlling Hemorrhages.  This side also includes  basic eight (8) points of first aid for most vascular related first aid.  The reverse illustrates Artificial Respirations along with the information on the wheels. In original sleeve. . An eight page folded brochure for Bethesda Sanatorium, a Christian Institution specializing on the treatment of tuberculosis. Located in Denver, CO, overlooking the Rocky Mountains, the institution sits at about five thousand feet above sea level. This high altitude, that is 'light and dry' was supposedly "not so irritating to the respiratory tract, and [it] gives a better opportunity for healing of the diseased tissues." What is interesting about this sanatorium in particular is that it stresses that "the institution is not a hospital in any sense of the word. The Sanatorium is a Health University, where patients are taken and taught methods of living by which they are able to effect an arrest of the disease." Most of the sanatoriums around this time consistently made claims that they could 'cure' all types of diseases, including tuberculosis, rather than stressing teaching their patients how to manage and live with chronic diseases. The brochure also includes nine (9) printed photographs of the facility, grounds and staff. 8 folding pages. The institution is still open today, but is now known as the Bethesda Christian Counseling Midwest, Inc. Measures 9" x 4" (folded), 16" x 9" (unfolded).
Birmingham Musical Festival Committee Birmingham Musical Festival Broadside, A Charity Fundraiser. B. Hunt and Sons.Birmingham, England.September 1849 Camp Carolina  Camp Carolina For Boys Brochure and Envelope . Queen City PTG. Co..Brevard, N.C..1935
A broadside for the  Birmingham Musical Festival, more often called the Birmingham Triennial Music Festival, which was the longest-running classical music festival. It was founded in 1787, it is several day musical festival, that ran in September every three years. The money raised by the festival originally went towards the construction of a General Hospital and after its completion, towards it's upkeep. The festival last took place in 1912. This broadside advertises the dates of the 1849 festival, September 4-7, the ticket prices, opening of doors, general directions, dress ball information, entrances, and carriage information. J. F. Ledsam, chairman. Measures 14" x 9". 40pp.  Embossed cover illustration of boy golfer. Includes original mailing envelope with image of stereotypical Native American. The Camp Carolina brochure provides details about the general life and activities that can be expected for boys to experience. There is a description of the grounds, the surrounding scenery, and the general organizational structure of the camp's groups. The campers are divided into four groups by age range, and are able to participate in a multitude of activities, from horseback to riflery, golf, swimming and many more to engage the interest of the boys. All aspects of camping life are discussed including Sunday and Religious Services with a note indicating Catholic boys may attend mass in a nearby town if their parents desire, as only Sunday School and dusk vesper services were available at the camp. There are images from photographs showing views of the camps, as well as the boys going about the camp. Most of the pages also have a illustration of a Native American doing various activities.  Measures 12 1/4" x 9".      .
Charles B. Dickinson Business Card - Keep Smiling Card promotes Chiropractor. .Columbus Ohio.1916 Collection of 110 Get Well Greeting Cards- How we Encouraged those who Ailed 1920s-1950s
A 2 3/8" x 3 1/2" lightly coated business card  that reads "KEEP SMILING" in bold type face.  Surprisingly it is not for a dentist but a for a Doctor of Chiropractic  A chart on the reverse displays how subluxated spine effects each vertebra and the different organ or part of your body impacted. "Chiropractic Adjustments Will Remove the Cause of Disease". . A collection of 110 different get well cards, predominantly for children and dating from the 1930s to the 1950s with others 1910 to 2000. A majority of the cards in this collection are light-hearted in nature and intended to “cheer-up” the recipient.  Selected from a 30 plus year extensive collection of greeting cards, the get-well cards are among the most creative and entertaining.  Common threads are humor and depicting people or anthropomorphic animals being cheerful and experiencing improved wellness.  Condition is generally very good, many are signed.  Some with tape marks and light corner bends.  Overall, an interesting representation of socially acceptable means of dealing with illness at the time.  To view the details on the collection click HERE .
D. A. Cleaveland, M. D. Atlantic Side Sanitarium, 'Glencroe' West Tisbury, Martha's Vineyard, MA.[1900] Dr. Bulter Wilmarth  A Letter between Two Doctors about working together at a Sanitarium and the Use of Homeopathic Medicines. .Lowell, MA.September 26, 1849
Single fold pamphlet advertising a newly built sanitarium called Glencroe, in the small town of West Tisbury located on Martha's Vineyard in Massachusetts. The proprietor, Dr. D. A. Cleaveland, of the sanitarium starts by praising the weather, which apparently in winter is only "five degrees colder than Old Point Comfort, VA", and then continues on to state the numerous diseases which are not a problem for the islands residents. "Diphtheria is unknown in this part of the island. Malignant Scarlatina, typhoid fever, cholera infantum, or any inflammatory intestinal disease, together with phthisis, are rarely met with..." Cleaveland spends some time describing the "modern conveniences" of Glencroe, before addressing the types of patients he wishes to receive, "with the present accommodations he can only care for a certain class of cases, viz., some forms of neurasthenia, insomnia, diseases characterized by deficient nerve force, malaria, surgical convalescents, and those convalescing from acute non-contagious disease; but for the present he is unable to accommodate cases of insanity, epilepsy, or any other malady that would shock the sensibilities of the most delicate and refined invalid." Single fold. Measures 7" x 4 1/4" (folded), 8 1/2" x 7" (unfolded). . Stampless post. A letter between two doctors, Dr. Bulter Wilmarth and Dr. John Hero that discussing the various patients at a local sanitarium in Lowell, MA, that Wilmarth is treating. There is also some talk about the possibility of the pair working together, either at the current sanitarium or purchasing a sanitarium together elsewhere. This idea for the men to buy and run a sanitarium together does not appear to be a new one, but rather one that they have been kicking around for a while. Dr. Butler Wilmarth seems to be temporarily working at the sanitarium in Lowell, it is unclear if he was asked for fill in for a doctor there and heard about the possible sale of the sanitarium or if he is there as a potential buyer and decided to take on some work there to see if he like it. One thing is clear, that while it appears as though Dr. Wilmarth has respect for the "water cures", other homeopathic remedies are not to his liking, even as he does his best to learn about them and treat patients using them. The two doctors, Wilmarth and Hero, were friends that had first established their relationship as a mentor-student bond when Hero was studying medicine under Wilmarth. The two did not purchase the sanitarium discussed in the letter, but a few years later, in 1851, they would purchase one in Westboro, MA. Below are some quotes from the letter: "But I am in quite an interesting and instructive school myself and I wish you was here to share a part in the labor and responsibleness of the institution.  Here is considerable head-work to do, I assure you - I have about all sorts of diseases and dispositions to deal with and need much wisdom as well as some patience to get along with so many crooked patients, bathmen [sic], cooks, waiters, &c. I have been able to keep things pretty straight yet. We have 28 patients now. Some are doing well, some stationary some growing worse if any thing. It is no small task to answer all their questions, explain all their difficulties, and encourage them to hope and persevere. Some of the are quite homeopathic and want to be swallowing pellets and powders. Dr. Foster has lots of homeopathic medicine, so I give a little hurf [also known as cress or lepidium sativum], and coffea [coffea cruda] and bell [belladonna?] and hyos [hyoscyamus niger] and bryonia and mercurius. But for my life, I can't tell whether it does any good or not." "I hope to return in about 2 weeks, and that cant make a thousand dollars difference with the cold hearted owner. I think - if it does - let it go to the first bidder. There are more places in N.E. (New England) than Grapton or Worchester or even Milford.... It is some expected Dr. Tortes will leave here. I have been invited by the owner to hire, or buy, this their stand in such an event. Here everything is ready, furniture and all for operations. Never fear (if the Lord will) we will do something next season some where." . Dr. Butler Wilmarth was born on December 18, 1798 in Montague, MA to Peggy Coleman. He was an illegitimate child, and while his biological father was never named, Butler believed that he was a man of some note in town. In 1802 he was bound out to town selectman Amos Wilmarth of Rowe, who would eventually adopt him, and Butler would take his name. He began studying medicine at the age of 23 under the tutelage of Dr. William F. Selden. On March 1, 1831 he married Phila Osgood (1806-1859). Together they had two children: Jerome Terome Wilmarth (1831-?) and Phila Wilmarth Weston (1841-1903). In 1841 he would become a convert to hydropathic remedies, after he himself fell it and was cured by such treatments. He worked and established a variety of different bath houses in Massachusetts and New York before establishing one with a former student of his, J. H. Hero in Westboro, MA. In 1851 he was elected President of the Hydropathic Association of Physicians and Surgeons. On May 6, 1853, while returning from the association's annual meeting, the train he was on suffered a catastrophic collision at the Norwalk Bridge in CT. Wilmarth and over forty-five others would perish in the train accident, which is considered to be the first major US railroad disaster. . John Henry Hero  was born on December 30, 1820 to John Hero (1787-1861) and Polly Claffin (1791-1832) in Milford, MA. He had several siblings: Susannah H. Hero (1811-?),  Horace B. Hero (1812-?) Eliza H Hero (1814-1867), Hannah H Hero (1817-?), Izanna Chamberlain Hero (1823-1914), and Edwin H Hero (1831-?). He married Irene Morse Parkhurst (1822-1906) on September 22, 1850. They had three children: Butler Wilmarth Hero (1859 -1932) who was named after John's friend, mentor, and business partner, George Hoyt Hero (1861-1933), and John P. Hero (1863-1865). John studied medicine with Dr. Butler Wilmarth of Hopedale and graduated from Central Medical College in Syracuse, NY. Him and Wilmarth formed a strong mentorship bond that, in 1852, resulted in him and Wilmarth going into business with one another in Westboro by opening a bath house. In 1853, after Wilmarth's death, Hero would become the sole owner. On January 6, 1898 John would die of heart disease, which was a complication of his stomach cancer.
Dr. Howard G. Thornton A Letter from the Physician, Howard Thornton to his brother, regarding the uptake in his business and the high water levels of the Mississippi River. .Poplar, Mississippi.April 7, 1890 Dr. Miles Paper Doll - Katrina Knickerbocker - I talk for Dr. Miles' Heart Cure. Dr. Miles Medical Co. .Elkhart In..1902
A two page letter from Howard G. Thornton, a physician and surgeon located in Poplar, MS. He is writing his younger brother, Ed, who lives in Commerce, TX, with their parents. Thornton describes a busy winter in Mississippi, with lots of sickness, and a rainy spring, which as caused the Mississippi River to have rather high water levels. Thornton also spends a great deal of the letter encouraging his brother to study hard, in particular, to start studying medicine, and that he will do everything to help him. To that end, he has supplied his brother with a subscription to the journals, 'Home and Farm' and 'Colinder Journal'. Below are some excerpts from the letter. "I have been very busy with practice &c. We have had a great deal of sickness this winter. My practice is increasing so much I have had to buy another horse. I have physicians on all sides of me but I am getting my fair shair [sic] of practice." "I wish you would try and prepare yourself and read medicine. I will give you all the assistance I can if you will study your books at home and read good books and papers, do not let your mind run off on trashy books &c." "We have had so much rain in this country the people are very badly behind with crops. The Miss. River will soon be in about eight miles of me. I am about forty miles of the river. It is thought that tit will be the highest that has ever been. It is up to [sic] high, water marks on the Government gage now and the signal service reports another rise coming. The levies are already badly broken, and that will tear them all to pieces." The letter and corresponding envelope are written on Howard G. Thornton's business stationary. Measures 9 1/2" x 5 3/4" (letter), 6"x 3 1/2" (envelope). A 20 3/4" tall die-cut easel back paper doll depicting Katrina Knickerbocker holding a bottle of Dr. Miles New Heart Cure. The reverse introduces Katrina, a character in Rip Van Winkle and of course promoting the various Dr. Miles with brief narratives and a complete product listing including pricing.  Also includes three costumes and hats.   The costumes are identified e.g. for a stroll on the Bowling Green.  Each costume has product information on the reverse. The paper dolls were offered as premiums for a product label and five 2 cent stamps.  .
Dr. Miles Paper Doll -Dorothy (Dolly) Quincy - Holding a Bottle of Dr. Miles Restorative Nervine. Dr. Miles Medical Co. .Elkhart In..1902 Dr. S. H. Monell Announcement for The Coil and Static Club of the United States. .New York, NY.[1900]
A 20 3/4" tall die-cut easel back paper doll depicting Dorothy (Dolly) Quincy  holding a bottle of Dr. Miles Restorative Nervine. The reverse introduces Dolly, the future wife of John Hancock and of course promoting the various Dr. Miles with brief narratives and a complete product listing including pricing.  Also includes three costumes and hats.   The costumes are identified e.g. the gown she wore when first she met John Hancock.  Each costume has product information on the reverse.  Includes original mailer from Dr. Miles Medical Co. The paper dolls were offered as premiums for a product label and five 2 cent stamps.  . A single-fold brochure announcement of a medical society Monell was forming, called the Coil and Static Club, whose purpose was to "carry out a practical plan for keeping an up-to-date revision of clinical methods and new work constantly at the command of all physicians who use Therapeutic Apparatus." At the charge of a $1 initiation fee and annual dues of $5, the society would provide the members five benefits. First, a "year book", which was a bound copy of all relevant literature and articles published on electro-therapeutics that year. Second, a quarterly bulletin to review the new work of the society's members. Third, an annual convention which the doctors could gather and discuss new developments in the field. Fourth, free access to a laboratory for clinical research (mostly likely to be located in New York). Fifth, and last, access to a "first class laboratory expert [who] will be employed by the Society, competent to conduct physiological and pathological investigations". It is unclear if this society every really got off the ground as there appears to be no record of it, and the announcement also does state that "it is the common interest of all to enlist a large membership, as no other course will permit the benefits to be gathered and placed before each of us as needed." . Measures 6" x 3 1/2" (folded), 7" x 6" (unfolded).. Dr. Samuel Howard Monell was a doctor who promoted and practiced electro-therapeutics, which uses electricity as a means of alleviation and curing of diseases. Monell specifically used static electricity in his treatments, and he claimed that it could cure acne, lesions, insomnia, abnormal blood pressure, depression and hysteria. Electro-therapeutics is actually still a therapy used today, though mainly in the field of physical rehabilitation.
Dr. V. M. Pierce Dream Book, Bridal Superstitions. World's Dispensary Medical Association.Buffalo, NY.[1920] Dr. W. Handy A Valuable Simple Recipe, for the Relief of Salt Rheum, and other Skin Diseases. .Providence, RI.[1870]
A short booklet by Dr. V. M. Pierce, that in addition to advertisements for his various patent medicines, also has information on dream interoperation and bridal superstitions. Occurring to the booklet, in dreams different objects meant different things, and even the same object in different contexts could mean various things. For example, "A Bear - To dream that you have seen a bear means you have a rich, cruel, and audacious enemy. If it is running, happiness for you.", "Blood - If you see blood, it's a good sign. You will fall heir to riches. To lose blood signifies sorrow and disappointment.", and "Hills - To dream of climbing and traveling over hills signifies good." The bridal superstitions listed are both to tell if someone will be married soon, and how to ensure a blessed marriage. For example, a white pigeon near a house means that someone within will be married within a year, also, when leaving the church after the wedding ceremony, one must be sure to step out with the right foot first, or risk bad luck. The majority of the book is actually taken up by testimonials of different woman who were cured using Dr. Pierce's products. Some of the titles of these testimonials are: "Nerves in Bad Condition, Could Not Sleep, Back Ached - Took Favorite Prescription" "Was Confined to Bed Four Weeks - Now Does Housework Easily", and "Stomach Too Weak to Digest Food, Medical Discovery Gave Relief". At the back of the booklet are two tear out pages, one is a blank form for the reader to fill out so that they might get a free medical consultations, and the other is to order the book "The People's Common Sense Medical Advise, Complete Edition." The front cover features an image of two women consulting an old man with a book on symbolism in dreams. 32 pgs. Staple binding. OCLC 8 (Jan 2020) Measures 5 1/2" x 4". A recipe homeopathic medicine that would supposed provide relief for 'salt rheum and other skin diseases". Salt Rheum was the popular term for any cutaneous (skin) eruptions, like eczema. The recipe involved the use of molasses, water, and various roots such as yellow dock, Spanish sarsaparilla and Prince Pine, that would simmer over heat for two days until a syrup would form. then iodide of potassium was added. This medicine was to be taken oral every day, with the exception of the Sabbath, when one should take a cool bath instead. This recipe and others could be obtained at Dr. W. Handy's in Providence, RI. The recipe itself is printed on a small flyer and is surrounded by a decorative print border. Single-sided. Measures 6 3/4" x 3".
Eraus Brodie Circular for The  Miraculous Cure for Corns. Rhoads & Harris, Wholesale Druggists.Philadelphia.[1900] Evelina Reaveley The Tall Pines, A Summer Camp for Girls. Tall Pines Camp.Bennington, NH.[1924]
In small printed across the top of the page "magna est veritas et praevalebit" followed by The  Miraculous Cure for Corns.  A narrative from the inventor follows on how the cure was invented and how a corn can negatively impact one's life.   Followed by Directions for Use and Memoranda including - This Plaster must not be carried in the pocket or kept in any warm place... Made in London, distributed in Philadelphia.  Reverse is blank. Measures 9 3/4" x 7 1/4". . The majority of the booklet is comprised of approximately forty (40) printed black and white images from photographs of young girls of varying ages engaged in a variety of activities all over the camp's grounds. Nearly every photograph comes with a caption, sometimes a brief few words, and other times several sentences describing the corresponding picture. At the center of the booklet is a large fold out page full of photographs of the campers. The camp itself was located next to Lake George and comprised of a junior play house, recreation house, wooden bungalows for sleeping, dinning room, and kitchen. There were a large variety of activities for the girls to do, such as: arts and crafts, folk dancing and pageantry, boating and canoeing, gardening, nature study, community work, hikes and climbs, horseback riding, camp cooking, canning and 'roughing it', which was when the girls would go camping with no tent (unless there was rain) and sleep under the stars. There was also a variety of sports available to partake in such as: tennis, volley ball, basket ball, baseball, swimming and diving. Campers were required to wear a uniform, "Dark blue bloomers (plaited very full). Middy, white or unbleached. White hat. Red tie. Tan or black shoes and stockings. Sweater, red, blue or white preferred." The camp stressed a well balanced diet, and had dietitians who lived at the camp who were in charge of all meals. Cakes and sweets were not allowed to be sent to campers by their parents. The cost of the camp for the summer was $300 with horseback riding, or $275 without, with some extra charges for special day trips or arts & crafts. A small section in the brochure is dedicated to the Tall Pines Club, a separate camp located nearby for girls over 18 years of age, and there are instructions on how to send away for more information on this club. Also included is a list of current head counselors and staff, several pages of references, with addresses, of families who had sent their daughters to the camp in years prior, and a page of excerpts from parents' letters praising the camp. Lastly there is a tear away application for the camp at the end of the booklet. 45 pg. (including 2 fold out pages), with printed white wrappers. Staple binding. Printed by: F. S. & A. H. McKenzie. OCLC 2 (June 2020). Measures 8 1/4" x 6" (booklet), 32" x 5 3/4" (fold out page).. The Tall Pines Camp for girls was run by the siblings Evelina, John, and Catherine Reaveley, in Bennington, NH. Tall Pines Camp was for girls ages 7 to 18, with a Tall Pine Club for girls over 18, and campers were meant to stay the entire summer, from June 29th to August 31.
Florence Fleming Noyes 2 Circulars - The Noyes School of Rhythm for Children - Summer Camp. Cobalt, CT .1927 J. S. Baughman, Osteopath Osteopath Appointment Card. .Burlington, IA.[1905]
The first single-fold brochure has an image from a photograph of the gateway to the camp. In its fifteenth season.  It asks the these questions "Have you thought what kind of a summer you would like your children to have? Would it be something like this? That they be outdoors most of the day, in the meadow of an old Connecticut farm that slopes to a lake with wooded hills beyond? That they start the day with a Rhythm class in a big, open Barn overlooking the sparkling lake below? That they spend quiet, cool hours in an old shed, with clay, paint or dyes, which take on new meaning after Rhythm work? That they find evenings and rainy days perhaps the best of all, when they gather around big logs crackling and blazing in the fireplace in the Barn? And many more.  This is followed by comments from pleased parents at summers end., A second image of children in gossamer white gowns playing in a field. A pictorial map and basic info about the separate camps for Women and Girls and Men and Boys. The second is eight fold out pages with extensive information on the camp, testimonials, order of the day pricing, pictorial maps, peaceful images from photographs and gossamer gowned women "in a masque".  Pages are 8 1/2" x 5".. Created by Florence Fleming Noyes in the early 1900’s, Noyes Rhythm is a movement system that brings ease and strength to your body, while opening you up to great creativity in art and life. Many people, all ages, dancers and non-dancers, have come to Noyes Rhythm to relieve stiffness, tiredness, and loss of inspiration. The work combines a system of physical techniques and improvisatory explorations, encouraging subtle internal awareness, all supported by live music. The techniques build core strength, release unwanted tension, and encourage coordination, alignment and balance. Our movement always reflects the elements of nature. It is an organic approach that asks us to feel the breath of the forest, the ripples of the water, the rolling gait of the bear. We can get beyond our physical limitations and move together in universal rhythms. The Noyes system also affects our whole selves by inviting us ‘shed’ what we don’t need and find fresh resources for our spirit. Combining the grace and spontaneity of childhood with the clarity and discipline of maturity, Noyes Rhythm work connects us to the same strength that flows through all living things. A religious service mainly of song and often of a joyous informal nature.  The school is still in existence. A 2 1/2" x 4" appointment reminder or scheduling card.  This particular patient seemingly saw the osteopath three days a week for a prolonged period. Of interest is the Seven Don't on the reverse. They include Don't think and talk about your ailments, Don't over-eat, or eat too fast, chew your food, Don't sleep in a closed room without ventilation, or sit in a draft, Don't neglect your regular osteopathic treatments until well, and you will be happy and able to make others happy around you. etc..
Jimmy Chew: A Dental Health Book Designed to Help Children to Take Better Care of Their Teeth John W. Wanamaker Stock Share Certificate for the Bethany Building, A Fundraising Campaign to Enlarge the Bethany's Presbyterian Church. Bethany's Presbyterian Church.Philadelphia, PA.October 23, 1874
31 pp. booklet aimed at encouraging primary grade age children to take care of their teeth. The story and the character of Jimmy Chew, a sixth year molar, are based on the Toothland Puppet Show. The booklet starts with a young boy named Fred going to the dentist, and the dentist telling Fred a story of how to take care of his new molar. The story centers around the "Big Four", which are: 1) Right Food, 2) Chewing Exercises 3) Clean Teeth, and 4) Your Dentist. The black and white illustrations in the booklet are supposedly the ones the dentist is drawing to engage Fred, and all told there are nine (9) illustrations as well as two (2) black and white printed photographs of the Toothland Puppet Show. At the end there is an additional short story of Sammy Grinder (a decayed tooth that belonged to a boy named Ed), additional questions for teachers or parents to ask their students or children, and Jimmy Chew's Favorite Song. Orange printed wrappers. Staple Binding. 9th Edition. OCLC 0 (Oct. 2020, other edition are in OCLC). Measures 5 1/2" x 4 1/2". A stock share certificate for the fundraising campaign for the enlargement of "Bethany Building" where the Bethany School and church were located.  A part of this campaign was that with the payment of one dollar, an individual was given a share in the enlargement, as well as a certificate denoting that. The certificates were printed in red ink, with a simple double lined red border, and with spaces provided in the text to fill out the donor name, date, and certificate number. The certificates were also signed by the Treasurer, Sam M. Clement, countersigned by Mrs. W. J. Ferguson, and by Wanamaker himself as the Superintendent. The certificate also features a black and white engraving of the Bethany Building, though whether this is an artist's rendition of the what the expanded would look like, or the original building is unknown. This certificate was purchased by Sallie Maull. Bethany School School would grow to be the largest Sunday School in the nation, and the church associated with the school is still in existence today, and is known as the Bethany Church Evangelical Presbyterian and is now located in Haventown, PA. Single page, single sided. Measures 9" x 5 1/4".. The Bethany School was founded in 1859 and its mission was to educate the children of local area, who were mostly from poor families. The school was founded by E. H. Toland, a missionary from the American Sunday School Union and John Wanamaker (1838-1922) who was an American merchant. Wanamaker was also a religious, civic, and political figure, and was perhaps most well known for being a pioneer in marketing. Within two years of its founding, the school had grown to over 230 students with 17 teachers and went from a single rented room to its own building in the neighborhood. In 1865 the school had over 900 students and Wanamaker had decided to again move the school to a larger location and this time add a church. By 1874, the school and church were again too small to meet the community's needs, and a fundraising campaign to enlarge the "Bethany Building" began.
Joniah Allen Rockbridge Alum Springs Letterhead. Rockbridge Alum Springs.Rockbridge Alum Springs, VA.August 16, 1891 Joseph E. Meyer Indiana Botanical Gardens Product Catalogue. Indiana Botanical Gardens.Hammond ID.[1925]
A letter by Joniah Allen written on Rockbridge Alum Springs Grand Hotel Stationary. The hotel was a mountain resort know for its "celebrated waters", or more actually the mineral water found there. The top right of the page has a red engraving of the hotel itself, with a caption below that states "Capacity 1,300 Guests; Gas, Electric Bells, and all other modern improvements. Telegraph, post and express offices all on premises." Below that is long listing of testimonials of previous guests and doctors extolling on the wondrous healing waters a the hotel. Some excerpts are: "I would state that I regard it as one of the most efficient astringent and tonic mineral waters which I have ever employed" and "In truth I know of no waters in Europe or America so rich in medical substances as that of Rockbridge Springs". The text of the letter is inconsequential.  Measures 11" x 8 1/2". 128 pp catalogue of herbal based products, creams, compounds, oils, liquids, plain bark, leaves, flowers and seeds. Narrative descriptions including uses ingredients and directions along with pricing information. A plethora of uses from disease, to shampoo and health maintenance. In-text illustrations throughout .  Measures 6 1/2" x 2 3/4".. The history of the Indiana Botanic Gardens, Inc., begins in 1910 with the founding of the company by Joseph E. Meyer. Joseph desired to have a business of his own, preferably something in the printing industry. Giving consideration to his set of skills, Joseph realized that he knew a great deal about printing and even more about nature. A company that sold herbs through a catalog would be a profitable endeavor for Joseph Meyer thanks to his possession of an old printing press and vast knowledge of natural remedies. It was with the blending of these two passions that gave birth to Indiana Botanic Gardens, Inc. The early bindery at Indiana Botanic Gardens, initially called the Indiana Herb Gardens, began in a small cottage in the rear of Joseph Meyer’s Hammond, Indiana home where he started growing and harvesting plants in a vacant lot. In the beginning, the business barely made living expenses for the family. Meyer’s children assisted him with activities like gathering herbs from nearby fields, packaging boxes, feeding the printing press, and binding catalogs with needle and thread.In 1918, the 400-page book, The Herbalist was printed and business expanded. Since the company was now able to sustain itself, it moved from Meyer’s cottage to a more formal and larger building off of Calumet Avenue in Hammond (pictured on the right). The same year that The Herbalist went into publication, Joseph purchased a wild tract of land on the Little Calumet River. The land held a profusion of medicinal plants and virgin forest. In 1926, a beautiful English gabled building was built. This became the home of the newly named Indiana Botanic Gardens, Inc.
Manuscript Cures for Hydrophobia & Cancer. .. Mr. and Mrs. J. Halsey Gulick The Luther Gluck Camps - Guide, Yearbook, Cover letter - Girls Camps. Evans Printers.Concord NH.1952-53
A 10" x 6" page that appears to have been removed from a ledger or journal with two entries that appear to be in different hands. The first is a cure for hydrophobia that entails mixing elecampane root, a puff of madder and a quart of new milk brought to boil in a water bath.  This mixture is taken multiple times for several days. The second is a cure for cancer using white ash branches that have been burned to ash, making a strong lye boil as strong as possible, with lard and flour to make a plaster.Applied to Cancer for 48 hours "the torture endured by the patient is something horrible".  This is followed by a half-strength plaster for three weeks, at the end of which "the cancer can be drawn out with ease and the patient is cured" Reverse is blank.  No indication as to author, date, local etc.  c1880s.. A small format 20 pp brochure with illustrated wraps.  The three camps are located in Saco ME and include Sebago Wohelo: Girls 12 to 17 years, Little Wohelo: Girls 6 to 12 years and Timanous: Boys 6 to 14 years.  Descriptions of each camp including references to many of the Native American crafts and iconography of the Camp Fire Girls organization throughout.  An overview on the types of activities, accommodations etc. Measures 7 3/4" x 5 1/3".  The second is the "yearbook" for The Luther Gulick Camps - Summer of 1952". Suth Casco, ME. Consists of captioned images of photographs of the campers and their activities only. Measures 9 1/4" x 6 1/2".   The final piece in this lot is a cover letter to a potential campers mother.  Again, note the Campfire Girl iconography on the left margin. . The camp was founded in 1908 by Dr. and Mrs. Luther Halsey Gulick, the camps for the past 25 years have been under the direction of their son, J. Halsey Gulick and his wife, a former camper and counselor. Luther Gulick, who founded the Campfire Girls along with his wife Charlotte.
Mrs. G. W. Andrews Promotional Pamphlet - Wau-Kaun-Zee-Kah Camp, Merrimac, Wis. State Highways 81 abd 113 Lake Wisconsin. Baraboo, Wis... Ninth Annual Report, of the Managers of the New York Institution for the Blind, to the Legislature of the State, Made in Conformity to Law.  January, 1845.
A single-fold pamphlet with sepia toned images from photographs of the camp, points of interest and activities.  Named for the noted Winnebago Chieftain "Yellow Thunder".  Begins with a verse titled Wau-Kaun-Zee-Kah by Samuel A. Cooper.  A caption at the base  reads "Cottages and Garages for Rent" (Mrs. G. W. Andrews, Baraboo, Wis.)  This is followed by an over view of the camp with specific information on fishing and boating and bathing. Image of the "Owl's Head" on back cover.  Also includes an advertisement for The State Bank of Merrimac.  Measures 7 1/4" x 5".. 36 pp  Ninth Annual Report, of the Managers of the New York Institution for the Blind, to the Legislature of the State, Made in Conformity to Law.  January, 1845.
Norman Carr, M. D. Birth Control, Plain Medical Information. Lanteen Laboratories, INC.,  under the auspices Medical Bureaus of Information on Birth Control.Chicago, IL.1934 Palmer's Manual of Cage Birds Presented by Solon Palmers Perfumer & Toilet Soap Makers. Solon.New York.1879
A short 22pp booklet about the different methods of birth control available to women in the 1930s. This booklet attempts to straddle a very fine line between the moral and religious ideals, and women's reproductive rights, however it often manages to contradict itself in doing so. It starts off by saying that "Motherhood is the grandest, richest and the most glorious experience which may occur in a woman's life.... it is too wonderful to treat it lightly and too sacred to thrust it upon a woman against her will...", which appears to be a very pro-life woman's right stance in regard to all women, regardless of circumstance. However it soon becomes very clear that this stance is only considered moral and ethical by them under very strict conditions: "those few who still say they are opposed to Birth Control are often very ignorant of the problem about which they attempt to argue.... they often do not distinguish between Birth Control and abortion.... Birth Control, as advocated by ethical persons and organizations, is not meant for the illicit use of the unmarried, but is designed for the protection of the health and happiness of married couple... Birth Control in marriage is not a religious question, it is a matter of economics and health." After this outlining of when birth control should be used, the booklet proceeds to describe the various methods of birth control, and the pros and cons of each. Methods that are not recommended are: inter-uterine stems often called gold buttons or wishbones (a pre cursory to today's modern hormonal IUDs), douching, withdrawal, suppositories, and male condoms (because "in most cases it is unsatisfactory to one or both parties, occasionally harmful; and due to defective material, especially the cheaper kind, it often fails as a contra-ceptive", a position that is currently recognized as untrue). Next the booklet continues on to recommended two different types of birth control methods, though first they do stress that any and all of these methods must be done before intercourse starts. The first approved method recommended is contra-ceptive jelly, which in order to use, one must determine what class of woman you are.  "First class" women are "brides and wives who have not yet borne a child or suffered a miscarriage", and therefore can just smear the jelly over one's cervix. Second class women, women who have only had one child and suffered no "birth damage" to the cervix, might be able to just use the contra-ceptive jelly, but probably should use it with a tampon or cap, and third class women are those who have had more than one child or birth damage and then must use the jelly with a tampon or cap. The second approved method is the diaphragm, often called the female condom, which according to the the 1930 International Conference on Birth Control, it is "the best known method of contra-ception." Next the booklet provides information on the Medical Bureaus of Information on Birth Control who had medical offices in Chicago and Detroit where women could attend free lectures on birth control and also would be able to see only female physicians. A short section on the "Legal and Ethical" practices of birth control follow, which essentially state that birth control is not illegal and that "one of the moral reasons for the practice of Birth Control is that it eliminates the dangers of illegal abortions".  Lastly there are four pages of advertisements for Lanteen Birth control products themselves, such as their various jellies, tampons and caps. The booklet contains several illustrations of the products, diagrams on how to use them, and three small illustrations of the cervix so that a woman can better understand the different classes of women.  Illustrated wrappers. Staple binding. OCLC 2  (APR 2020) Measures 6 3/4" x 3 1/4".. A 32 pp booklet providing information how to catch  and tame birds, bird food, cages, breeding, extensive information on diseases and remedies followed by general remarks, the canary, breeding, singing, molting and varieties.  The remainder of the book focuses on Palmer's products including perfumes, soaps, lotions and other remedies.  Illustrated covers.  Measures 4 3/4" x 3 1/4". .
Presbyterian Hospital Annual Report and Fundraising appeal. Presbyterian Hospital.New York. NY.1908 Promotional Brochure - The Bungalow Camp Life Club - Pine Woods & Ocean Air. ..c1915
16 (unnumbered) pp. Printed on lightly polished paper.  Images from photographs throughout of staff assisting patients, mostly the indigent. The narration begins with acknowledgment of the trend in hospital work toward scientific exactness, and the keeping of fuller  records of all symptoms and treatment of the patient followed by two pages of examples.  This is intended to explain the rising costs of medical care. This is followed by information on the Dispensary, Tuberculosis Work, Ambulance Service and Emergency Ward, Visiting Nursing Services, Katie Geitz Kitchen for instructing and feeding the indigent.  The booklet concludes with information on the School of Nursing and a chart outlining hospital utilization comparing 1908 to 1907. Measures 7 3/4" x 5 1/4".. A 14 pp booklet promoting the outdoor life in two locations - June 15-Sept 10th Eliot ME and Dec 1 - April 15 Green Acre SC. Images from photographs throughout.  The camp was open to any one who wished to live a simple and sane life out-of-doors, to study and practice those things which make for health and happiness.  Included family and boy's camps.  Rates for a family $15 per week.  Guests' Applications were not exclusive but congenial - suggested introduction from former guests or if inconvenient contact the camp directly.  Measures 8 1//4" x 6". .
Prospectus and Promotional materials for selling Egyptian Regulator Tea. ..c1900 R. J. Levis, M. D. Handbill Advertisement for Levis Metallic Splints. .Philadelphia, PA.[1890]
24 pp prospectus and promotional brochure encouraging individuals to become sales agent for the Egyptian Drug Company selling Egyptian Regulator Tea. A buy low, sell high scheme including illustrations and text promoting the teas effect on indigestion, pimple, boils, old sores, ulcers, dyspepsia, corpulency, sick headache, rheumatism, nervous debility, neuralgia and premature old age.  Additionally includes numerous testimonials. The back cover depicts a scene on the plantations of the Egyptian Drug company, at Karnak, Upper Egypt.  Additionally, includes an order form and a single fold pamphlet titled "The Secret of Beauty"  with before and after illustrations to be disseminated with the product.  With original envelope.  Brochures measure8 1/2" x 6". . A two-sided handbill promoting the 'Levis' Metallic Splint' which were made from copper and as such much lighter and comfortable than the other options of the day, which were mostly made out of wood. The circular was advertising a set of 21 pieces for $15 and features splints to be used for various finger, arm, or leg injurious. The splints in the set came in both child and adult sized. There are seven illustrated examples of the splints in use. The creator of this splints was Richard J. Levis, a Civil War doctor who was a surgeon at the Pennsylvania Hospital. While the there is no date on the circular, Leach & Greene appear to have been in business at the Tremont Street location in the late 1880 to the early 1890s. Some of the same illustrations found on the circular were also used in a variety of medical supply catalogues around the same time. Single sheet, double-sided, green paper. Measures 9 3/4" x 5 3/4".
Receipt to make Elixer (sic) for the Bilious Cholic - which has also been found very useful in Agues to carry of the Bile. ..[1810] Recreation Department Pictures of a White Mountain Camp, A Summer Resort Brochure. The Outlook Company.New York, NY.[1910]
A manuscript receipt listing all of the necessary ingredients with an explanation on processing "let them stand in a warm place" and when done mix equal parts of Brandy -- take half a wine glass morning and night. "Receipt to make Elixer(sic)  for the Cholic & Ague".  Written on laid paper. Measures 8" x 6 1/2". . Fryeburg-on-the-Saco was a summer resort open from July 1st to October 1st in Fryeburg, ME. While technically it was a summer resort, it was a particular resort that is hard to accurately define. This is something the place recognizes itself, and indeed starts of the brochure with: "A Camp? Perhaps that term describes it as well as any one term can. The fact is that its uniqueness prevents the accurate use of a name which could be applied elsewhere. An assembly, a settlement, a summer school, a family of families -each of these names and a dozen others succeeds in standing for only one side of the life which is pleasantly associated in the minds of many with the banks of the Saco and the shady trees of old Fryeburg." The camp was also home to several organizations such as the Fryeburg School of Method, the Fryeburg School of Theology and the Church, the Maine Chautauqua Union, and the Sunday School Institute and Bible School. The camp contain several buildings, Normal Hall for classes, Grove House for its offices, an auditorium where daily lectures or concerts were held, cottages for the guests, and a dining hall. The camp's drinking and bathing water all came from one well on the property that was fed by a mineral spring. Throughout the brochure are fifteen (15) printed photographs of the grounds, building, Saco River and White Mountains. 24 pgs. Green printed wrappers. Staple binding. Measures 7 1/2" x 6".
Synopsis of a Course of Lectures on Anatomy and Surgery.  Magnus Falconar  London 1777 T.K. Taylor. The Pocket Physician or Domestic Medical Adviser; Designed for both Married & Single; . . Boston. 1852
238 pp. marbles cover with leather spine, text interspersed with blank pages. Synopsis describes medical procedures for surgery and the anatomy of the human body. It is separated into four lectures, Introduction to the Study of Anatomy, Osteology, Myology, and Angiology. 8 1/2" x 5" Some missing pages at front, inscribed and has hand written notes, foxing throughout, wear on cover 128 pp. Blue blind stamp gilt cover, 27 page introduction, index in back of book. Common symptoms, and treatments. Contains a catalog of medicines. The book covers very personal ailments and situations such as abortion, masturbation, conception, and menstruation as well as more acceptable discussions as asthma, heartburn, and palpitations. 4 1/2" x 3" some staining on cover, some foxing, spine loosening in areas, hand corrected address on title page and page 98's advertisement for the reader
The Blood Washing Method:a restorative and creative revelation for ideal perfection. Dr. Benedict Lust Publishing Co..New YOrk.1923 The Milwaukee Social Hygiene Society
Popular. Edition.  Lesson 1. 26 pp. Stiff wrap with image from photograph of Lust.  The treatment includes a show with a special shower head at 8 to 14 feet with special attention to the stomach and intestine, followed by a bath, an "internal bath", the consumption of "Inner-Clean" taken daily, following Ehret's Mucusless Diet and much more.  This is follwed by pages of diagrams illustrating the tehnic(sp) of the Blood-Washing Method. This is only part one.  Part II begins on page 13. The inside covers promote "Yungborn", in Butler NJ - The Original Nature Cure Resort and Recreation Home, Dr. Lust's Health Resort, Tangerine FLA and a promotion for Lust "A Dignified Profession -- Doctor of Naturopathy.  The last pages of the book promote such things as Cure by Water - The Kneipp Method,  The Nature Method of Healing by F. E. Bliz, and much more.  Measures 9 1/2" x 6 1/2".  Fading on cover.. Dr. Benedict Lust. President of the American Naturopathic Association, Dean American School of Naturopathy and Editor of "Naturopath" Magazine. A short booklet announcing the formation of the the Milwaukee Social Hygiene Society, its goals, current members, constitution and by-laws. 10 pgs. Printed cream wrappers. Staple bindings. OCLC 1 (Sept. 2020). Measures 6 1/4" x 3 1/4".

The society was a part of the social hygiene movement that started in the late 19th century and had gained a lot of traction by the 1910s and remained prevalent throughout the 20th century. Specifically, the movement was an attempt by progressive-era reformers to control sexually transmitted diseases, prostitution, and immoral or deviant behavior. The movement, and by extension the Milwaukee Social Hygiene Society, promoted sexual education and believed that "numerous aspects of the phenomena of sex are central in the biological, psychic and social life of the human race... to that end all sex processes may be normal, beautiful, healthful, and beneficial." Of course this acceptance of sex as normal and beautiful came with the caveat that it was to only occur between a married couple, and as such another one of the society's goals was "that such social institutions as marriage and the home are to be protected from degradation and disintegration, that standards of public and individual morality are to be high, that health is to be safer, and that life is to be happier because it is ore intelligent, more free from disease, and more abundant in all its expressions and manifestations." Beyond the fact that it was founded in 1916, and a few references dating into the late 1910s, little information was found on the Milwaukee Social Hygiene Society. However it was affiliated with the American Social Hygiene Association (now known as the American Sexual Health Association or ASHA) which is still in existence today.

The New Jersey Medical Reporter: A Monthly Journal of Medical and Surgical,.  Whole No. 57.  January 1855.  Vol VIII. No. 1. The Trained Nurse and Hospital Review. Lakeside Publishing Co.New York.9741
50 pp   Whole No. 57.  January 1855.  Vol VIII. No. 1.  The New Jersey Medical Reporter: A Monthly Journal of Medical and Surgical Science, edited by S. W. Butler, M.D 111 pp journal on nursing. The 'Trained Nurse and Hospital Review' was the pioneer nursing publication in American and it ran from 1893 to 1950. This item is the September 1926 issue. The front cover features a photograph of Stella Boothe Vail (a prominent nurse of the times and a specialist in children's health and hygiene) done by H. W. Simmons. Some of the articles in this issue are: "The Nurse's Part in Prenatal Care", "Helps in Pediatric Nursing", "Nutrition Forum: Food to Tempt Children's Appetites", and "A Guiding Code of Ethics in Nursing Relationships." Item includes a newspaper article on Stella Booth from the NY Sun Globe, March 1924. Measures 10" x 6 3/4" (journal), 9 3/4" x 7" (newspaper article) . Minor cover wear. Pages are toned due to age. The article has red pencil on the bottom detailing the name and date of the newspaper.
Victor H Lindlahr [Editor] Set of Three Issues of Journal of Living, No. 21,25,38. Journal of Living Publishing Corp.New York, NY.1943
These three issues, all under 25 pages, help the reader stay healthy through eating properly, and often provide meal guides or lists of food items that provide specific nutrients, like rice contain vitamin B1 or Brussels sprouts containing vitamin C. The issues in this set are: No. 21 For Women after 40, No. 25 Eat to Stay Young, and No. 38 How to Use Vegetables as Medicines. All of them are edited by Victor Lindlahr (1897-1969) was an American radio presenter and health food writer. He is perhaps most famous for authoring a book in 1940 called "You are What You Eat". Measures 7 1/4" x 5 1/4"..