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 Diabetes; When the human engine does not properly burn its fuel". Metropolitan Life..c1925 Advertising Trade Card
6 pp. Image of man fueling a furnace on front cover.   Discusses the fuel our bodies need, diabetes - its signs and causes, how insulin helps the diabetic and how to guard against diabetes.  One of the ways to guard against diabetes is "Infections of teeth, tonsils and other organs should be promptly treated and removed".   Hmmm..  Measures 7 3/4" x 5 3/8".. Adv trade card or business card for The Marks Adjustable Folding Chair Company Sole inventors, manufactures and proprietors of Surgical and Gynecological Chairs
Advertising Leaflet Ninth Annual Report, of the Managers of the New York Institution for the Blind, to the Legislature of the State, Made in Conformity to Law.  January, 1845.
A flyer for Glyco-Thymoline, an alkaline antiseptic for the efficient treatment of inflammatory conditions of mucous membrane in all parts of the body, by Kress & Wren Company. 36 pp  Ninth Annual Report, of the Managers of the New York Institution for the Blind, to the Legislature of the State, Made in Conformity to Law.  January, 1845.
The New Jersey Medical Reporter: A Monthly Journal of Medical and Surgical,.  Whole No. 57.  January 1855.  Vol VIII. No. 1. A Treatise on Indigestion and its Consequences, called Nervous and Bilious Complaints; with Observations on the Organic Diseases, in which some they sometimes terminate.  A.P.W. Philip James Crissy Philadelphia 1824
50 pp   Whole No. 57.  January 1855.  Vol VIII. No. 1.  The New Jersey Medical Reporter: A Monthly Journal of Medical and Surgical Science, edited by S. W. Butler, M.D 195 pp. Brown leather cover, no illustrations, Fourth Edition with some additional observations. A Treatise on Indigestion contains information and observations relating to the physical ailments. The chapters list the symptoms, causes, treatments of first, second, and third stages of indigestion. 8 3/4" x 5 1/2" wear on cover, foxing throughout, one page has torn edge but does not effect text, possible water damage on lower right side, inscribed
 Clark's ABC Almanac or Anti-Bilious Compound. R.C & C. S. Clark, Operative Chemists..1877 Palmer's Manual of Cage Birds Presented by Solon Palmers Perfumer & Toilet Soap Makers. Solon.New York.1879
32 (unnumbered) pp including standard almanac information  and information on numerous diseases and maladies with presumed cures by using the anit-bilious compound.  Some of the conditions addressed include Digestion, Dyspepsia, Loss of Appetite, Chronic Diarrhoea, The Liver, etc.  Additional testimonials on the back inside cover. Measures. A 32 pp booklet providing information how to catch  and tame birds, bird food, cages, breeding, extensive information on diseases and remedies followed by general remarks, the canary, breeding, singing, molting and varieties.  The remainder of the book focuses on Palmer's products including perfumes, soaps, lotions and other remedies.  Illustrated covers.  Measures 4 3/4" x 3 1/4". .
Read for your Life!  Consumption can be Cured by Dr. Schenck's Treatment. Dr. J. H. Schenck & Son .Philadelphia.[1880]  Business Cards - Dentistry - Surgeon and Mechanical, Veterinary. .New York.c1900
32 pp. wraps. First page titled "A Positive Cure for Consumption" explaining consumption, the origin of consumption, the tubercle, the various stages, the symptoms including cough, wasting away, hemorrhages, night sweats and hectic cheeks, poor appetite and bad digestion and diarrhea and of course, how Schenck's product will cure the same.  Measures 7" x 5". . Two (2) different business cards for very different dentists in New York. One for a Veterinary Dentist operating on diseases of the teeth  for coughing, frothing at mouth, discharge at nose, hide bound, scouring, running at eyes, tossing head, driving on one line, cribbing, bolting, baulking, shying, etc. The second card  for R. Bogardus is for a surgeon and mechanical dentist in Brooklyn. Reverse is blank. Larger card measures 3" x 4 3/4". .
 Songs, Jokes, Definitons of Dreams, Language of Flowers, Etc. Etc,. Grafton Medicine Co..St. Louis Mo.. Joniah Allen Rockbridge Alum Springs Letterhead. Rockbridge Alum Springs.Rockbridge Alum Springs, VA.August 16, 1891
A 32 pp booklet printed by the maker of Dr. Henry's World's Tonic and Blood Purifer and Dr Henry's Root and Plant Pills. Available for two three-cent postage stamps. An array of popular interests of the day including wood-cut engravings with children's verses, songs with music and verse, Language of Flowers, Marriage Guidance, Facts about the Bible, Language of the Handkerchief, Definition of Dreams and of course many testimonials for the products.  Back cover is a wood cut of a stylized bird with a talk bubble that reads "Quack"  creating a potent while chanting a verse about quackery and why you should use Dr. Henry's instead. Measures 4 3/4" x 3 1/4".. A letter by Joniah Allen written on Rockbridge Alum Springs Grand Hotel Stationary. The hotel was a mountain resort know for its "celebrated waters", or more actually the mineral water found there. The top right of the page has a red engraving of the hotel itself, with a caption below that states "Capacity 1,300 Guests; Gas, Electric Bells, and all other modern improvements. Telegraph, post and express offices all on premises." Below that is long listing of testimonials of previous guests and doctors extolling on the wondrous healing waters a the hotel. Some excerpts are: "I would state that I regard it as one of the most efficient astringent and tonic mineral waters which I have ever employed" and "In truth I know of no waters in Europe or America so rich in medical substances as that of Rockbridge Springs". The text of the letter is inconsequential.  Measures 11" x 8 1/2".
Dr. H.H. Green's Sons, Dropsy Specialists Green's Dropsy Remedy Information and Account Book. Franklin Printing & Publishing Co..Atlanta, GA.1899 Receipt to make Elixer (sic) for the Bilious Cholic - which has also been found very useful in Agues to carry of the Bile. ..[1810]
36pp. Illustrated wraps. Images from photographs of the "sons" on the front cover. A combination promotional booklet and calendar and notebook.  Approximately 2/3 of the booklet is dedicated to product information and testimonials on the Dr. H. H. Green's Sons' treatment and relief of dropsy (edema) and their other products.  The remaining pages are combined calendar month pages for 1900 and 1901 and blank lines for notes.  The top of each page has a small promotion such as "Green's Sons' Chill Specific will cure you of the worst case of chills".  Measures 5 3/4" x 3 1/2".  . A manuscript receipt listing all of the necessary ingredients with an explanation on processing "let them stand in a warm place" and when done mix equal parts of Brandy -- take half a wine glass morning and night. "Receipt to make Elixer(sic)  for the Cholic & Ague".  Written on laid paper. Measures 8" x 6 1/2". .
 Information to the Public - Dr. R. C. Flowers Remedies  - Liver and Stomach Sanative, Lung Cordial, Catarrh Remedy,  Pain Destroying Elixir, etc.... ..1884  Business Cards - Cancer Specialists - Cured without Knives. .Mound Valley, KS and Allentown, PA.c1900
24 pp. Illustrated wrap with image of R. C. Flower on the front cover and "Hygeia of the 19th Cent" on reverse.  A free to the public narrative introducing the company, the science in the preparation and skillful combinations.  This is followed by detailed information  on each of the companies numerous products with only the use of different type face for embellishment.  It concludes with Testimonials.  The inside back cover is a price list and includes Liver and Stomach Sanative, Lung Cordial, Catarrh Remedy, Blood Purifier, Pain Destroying Elixir, Nerve Pills and Magnetic Plasters.  Measures 8 3/4" x 5 3/4". . Two (2) different business cards for cancer specialists, both claiming to cure cancer without the use of knives. Dr. Baynham also advises he also does not use caustic and plaster.  Reverse is blank. Larger card measures 2 1/2" x 4 1/2". .
The Trained Nurse and Hospital Review. Lakeside Publishing Co.New York.9741  Osteopathic Health: Good Health to All this Dear, Vol 53 No. 1,  What Osteopathy Does for Women, etc.. American Osteopathic Assn,.Chicago, IL.10228
111 pp journal on nursing. The 'Trained Nurse and Hospital Review' was the pioneer nursing publication in American and it ran from 1893 to 1950. This item is the September 1926 issue. The front cover features a photograph of Stella Boothe Vail (a prominent nurse of the times and a specialist in children's health and hygiene) done by H. W. Simmons. Some of the articles in this issue are: "The Nurse's Part in Prenatal Care", "Helps in Pediatric Nursing", "Nutrition Forum: Food to Tempt Children's Appetites", and "A Guiding Code of Ethics in Nursing Relationships." Item includes a newspaper article on Stella Booth from the NY Sun Globe, March 1924. Measures 10" x 6 3/4" (journal), 9 3/4" x 7" (newspaper article) . Minor cover wear. Pages are toned due to age. The article has red pencil on the bottom detailing the name and date of the newspaper. A volume of the journal of Osteopathic Health that focuses on women's health and how osteopathy can help. Osteopathy is a system of medical practice based on the theory that diseases are mostly due to loss of structural integrity of the body which can be restored by careful manipulation. There are six articles in this volume entitled: Dr. [Andrew] Still's Words of Hope, The Price of New Lives, Osteopathy and Obstetrics, Osteopathy in Diseases of Women, Mechanical Causes of Woman's Ills, and What Osteopathy Does for Women. The front cover depicts and image of a man and a woman walking up the front stoop of a building. 24pp (including covers). Staple binding. OCLC-1 (Mar 2019). Measures 7 1/2" x 4 1/2"..
 Penityrol Synergie Antibiotique, Patent Medicine Advertising Postcard. .Paris, France.19694 Dr. W. Handy A Valuable Simple Recipe, for the Relief of Salt Rheum, and other Skin Diseases. .Providence, RI.[1870]
An advertising postcard for a patent medicine called Penityrol.  It was a synthetic antibiotics created to help combat diseases that are transmitted through the air or to help minimize the possibility of an infection after a surgery. What makes this advertisement extremely charming are the anthropomorphic lab rats featured on the  front of the postcard. There are two rats just outside a doctor's office (the Doctor's name is Ratibus). The first rat is standing on his hind legs and is holding a checkered handkerchief, either blowing his nose or holding in a sneeze. The second rat is again standing on his hind legs, but hunched over in pain. He has a red handkerchief tied around his head, and his hand is clenching his jaw on one side. Presumably this rat is suffering from a tooth ache. The back of the postcard has information about the product in French. There is also an address for a Dr. Kohn, whose office is located in Paris. The postage stamp provides the date, December 26, 1953.  Measures 6" x 4 1/2".. A recipe homeopathic medicine that would supposed provide relief for 'salt rheum and other skin diseases". Salt Rheum was the popular term for any cutaneous (skin) eruptions, like eczema. The recipe involved the use of molasses, water, and various roots such as yellow dock, Spanish sarsaparilla and Prince Pine, that would simmer over heat for two days until a syrup would form. then iodide of potassium was added. This medicine was to be taken oral every day, with the exception of the Sabbath, when one should take a cool bath instead. This recipe and others could be obtained at Dr. W. Handy's in Providence, RI. The recipe itself is printed on a small flyer and is surrounded by a decorative print border. Single-sided. Measures 6 3/4" x 3".
 New Peace of Mind - The First Innocent Solution of the Problem Womankind Has Tried So Many Ways to Solve - Boro-Pheno-Form. Dr. Pierre Chemical Co..Chicago, IL.1933 Dr. V. M. Pierce Your Fortune in A Tea Cup. World's Dispensary Medical Association.Buffalo, NY.1916
An 8 page fold-out brochure promoting  Boro-Pheno-Form, an antiseptic Feminine Hygienic preparation.  The cover depicts a woman in lingerie seated atop a talk bubble promoting New Freedom, New Security, Perfect Safety and New Peace of Mind.   The introduction discusses the years of research devoted to the  "intimate and delicate problem" being worth while and pricing information.  This is followed by six pages of testimonials from satisfied users.  All discuss how the product has been successful in resolving that unspoken "intimate and delicate problem".   Measure 6" x 3 1/4". . 32 pp. Pictorial wraps. A booklet of mostly advertisements for Dr. Pierce's patent medicine that was meant to treat a variety of ailments of women. The first few pages of the booklet provides two methods instructing the reader on how to read one's fortune in tea leaves. For example, two dots side by side mean an engagement, while a cross in the tea is a sign of sad tidings. The second method requires a different positioning of the cup with a different value set of results. The rest of the booklet are advertisements for Dr. Pierce, or poems or advice directed at a female reader. Some of the titles of the pieces are "What She Saw in the Looking-Glass. A Change for Good.", "How You Can Be Your Own Beauty Doctor", "The Blood is The Life", "Cheerful Women!", and "Doctor Pierce's Compound Extract of Smart Weed (or Water Pepper)". The booklet often switches between discussing actual illness, such as ovarian tumors, kidney problems, and hemorrhoids, to more cosmetic issues like pimples and acne. In the article "Cheerful Women", it states "Despondency is a thing of evil results. Worry produces nothing but wrinkles and wretchedness ... Don't worry. Worry is the greatest foe to the happiness of any household. An anxious, despondent face, a fretful, complaining voice will make every one uncomfortable. A woman's nerves are more truly the cause of worry than outside troubles."  The cover depicts three witches on broom sticks flying in the air over a scalding hot cup of tea, with the tea from the cup swirling around the witches. . Measures 5 1/2" x 4"..
Eraus Brodie Circular for The  Miraculous Cure for Corns. Rhoads & Harris, Wholesale Druggists.Philadelphia.[1900] Charles B. Dickinson Business Card - Keep Smiling Card promotes Chiropractor. .Columbus Ohio.1916
In small printed across the top of the page "magna est veritas et praevalebit" followed by The  Miraculous Cure for Corns.  A narrative from the inventor follows on how the cure was invented and how a corn can negatively impact one's life.   Followed by Directions for Use and Memoranda including - This Plaster must not be carried in the pocket or kept in any warm place... Made in London, distributed in Philadelphia.  Reverse is blank. Measures 9 3/4" x 7 1/4". . A 2 3/8" x 3 1/2" lightly coated business card  that reads "KEEP SMILING" in bold type face.  Surprisingly it is not for a dentist but a for a Doctor of Chiropractic  A chart on the reverse displays how subluxated spine effects each vertebra and the different organ or part of your body impacted. "Chiropractic Adjustments Will Remove the Cause of Disease". .
Prospectus and Promotional materials for selling Egyptian Regulator Tea. ..c1900 Torbett Sanatorium The Torbett Sanatorium Physician's Referral Card. .Marlin, TX .[1920]
24 pp prospectus and promotional brochure encouraging individuals to become sales agent for the Egyptian Drug Company selling Egyptian Regulator Tea. A buy low, sell high scheme including illustrations and text promoting the teas effect on indigestion, pimple, boils, old sores, ulcers, dyspepsia, corpulency, sick headache, rheumatism, nervous debility, neuralgia and premature old age.  Additionally includes numerous testimonials. The back cover depicts a scene on the plantations of the Egyptian Drug company, at Karnak, Upper Egypt.  Additionally, includes an order form and a single fold pamphlet titled "The Secret of Beauty"  with before and after illustrations to be disseminated with the product.  With original envelope.  Brochures measure8 1/2" x 6". . A physician's referral card for the Torbett Sanatorium, located in Marlin, TX. Founded in 1908 by John Walter Torbett, Sr (1871-1949) and specialized in the diagnosis and treatment of chronic diseases. The institute had 100 baths, and was capable of running 400 baths daily. It also had various laboratories, x-ray capabilities, and employed physiotherapy methods. The institute is still in existence today, but it is now know as the Falls Community Hospital and Clinic. The referral card is double sided,  with a picture of the sanatorium on the front with a list of resident physicians. Uniquely for the times, there is a female physician on staff, a Dr. Mary L. Webber nee Wilson (1869-1948), who was head of "General Chronic Diseases and Gynecology". The back side of the card emphasizes that "a full staff of experience physicians always present". Below are a few blank lines for the name of the incoming patient and the doctor who send them. Below that is a humorous line warning individuals of scams. "BEWARE of 'Boosters' and Commission Men who will mislead you on trains and at hotels when you arrive. They don't work for free; the victim pays the bill." Measures 4" x 2 1/2".
Dr. Howard G. Thornton A Letter from the Physician, Howard Thornton to his brother, regarding the uptake in his business and the high water levels of the Mississippi River. .Poplar, Mississippi.April 7, 1890 Richard Goodman The Law & Monopoly, The Case of the Tetracyclene. New England Free Press.Boston, MA.1963
A two page letter from Howard G. Thornton, a physician and surgeon located in Poplar, MS. He is writing his younger brother, Ed, who lives in Commerce, TX, with their parents. Thornton describes a busy winter in Mississippi, with lots of sickness, and a rainy spring, which as caused the Mississippi River to have rather high water levels. Thornton also spends a great deal of the letter encouraging his brother to study hard, in particular, to start studying medicine, and that he will do everything to help him. To that end, he has supplied his brother with a subscription to the journals, 'Home and Farm' and 'Colinder Journal'. Below are some excerpts from the letter. "I have been very busy with practice &c. We have had a great deal of sickness this winter. My practice is increasing so much I have had to buy another horse. I have physicians on all sides of me but I am getting my fair shair [sic] of practice." "I wish you would try and prepare yourself and read medicine. I will give you all the assistance I can if you will study your books at home and read good books and papers, do not let your mind run off on trashy books &c." "We have had so much rain in this country the people are very badly behind with crops. The Miss. River will soon be in about eight miles of me. I am about forty miles of the river. It is thought that tit will be the highest that has ever been. It is up to [sic] high, water marks on the Government gage now and the signal service reports another rise coming. The levies are already badly broken, and that will tear them all to pieces." The letter and corresponding envelope are written on Howard G. Thornton's business stationary. Measures 9 1/2" x 5 3/4" (letter), 6"x 3 1/2" (envelope). This booklet is a reprint of an article that uses the case of the patenting of the antibiotic drug tetracycline by US drug companies as a means of exemplifying the monopolies of the drug companies, the failures of the US government's patent system and the ineffectual Anti-Trust Laws meant to protect citizens from such things. It also brings into play international patent law and how US drug companies were allowed not only to have a monopoly on tetracycline, but also then use this drug's patent approval as a blueprint for how to push through other drugs into order to make millions. Perhaps most disturbing about the article is that years long investigation by private parties and the government proved that not only did Pfizer, the drug company that received the patent, lie to the American government, they also conspired with other drug companies in noncompete clauses to divid up the market for such drugs. After the article was published, the government brought two separate suits against Pfizer and other drug companies, first for an unlawful monopoly and, secondly, trying to cancel the patent itself alleging fraud and concealment of information. The government lost both cases, in 1979 and 1982 respectfully. The article first appeared in the journal 'New University Thought', Vol. 3, No. 4, in 1963. It unclear exactly when this reprinting was done, but it was most likely shortly thereafter. The pages are numbered 45-49, which is most likely the pages on which the article appears in the journal. 8 pgs. Green paper with staple binding. Measures 8 1/4" x 5 1/2.
Dr. Ackers Testimonial Booklet - The Story of a Year and how lives were changed by Dr. Ackers English Remedies. W. H. Hooker & Co... Joseph E. Meyer Indiana Botanical Gardens Product Catalogue. Indiana Botanical Gardens.Hammond ID.[1925]
16 pp. booklet with illustrated wraps- image from photograph of Mrs. Morton D. Harlan, before and after taking Dr. Acker's Remedies. Parenthetically her after photo looks suspiciously like it could be a photo of her daughter.  The inside cover depicts an image from  a photograph of Dr. Acker followed by his story of how he started his journey in 1855 in a tenement in London.  It proceeds to tell his story.  This is followed by the story of Mrs. Harlan and is titled "From Despair to Gladness" with the expected results from the remedies.  The remainder of the book tells of others with such titles as "His Terrible Experience" , "Why Do People Suffer?" etc. The lower portion of each page is a running series of unrelated "facts not generally know" giving the booklet some value beyond the testimonials.  Products include Dr. Acker's Remedy, Blood Elixir, Dyspepsia Tablets, Baby Soother and PIlls.  available through W. H. Hooker & Co. NYC.  The last page is an illustration of the exterior of the Hooker & Co. building.  The inside back cove r is images of the products. Measures 5" x 5". . 128 pp catalogue of herbal based products, creams, compounds, oils, liquids, plain bark, leaves, flowers and seeds. Narrative descriptions including uses ingredients and directions along with pricing information. A plethora of uses from disease, to shampoo and health maintenance. In-text illustrations throughout .  Measures 6 1/2" x 2 3/4".. The history of the Indiana Botanic Gardens, Inc., begins in 1910 with the founding of the company by Joseph E. Meyer. Joseph desired to have a business of his own, preferably something in the printing industry. Giving consideration to his set of skills, Joseph realized that he knew a great deal about printing and even more about nature. A company that sold herbs through a catalog would be a profitable endeavor for Joseph Meyer thanks to his possession of an old printing press and vast knowledge of natural remedies. It was with the blending of these two passions that gave birth to Indiana Botanic Gardens, Inc. The early bindery at Indiana Botanic Gardens, initially called the Indiana Herb Gardens, began in a small cottage in the rear of Joseph Meyer’s Hammond, Indiana home where he started growing and harvesting plants in a vacant lot. In the beginning, the business barely made living expenses for the family. Meyer’s children assisted him with activities like gathering herbs from nearby fields, packaging boxes, feeding the printing press, and binding catalogs with needle and thread.In 1918, the 400-page book, The Herbalist was printed and business expanded. Since the company was now able to sustain itself, it moved from Meyer’s cottage to a more formal and larger building off of Calumet Avenue in Hammond (pictured on the right). The same year that The Herbalist went into publication, Joseph purchased a wild tract of land on the Little Calumet River. The land held a profusion of medicinal plants and virgin forest. In 1926, a beautiful English gabled building was built. This became the home of the newly named Indiana Botanic Gardens, Inc.
 Promotional Card - The Eureka Nebulizer  - Special Treatment of the Ears, Nose, Throat and Lungs. O. Q. Holman.Le Grange, IL.c1900 Victor H Lindlahr [Editor] Set of Three Issues of Journal of Living, No. 21,25,38. Journal of Living Publishing Corp.New York, NY.1943
A 5 1/4" x 3' heavy stock card depicting a five chamber device on the front and boasting "Far better than the Pulitzer Air Bag and Catheter in the Treatment of the Ear"... The narrative on revere advises it is for the treatment of Chronic Bonchitis (sic) incipient Consumption and all Catarrhal Affectations of the Head Throat, Lungs and Deafness.  It claims forced inhalations arrest an array of respiratory conditions, healing of ulcerations, restoration of the physiological functions of Osmose and more. . These three issues, all under 25 pages, help the reader stay healthy through eating properly, and often provide meal guides or lists of food items that provide specific nutrients, like rice contain vitamin B1 or Brussels sprouts containing vitamin C. The issues in this set are: No. 21 For Women after 40, No. 25 Eat to Stay Young, and No. 38 How to Use Vegetables as Medicines. All of them are edited by Victor Lindlahr (1897-1969) was an American radio presenter and health food writer. He is perhaps most famous for authoring a book in 1940 called "You are What You Eat". Measures 7 1/4" x 5 1/4"..
Birmingham Musical Festival Committee Birmingham Musical Festival Broadside, A Charity Fundraiser. B. Hunt and Sons.Birmingham, England.September 1849 B.F. McDonald Co. Double Sided Insta-Aid - First Aid at a Glance Volvelle or Wheel. Davis Emergency Equipment Co., Inc.Newark.1932
A broadside for the  Birmingham Musical Festival, more often called the Birmingham Triennial Music Festival, which was the longest-running classical music festival. It was founded in 1787, it is several day musical festival, that ran in September every three years. The money raised by the festival originally went towards the construction of a General Hospital and after its completion, towards it's upkeep. The festival last took place in 1912. This broadside advertises the dates of the 1849 festival, September 4-7, the ticket prices, opening of doors, general directions, dress ball information, entrances, and carriage information. J. F. Ledsam, chairman. Measures 14" x 9". A 4" volvelle printed on both sides with assistance for twenty (20) emergency situations from  Asphyxiation and Alcohol Posiging to Arteries Bleeding, Fractures, Heat Exhaustion and Wounds. Each side include two die-cuts  one for the injury and the other for Symptoms and Treatment.  One side has an illustrations  depicting a skeleton with the vascular system, denoting Arteries and Points of Pressure for Controlling Hemorrhages.  This side also includes  basic eight (8) points of first aid for most vascular related first aid.  The reverse illustrates Artificial Respirations along with the information on the wheels. In original sleeve. .
R. J. Levis, M. D. Handbill Advertisement for Levis Metallic Splints. .Philadelphia, PA.[1890]  The Tripod of Analeptic Therapy . Henry Pharmacal Co..Louisville, KY.[1905]
A two-sided handbill promoting the 'Levis' Metallic Splint' which were made from copper and as such much lighter and comfortable than the other options of the day, which were mostly made out of wood. The circular was advertising a set of 21 pieces for $15 and features splints to be used for various finger, arm, or leg injurious. The splints in the set came in both child and adult sized. There are seven illustrated examples of the splints in use. The creator of this splints was Richard J. Levis, a Civil War doctor who was a surgeon at the Pennsylvania Hospital. While the there is no date on the circular, Leach & Greene appear to have been in business at the Tremont Street location in the late 1880 to the early 1890s. Some of the same illustrations found on the circular were also used in a variety of medical supply catalogues around the same time. Single sheet, double-sided, green paper. Measures 9 3/4" x 5 3/4". A booklet describing the benefits of Analeptic Therapy, and the specific drugs used in the process: Henry's Three Chlorides and Henry's Tri-Iodides. Henry's Three Chlorides was made from iron, mercury, and arsenic, and was supposed used to treat chorea, chlorosis or anemia. The three elements of the drug supposedly worked in conjunction with one another as, "it is a well-known fact that the simultaneous exhibition of small does of arsenic and bichloride of mercury, besides augmenting markedly the action of iron, prevent entirely the disturbances of digestion the constipation, headache and tendency to vascular congestion and hemorrhage which oftentimes follows the use of any iron preparation for a considerable length of time. The small dose of arsenic seems to diminish excessive sensibility of the stomach." The second drug, Henry's Tri-Iodides, was made from colchicine (anti-inflammatory), decandrin (plant), solanin (steroid glycoside, poisonous), sodium salicylate (sodium salt of salicylic acid), and iodic acid (iodine), and was supposed to treat gout, rheumatism, sciatica, neurasthenia, defective elimination and other diathetio diseases. The last page of the booklet is an add for Henry's Ichtyhol soap, a medical soap for skin issues.  20 pgs. (including printed wrappers) OCLC 0 (Jan 2019) Measures 7" x 5"..
Dr. S. H. Monell Announcement for The Coil and Static Club of the United States. .New York, NY.[1900]  Guide to Health - Munyon's Homoeopathic Home Remedies "There is no punishment too severe for those who deceive the sick...". Munyon's Homoeopathic Home Remedy Co..New York.1900
A single-fold brochure announcement of a medical society Monell was forming, called the Coil and Static Club, whose purpose was to "carry out a practical plan for keeping an up-to-date revision of clinical methods and new work constantly at the command of all physicians who use Therapeutic Apparatus." At the charge of a $1 initiation fee and annual dues of $5, the society would provide the members five benefits. First, a "year book", which was a bound copy of all relevant literature and articles published on electro-therapeutics that year. Second, a quarterly bulletin to review the new work of the society's members. Third, an annual convention which the doctors could gather and discuss new developments in the field. Fourth, free access to a laboratory for clinical research (mostly likely to be located in New York). Fifth, and last, access to a "first class laboratory expert [who] will be employed by the Society, competent to conduct physiological and pathological investigations". It is unclear if this society every really got off the ground as there appears to be no record of it, and the announcement also does state that "it is the common interest of all to enlist a large membership, as no other course will permit the benefits to be gathered and placed before each of us as needed." . Measures 6" x 3 1/2" (folded), 7" x 6" (unfolded).. Dr. Samuel Howard Monell was a doctor who promoted and practiced electro-therapeutics, which uses electricity as a means of alleviation and curing of diseases. Monell specifically used static electricity in his treatments, and he claimed that it could cure acne, lesions, insomnia, abnormal blood pressure, depression and hysteria. Electro-therapeutics is actually still a therapy used today, though mainly in the field of physical rehabilitation. 32 pp. Illustrated wraps with image of Munyon attesting to his products on the front cover and Munyon with a witch promoting Witch Hazel Soap on the back.  The inside cover is a price list of Cures and Specials.  The booklet begins with General Directions, information on Munyon's Special cures and proceeds through types of diseases including a summary of the effectiveness of the drug, the symptoms and the treatment. Covers most things from rheumatism, to diarrhea and female troubles.  Measures 6" x 4". .
The Blood Washing Method:a restorative and creative revelation for ideal perfection. Dr. Benedict Lust Publishing Co..New YOrk.1923 A. C. McCardell A Pair of Chromolithograph Advertisements for Soda Fountain "Health Promoter Syrup"  - Menu-style. Examiner.Frederick, MD.[1900]
Popular. Edition.  Lesson 1. 26 pp. Stiff wrap with image from photograph of Lust.  The treatment includes a show with a special shower head at 8 to 14 feet with special attention to the stomach and intestine, followed by a bath, an "internal bath", the consumption of "Inner-Clean" taken daily, following Ehret's Mucusless Diet and much more.  This is follwed by pages of diagrams illustrating the tehnic(sp) of the Blood-Washing Method. This is only part one.  Part II begins on page 13. The inside covers promote "Yungborn", in Butler NJ - The Original Nature Cure Resort and Recreation Home, Dr. Lust's Health Resort, Tangerine FLA and a promotion for Lust "A Dignified Profession -- Doctor of Naturopathy.  The last pages of the book promote such things as Cure by Water - The Kneipp Method,  The Nature Method of Healing by F. E. Bliz, and much more.  Measures 9 1/2" x 6 1/2".  Fading on cover.. Dr. Benedict Lust. President of the American Naturopathic Association, Dean American School of Naturopathy and Editor of "Naturopath" Magazine. Each advertisement printed on heavy card stock has a chromolithograph illustration on the front and the menu of syrup flavors on the reverse.  Both illustrate a woman wearing a Greek style dresses, and one is holding a branch of grapes while the other is holding flowers in one hand with a bunch of wheat and a scythe in the other. The advertisement on the back sides are the same for both- a list of the variety of health and soda drinks provided by A. C. McCardell. Some examples are: Pear Phosphates for impaired vitality, chocolate for nourishing and refreshment, Moxie for weakened energy, and Sarsaparilla for the blood. Also sold by A. C. McCardell were a whole line of Fruit Syrups and Ice Cream Soda, as well as Mineral Waters from Vichy (for Gentlemen), Deep Rock (for kidney trouble), and Bedford (for "sick headache"). Each item Measures 7" x 5".. A. C. McCardell was a whole sale confectionary company located in Frederick, MD owned by Adrian C. McCardell (1845-1932). He sold a variety of sugary products, though these two items focus on the items he sold that were for "health".
 Forty-fourth Annual Announcement and Catalogue of the Missouri Medical College - The Oldest College West of the Mississippi. Commercial Printing Co..St. Louis, MO.1884-85 Dr. V. M. Pierce Dream Book, Bridal Superstitions. World's Dispensary Medical Association.Buffalo, NY.[1920]
20 pp. Illustrated wraps.  Image of exterior of St. John's Hospital,  Clinical Amphitheater and Main College Building.  It begins with Announcements including Hospitals connected with the Missouri Medical College, Hospital Appointments, Clinics and summaries of each of the hospital specialties.  Also includes information on Chemical Laboratories, Spring Course and the locations of the College and St. John's Hospital.  It concludes with Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine, List of Text-Books, and Fees.  Finally,  it includes a list of Alumni of the Missouri Medical College from 1841-1884. Two full page illustrations of a clinical amphitheater and the practical chemical laboratory.   Measures 10 1/2" x 8".. A short booklet by Dr. V. M. Pierce, that in addition to advertisements for his various patent medicines, also has information on dream interoperation and bridal superstitions. Occurring to the booklet, in dreams different objects meant different things, and even the same object in different contexts could mean various things. For example, "A Bear - To dream that you have seen a bear means you have a rich, cruel, and audacious enemy. If it is running, happiness for you.", "Blood - If you see blood, it's a good sign. You will fall heir to riches. To lose blood signifies sorrow and disappointment.", and "Hills - To dream of climbing and traveling over hills signifies good." The bridal superstitions listed are both to tell if someone will be married soon, and how to ensure a blessed marriage. For example, a white pigeon near a house means that someone within will be married within a year, also, when leaving the church after the wedding ceremony, one must be sure to step out with the right foot first, or risk bad luck. The majority of the book is actually taken up by testimonials of different woman who were cured using Dr. Pierce's products. Some of the titles of these testimonials are: "Nerves in Bad Condition, Could Not Sleep, Back Ached - Took Favorite Prescription" "Was Confined to Bed Four Weeks - Now Does Housework Easily", and "Stomach Too Weak to Digest Food, Medical Discovery Gave Relief". At the back of the booklet are two tear out pages, one is a blank form for the reader to fill out so that they might get a free medical consultations, and the other is to order the book "The People's Common Sense Medical Advise, Complete Edition." The front cover features an image of two women consulting an old man with a book on symbolism in dreams. 32 pgs. Staple binding. OCLC 8 (Jan 2020) Measures 5 1/2" x 4".
Arthur H. Chandler Requirements for Co-Operation Between Hospitals and Funeral Directors. ..[1926] A.D. Haines Two (2) Leaflet Promotional Eye Charts Presented by Rochester NY Optician. .Rochester, NY.[1930]
This booklet contains a speech that was first delivered by Arthur H. Chandler at the New England Hospital Association Conference in May 1925. This speech gave a fictional telling of the death of Mr. Bank's niece and the subsequent miscommunications between the hospital and funeral home in regards to the care of her body, and ultimate dissatisfaction due to this that Mr. Banks had in regards to the resulting look of his niece. This story was used as a means of exemplifying the issues funeral directors were having in preparing bodies for viewing after an autopsy had been performed. After his speech, is a recording of the discussion which followed by a panel of members of the association. After there is a report of the committee regarding the issue, possible solutions, as well as examples of possible autopsy consent forms and a proposal for a standardization of autopsy methods. In addition to the text there  is a simple illustration of the human body detailing the proposed incision locations. This speech, discussion and report was later published in the Boston Medical and Surgical Journal Vol. 194, No. 16, in April of 1926. This item is a reprinting of that article. There is no information regarding the publication date or time of this particular edition. 22 pps. Green wrappers. Staple binding. Measures 9" x 6". Two (2) different 8 3/4" x 4 1/4" promotional flyers presented by Dr. A. D. Haines, Eye and Ear Specialist.  Each titled Test Your Eyes! with a different graphic at top to quickly determine the need to seek the care of an eye specialist. One also has a sentence of fine print to determine the need for reading glasses.   This is followed by different witty promotional verses encouraging individuals to have a  their eyes tested free by Dr. Haines. The reverse again with different messaging - one further describes his practice and assurances and the other discusses astigmatism..
Presbyterian Hospital Annual Report and Fundraising appeal. Presbyterian Hospital.New York. NY.1908 Manuscript Cures for Hydrophobia & Cancer. ..
16 (unnumbered) pp. Printed on lightly polished paper.  Images from photographs throughout of staff assisting patients, mostly the indigent. The narration begins with acknowledgment of the trend in hospital work toward scientific exactness, and the keeping of fuller  records of all symptoms and treatment of the patient followed by two pages of examples.  This is intended to explain the rising costs of medical care. This is followed by information on the Dispensary, Tuberculosis Work, Ambulance Service and Emergency Ward, Visiting Nursing Services, Katie Geitz Kitchen for instructing and feeding the indigent.  The booklet concludes with information on the School of Nursing and a chart outlining hospital utilization comparing 1908 to 1907. Measures 7 3/4" x 5 1/4".. A 10" x 6" page that appears to have been removed from a ledger or journal with two entries that appear to be in different hands. The first is a cure for hydrophobia that entails mixing elecampane root, a puff of madder and a quart of new milk brought to boil in a water bath.  This mixture is taken multiple times for several days. The second is a cure for cancer using white ash branches that have been burned to ash, making a strong lye boil as strong as possible, with lard and flour to make a plaster.Applied to Cancer for 48 hours "the torture endured by the patient is something horrible".  This is followed by a half-strength plaster for three weeks, at the end of which "the cancer can be drawn out with ease and the patient is cured" Reverse is blank.  No indication as to author, date, local etc.  c1880s..
 Mother Gray's Sweet Powders for Children, Advertising Booklet and Paper Doll. J. B. Carroll Co .Chicago.c1900 C. Lewis Diehl Formulas for Some Elixirs and Medicated Wines, Adopted by the Louisville College of Pharmacy. J. J. Spalding & Co. .Chicago..1872
Two pieces of advertising materials for Mother Gray's Sweet Powders for Children. The first item is a 16 pp (including covers) booklet advertising Mother Gray's Sweet Powders for Children, as well as other products sold by the manufacturer, including Mother Gray's Aromatic Leaf (a medicinal tea for digestive health) and Allen's Foot Ease (a powder to help with achy feet). The Sweet Powders was supposedly an all-natural remedy developed by a nurse, known as Mother Gray, who worked at the Children’s Home in New York City. While the powders were originally meant to treat pinworms, they were also soon used to treat a variety of other ailments, such as headaches, fever, and constipation. While it is unknown if there is any truth to who Mother Gray was, the product itself was distributed and marketed by Allen S. Olmstead who owned a proprietary medicine company. The powders weren’t exactly made from ‘all-natural’ ingredients, the main ingredient was actually calomel (mercurous chloride), which could be toxic if used regularly, causing mercury poisoning. Other ingredients were licorice, slippery elm, anise, sulfur, bicarbonate of soda, sugar (hence the word sweet in the name) and mandrake (also poisonous). The second item is a paper doll of Mother Gray, who supposedly was a nurse, specializing in children's health. The "walking" paper doll has feet on the bottom that rotate as you push it across a table. The pocket of the dress has an insert so that you can have something sticking out of the pocket. The back states that the doll was made by J. B. Carroll Co. Measures 5 3/4" x3" (booklet), 6" x 2 1/2" (paper doll) . Minor toning due to age. 9 pp. wraps. The content is a paper read by the author, C. Lewis Diehl discussing formulas for making Elixir of Calisaya ark, Simple Elixir, Wine of Orange, Solutions of Essential Oils, Cochineal Color, Compound Elixir of Taraxacum, Elixir of Pyrophosphate of Iron, Quinia and Strychnia with detailed formulas and instructions on formulating.  The last three pages provides a list of formulas for approximately 25 additional elixirs.  Measures 9" x 6"..
D. A. Cleaveland, M. D. Atlantic Side Sanitarium, 'Glencroe'. .West Tisbury, Martha's Vineyard, MA.[1900]  Tennessee Journal of Medical and Surgical Diseases of Women and Children and Abstracts of Medical Sciences.  Volume I No. 1. H. J. Wells, MD.Nashville, TN.April, 1884
Single fold pamphlet advertising a newly built sanitarium called Glencroe, in the small town of West Tisbury located on Martha's Vineyard in Massachusetts. The proprietor, Dr. D. A. Cleaveland, of the sanitarium starts by praising the weather, which apparently in winter is only "five degrees colder than Old Point Comfort, VA", and then continues on to state the numerous diseases which are not a problem for the islands residents. "Diphtheria is unknown in this part of the island. Malignant Scarlatina, typhoid fever, cholera infantum, or any inflammatory intestinal disease, together with phthisis, are rarely met with..." Cleaveland spends some time describing the "modern conveniences" of Glencroe, before addressing the types of patients he wishes to receive, "with the present accommodations he can only care for a certain class of cases, viz., some forms of neurasthenia, insomnia, diseases characterized by deficient nerve force, malaria, surgical convalescents, and those convalescing from acute non-contagious disease; but for the present he is unable to accommodate cases of insanity, epilepsy, or any other malady that would shock the sensibilities of the most delicate and refined invalid." Single fold. Measures 7" x 4 1/4" (folded), 8 1/2" x 7" (unfolded). . 14pp.  Sent as a sample copy. Begins with an editorial on the intent of the publication and tidbits on colleagues, insurance, improving the publication, etc. This is followed by excerpts from "Selected Articles"  including An Undescribed Disease of the Fallopian Tubes, Offensive Catamenial Discharges, Effects of Lime-Juice on the Menses, Water for Infants, Diarrhea - Caster Oil, Removal of Wens without the Knife and many more. Most are one to for paragraphs in length. This is followed by acknowledgments of Medical Professionals and friends.  Finally, it concludes with an 8 pp article by the publisher defending himself from an attempted professional and moral assassination by Prof. Deering J. Roberts, Editor of the Southern Practitioner.  Measures 8 3/4" x 5 3/4".. The 8 page rebuttal may have been the true intent of the publication.  This was the only issue published.
 Warner's Safe Dictionary - Comprising over 5000 Words with Definitions and Pronunciations plus testimonials for Warner's Safe Cure.. H. H. Warner & Co..Rochester, NY.1889 T.K. Taylor. The Pocket Physician or Domestic Medical Adviser; Designed for both Married & Single; . . Boston. 1852
32 pp. combination dictionary and promotional brochure for Warner's Safe Cure remedies.  The book is structured with Warner's Safe Dictionary in three columns on the verso and testimonials and promotion.  The booklet begins with a table of contents for the promotion organized primarily by disease system.  The front and back covers depict full page illustrations of their products including Kidney and Liver Cure, Log Cabin Sarsaparilla and the Warner's Safe Remedies with the image of the safe and Warner's Log Cabin Remedies on the back cover.  Measures 11" x 6'. . 128 pp. Blue blind stamp gilt cover, 27 page introduction, index in back of book. Common symptoms, and treatments. Contains a catalog of medicines. The book covers very personal ailments and situations such as abortion, masturbation, conception, and menstruation as well as more acceptable discussions as asthma, heartburn, and palpitations. 4 1/2" x 3" some staining on cover, some foxing, spine loosening in areas, hand corrected address on title page and page 98's advertisement for the reader
Norman Carr, M. D. Birth Control, Plain Medical Information. Lanteen Laboratories, INC.,  under the auspices Medical Bureaus of Information on Birth Control.Chicago, IL.1934  The Famous Original Black Water Baths. The Famous Original Black Water Baths.Alden, NY.1915
A short 22pp booklet about the different methods of birth control available to women in the 1930s. This booklet attempts to straddle a very fine line between the moral and religious ideals, and women's reproductive rights, however it often manages to contradict itself in doing so. It starts off by saying that "Motherhood is the grandest, richest and the most glorious experience which may occur in a woman's life.... it is too wonderful to treat it lightly and too sacred to thrust it upon a woman against her will...", which appears to be a very pro-life woman's right stance in regard to all women, regardless of circumstance. However it soon becomes very clear that this stance is only considered moral and ethical by them under very strict conditions: "those few who still say they are opposed to Birth Control are often very ignorant of the problem about which they attempt to argue.... they often do not distinguish between Birth Control and abortion.... Birth Control, as advocated by ethical persons and organizations, is not meant for the illicit use of the unmarried, but is designed for the protection of the health and happiness of married couple... Birth Control in marriage is not a religious question, it is a matter of economics and health." After this outlining of when birth control should be used, the booklet proceeds to describe the various methods of birth control, and the pros and cons of each. Methods that are not recommended are: inter-uterine stems often called gold buttons or wishbones (a pre cursory to today's modern hormonal IUDs), douching, withdrawal, suppositories, and male condoms (because "in most cases it is unsatisfactory to one or both parties, occasionally harmful; and due to defective material, especially the cheaper kind, it often fails as a contra-ceptive", a position that is currently recognized as untrue). Next the booklet continues on to recommended two different types of birth control methods, though first they do stress that any and all of these methods must be done before intercourse starts. The first approved method recommended is contra-ceptive jelly, which in order to use, one must determine what class of woman you are.  "First class" women are "brides and wives who have not yet borne a child or suffered a miscarriage", and therefore can just smear the jelly over one's cervix. Second class women, women who have only had one child and suffered no "birth damage" to the cervix, might be able to just use the contra-ceptive jelly, but probably should use it with a tampon or cap, and third class women are those who have had more than one child or birth damage and then must use the jelly with a tampon or cap. The second approved method is the diaphragm, often called the female condom, which according to the the 1930 International Conference on Birth Control, it is "the best known method of contra-ception." Next the booklet provides information on the Medical Bureaus of Information on Birth Control who had medical offices in Chicago and Detroit where women could attend free lectures on birth control and also would be able to see only female physicians. A short section on the "Legal and Ethical" practices of birth control follow, which essentially state that birth control is not illegal and that "one of the moral reasons for the practice of Birth Control is that it eliminates the dangers of illegal abortions".  Lastly there are four pages of advertisements for Lanteen Birth control products themselves, such as their various jellies, tampons and caps. The booklet contains several illustrations of the products, diagrams on how to use them, and three small illustrations of the cervix so that a woman can better understand the different classes of women.  Illustrated wrappers. Staple binding. OCLC 2  (APR 2020) Measures 6 3/4" x 3 1/4".. The town of Alden in New York became famous in 1891 due to the discovery of black mineral water, more often referred to as black water, a thick, rotten egg smelling water with supposed healing properties. This booklet is advertising for the "Famous Original Black Water Baths" and its opening of our their new modern bath house. This new bath house was "thoroughly equipped with every convenience for the treatment and comfort of our patients." In addition to the baths themselves it had: sun parlors, sanitary drinking foundations, heated swimming pool, billiard room, tennis courts, steam and electricity. The booklet describes the town of Alden, Old Faithful (the original well used to drill for the black water), a description of the facilities, a scientific analysis of the black water (which was mostly chlorine, bromide and sulfuric acid), description of the care and food received there, expenses (both of your stay and price of bottle black water for at home use), and their hours of operation. They claimed that the black water helped mostly with rheumatic cases, and was "good for the stomach", liver and kidney issues, (unnamed) skin diseases, and nervousness. Apparently it was a "common occurrence to see people arrive in Alden on crutches, in wheel chairs, and on cots, and within a few days walk from the bath house to their boarding houses." The water itself was so heavy that one would "float like a cork" while taking a bath in it and the water left the "pores of the skin filled with pure salt". Interesting, unlike other bathhouses of the era that used a more traditional mineral water, patients here were required to bring their own sheets and towels. The booklet includes twenty-two (22) black and white printed photographs of the bath house, its grounds and the town of Alden. Additionally there are two printed maps, one a map of Buffalo, Alden and surrounding towns, and the second, is a larger map of western New York detailing its paved highways. The front cover has a colorized photograph ?? of the bath house itself. The resort had originally opened in a much smaller bath house in 1904. Operation continued in their new bathhouse until 1964 when it closed and the building itself was converted into a church. Printer: Ashby Printing Company. Staple binding. 20 pages.  Measures 8"x 4".
 Lampe Fumivore Hygienique, a bout de platine incandescent pour purifier l'air des appartements [Fumivore Hygienic Lamp, Incandescent platinum end to purify the air of apartments]. Muller, L..Paris.c1889 3 Promotional Items Le Thermogene: Capsicum Cotton wadding to treat  ailments. Le Thermogene.Paris.c1900
This booklet is a deco advertisement for patent medicine, which in this case is a crystal falcon meant to purify the air. It was sold in a wide variety of colors and styles, as depicted on the back cover, along with several scents. It was advertised as being great at clearing out bad odors and tobacco. The seller of this item was L. Muller, who was a pharmacist in Paris. The covers are done in three colors, blue, red and black. The front cover depicts a single, large crystal falcon while the back cover depicts 11 different ones in all shapes and sizes, even one that looks to be about the size of a lipstick tube. Lithograph wrappers. 12 pages. OCLC -2 (Feb 2019). Measures 5 1/2" x 4".. A collection of three items (in French) advertising 'Le Thermogene' a patent medicine product that was meant to help with a variety of ailments such as coughing, bronchitis, flue, sore throat, colds, joint pains, and rheumatism. The product was a heating pad that was composed of soft cotton wadding that had been treated with capsicum and could be placed on various parts of the body. The first item in the collection is flyer (measures 8 1/4" x 5 1/4") featuring a fire-eating circus performer in a green body suit holding the product (represented as large orange objects) and breathing out fire. This artwork was designed by Leonetto Cappiello (1875-1942) who was an Italian and French poster art designer who is nowadays often referred to as the "father or modern advertising." This was due to the fact that he was the first to use bold figures that popped out of their contrasting black background. The second item in this collection is a single-fold pamphlet (Measures: 6 1/4" x4 3/4" folded, 9 1/4" x 6 1/4" unfolded). This pamphlet provides simple, and to the point information about the product as well as depicting 6 illustrations of figures show how the product can be used on a variety of places on the body. On the front is the same circus figure by Cappiello found on the flyer, however this time the only color used is in the product the figure is holding, and the fire coming out of his mouth. The last item in the collection is a small 12 page staple booklet that is chalk full of more detailed information about the product. The back of the booklet actually has the image of the circus performer, while the front of the booklet has a roaring fire in a fire pit.  .
Bethesda Sanatorium Bethesda Sanatorium, an Advertising Folding Brochure. The Smith-Brooks Press.Denver, CO.1917  You Don't Think, A War Department Pamphlet, NO. 21-15. War Department.Washington, DC.16236
An eight page folded brochure for Bethesda Sanatorium, a Christian Institution specializing on the treatment of tuberculosis. Located in Denver, CO, overlooking the Rocky Mountains, the institution sits at about five thousand feet above sea level. This high altitude, that is 'light and dry' was supposedly "not so irritating to the respiratory tract, and [it] gives a better opportunity for healing of the diseased tissues." What is interesting about this sanatorium in particular is that it stresses that "the institution is not a hospital in any sense of the word. The Sanatorium is a Health University, where patients are taken and taught methods of living by which they are able to effect an arrest of the disease." Most of the sanatoriums around this time consistently made claims that they could 'cure' all types of diseases, including tuberculosis, rather than stressing teaching their patients how to manage and live with chronic diseases. The brochure also includes nine (9) printed photographs of the facility, grounds and staff. 8 folding pages. The institution is still open today, but is now known as the Bethesda Christian Counseling Midwest, Inc. Measures 9" x 4" (folded), 16" x 9" (unfolded). "YOU DON'T THINK IT CAN EVER HAPPEN TO YOU VD ... venereal disease." And so starts a 64 (unnumbered) pp booklet made during WWII to educate soldiers on various sexually transmitted diseases, mainly syphilis and gonorrhea. The military efforts to stave of venereal diseases often sought to balance the religious and moral standards of the home front while dealing with the reality of soldiers away from home and fighting a war. The booklet is written in plain simple language, using different colors to emphasis certain words; each message with a relevant illustration.  Additionally, within the text different fonts or embellishments (capitals, italics, font color, etc.) are used to emphasize certain words. For nearly all text pages, there is an accompanying illustration on the next page used to underscore the text. It begins by stating that no matter how "smart at sizing up a gal... [you] could not tell at a glance" if a girl had VD, and "No girl is going to tell you she has it, you can't ever be sure". It continues on by educating the reader a bit on how one can get a STD, such as "almost always you get it by sexual intercourse when THIS PART of the body is exposed" (this quote is accompanied by an illustration of a fully clothed man with red lines used to indicate his genital regions). This is followed by bringing on the shame stating that it can "wreck....  a lot of plans" (accompanied by an illustration of a diamond ring) and also "your armies plans: venereal diseases can put a man OFF THE TEAM  -- and that is O.K. by the ENEMY..." (accompanied by an illustration of soldiers deploying from a LCVP/ Higgins boat during a beach landing with one soldier looking away, drawn in red). It continues by imploring the soldier to "live by the moral and religious laws that have been taught you: Don't have sexual intercourse outside of marriage [and] if you do expose yourself, TAKE ALL PRECAUTIONS ... always use a rubber ... and be sure you have a PRO-KIT with you". What follows next is very detailed instructions on where a soldier can obtain such items, and how to use them. What is an interesting contraction in this section is that they actually use the appropriate anatomical  terms rather than the undefined "THIS PART" with an oblique illustration from earlier in the pamphlet. The booklet ends, with two final statements to the soldier, "If you do get careless and become infected ... the Army has the best treatment you can get anywhere" and that "SCIENCE is on your side soldier, USE IT."  On the back cover is printed "War Department Pamphlet No. 21-25, 'You Don't Think,' is published for the information and guidance of all concerned. [A. G. 726.1 (13 Jun 44) ] Distribution: One to each male officer and enlisted man."   Staple binding. Measures 5 1/4" x 4 1/4". To view the item, please click on the following link: https://photos.app.goo.gl/v6pUg2ALXuiHuipe7. Sexual transmitted diseases were a bit problem for the military effort, something that the US learned in WWI when VD caused around 18,000 soldiers a day to be laid up. Towards the end of 1944, mainly due the military's effort to educate the troops and medical advances (with gonorrhea going from a month long hospital stay in 1943 to a 5 day treatment course that normally could be done while on duty in 1944), those numbered had dropped to about 600 per day being laid up due to sexually transmitted diseases.  The message from these campaigns included Attempts to stop the soldier from engaging in sexual activity by shaming them, either by using the religious and moral standards (sex should only happen between married couples, VD can destroy families, etc.) If a soldier caught a VD and had to be removed from duty, he was letting his fellow soldiers down, and helping the enemy. Depicting  women as deceitful or temptresses that soldiers had to been on guard against. Normalizing the use of condoms or a "pro-kit" (prophylactic). Due to the length of this booklet it manages to extoll on all of the various forms of deterrents.
 1869 Valedictory Address of Toland Medical College,by L.C. Lane Professor of Anatomy. Published at the Request of the Class; Spears & Co. SanFrancisco. 1869. . ..  Annual Announcement of Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia, 1847-48 Session. Frick, Kelly & Co. .Philadelphia.1847
An 18 pp pamphlet with paper wraps. An address to the Gentleman of the Graduating Class, November 4, 1869. In 1858 California surgeon Elias Samuel Cooper organized the Medical Department of the University of the Pacific with a board of trustees consisting of ten clergymen and three physicians. The first session opened in May 1859, with a class of ten attending lectures in materia medica, chemistry, physiology, anatomy and medical jurisprudence. Dr. Cooper's death in 1862 brought confusion to the new school, and in 1864 the Pacific Medical faculty "suspended" activities and joined Dr. Hugh Toland in his efforts to found a viable medical school in San Francisco. As San Francisco's population continued to grow, Hugh Toland's influence and wealth also increased, earning an estimated $40,000 per year. In 1864, he decided to establish a medical school in San Francisco and purchased land for that purpose in North Beach, at Stockton and Francisco, opposite the San Francisco City and County Hospital. A handsome building was soon completed, and Toland Medical College was open for enrolment. Clinical instruction and dissecting experience were the centerpieces of Toland's educational program, reflecting his training and experience in Parisian hospitals where clinical findings were carefully correlated with autopsy results." http://history.library.ucsf.edu/1868_hospitals.html 5 ¾” x 8 ¼” . 16 pp. wraps.  Begins with announcement of achievements, including the large class size and need to expand. Highlights from the institutions history.  Followed by Course of Instruction, Clinical Instructions with a report of Cases presented at the Jefferson College that year with a breakdown of symptoms and diagnosis by department and specialty within department. It concludes with information on Practical Anatomy, Museum, Regulations, Fees and Books that may be required for for different courses of lecture.  Measures 8 3/4" x 5 1/2". .
Synopsis of a Course of Lectures on Anatomy and Surgery.  Magnus Falconar  London 1777 Dr. Bulter Wilmarth  A Letter between Two Doctors about working together at a Sanitarium and the Use of Homeopathic Medicines. .Lowell, MA.September 26, 1849
238 pp. marbles cover with leather spine, text interspersed with blank pages. Synopsis describes medical procedures for surgery and the anatomy of the human body. It is separated into four lectures, Introduction to the Study of Anatomy, Osteology, Myology, and Angiology. 8 1/2" x 5" Some missing pages at front, inscribed and has hand written notes, foxing throughout, wear on cover Stampless post. A letter between two doctors, Dr. Bulter Wilmarth and Dr. John Hero that discussing the various patients at a local sanitarium in Lowell, MA, that Wilmarth is treating. There is also some talk about the possibility of the pair working together, either at the current sanitarium or purchasing a sanitarium together elsewhere. This idea for the men to buy and run a sanitarium together does not appear to be a new one, but rather one that they have been kicking around for a while. Dr. Butler Wilmarth seems to be temporarily working at the sanitarium in Lowell, it is unclear if he was asked for fill in for a doctor there and heard about the possible sale of the sanitarium or if he is there as a potential buyer and decided to take on some work there to see if he like it. One thing is clear, that while it appears as though Dr. Wilmarth has respect for the "water cures", other homeopathic remedies are not to his liking, even as he does his best to learn about them and treat patients using them. The two doctors, Wilmarth and Hero, were friends that had first established their relationship as a mentor-student bond when Hero was studying medicine under Wilmarth. The two did not purchase the sanitarium discussed in the letter, but a few years later, in 1851, they would purchase one in Westboro, MA. Below are some quotes from the letter: "But I am in quite an interesting and instructive school myself and I wish you was here to share a part in the labor and responsibleness of the institution.  Here is considerable head-work to do, I assure you - I have about all sorts of diseases and dispositions to deal with and need much wisdom as well as some patience to get along with so many crooked patients, bathmen [sic], cooks, waiters, &c. I have been able to keep things pretty straight yet. We have 28 patients now. Some are doing well, some stationary some growing worse if any thing. It is no small task to answer all their questions, explain all their difficulties, and encourage them to hope and persevere. Some of the are quite homeopathic and want to be swallowing pellets and powders. Dr. Foster has lots of homeopathic medicine, so I give a little hurf [also known as cress or lepidium sativum], and coffea [coffea cruda] and bell [belladonna?] and hyos [hyoscyamus niger] and bryonia and mercurius. But for my life, I can't tell whether it does any good or not." "I hope to return in about 2 weeks, and that cant make a thousand dollars difference with the cold hearted owner. I think - if it does - let it go to the first bidder. There are more places in N.E. (New England) than Grapton or Worchester or even Milford.... It is some expected Dr. Tortes will leave here. I have been invited by the owner to hire, or buy, this their stand in such an event. Here everything is ready, furniture and all for operations. Never fear (if the Lord will) we will do something next season some where." . Dr. Butler Wilmarth was born on December 18, 1798 in Montague, MA to Peggy Coleman. He was an illegitimate child, and while his biological father was never named, Butler believed that he was a man of some note in town. In 1802 he was bound out to town selectman Amos Wilmarth of Rowe, who would eventually adopt him, and Butler would take his name. He began studying medicine at the age of 23 under the tutelage of Dr. William F. Selden. On March 1, 1831 he married Phila Osgood (1806-1859). Together they had two children: Jerome Terome Wilmarth (1831-?) and Phila Wilmarth Weston (1841-1903). In 1841 he would become a convert to hydropathic remedies, after he himself fell it and was cured by such treatments. He worked and established a variety of different bath houses in Massachusetts and New York before establishing one with a former student of his, J. H. Hero in Westboro, MA. In 1851 he was elected President of the Hydropathic Association of Physicians and Surgeons. On May 6, 1853, while returning from the association's annual meeting, the train he was on suffered a catastrophic collision at the Norwalk Bridge in CT. Wilmarth and over forty-five others would perish in the train accident, which is considered to be the first major US railroad disaster. . John Henry Hero  was born on December 30, 1820 to John Hero (1787-1861) and Polly Claffin (1791-1832) in Milford, MA. He had several siblings: Susannah H. Hero (1811-?),  Horace B. Hero (1812-?) Eliza H Hero (1814-1867), Hannah H Hero (1817-?), Izanna Chamberlain Hero (1823-1914), and Edwin H Hero (1831-?). He married Irene Morse Parkhurst (1822-1906) on September 22, 1850. They had three children: Butler Wilmarth Hero (1859 -1932) who was named after John's friend, mentor, and business partner, George Hoyt Hero (1861-1933), and John P. Hero (1863-1865). John studied medicine with Dr. Butler Wilmarth of Hopedale and graduated from Central Medical College in Syracuse, NY. Him and Wilmarth formed a strong mentorship bond that, in 1852, resulted in him and Wilmarth going into business with one another in Westboro by opening a bath house. In 1853, after Wilmarth's death, Hero would become the sole owner. On January 6, 1898 John would die of heart disease, which was a complication of his stomach cancer.
Emerson Family A Collection of Letters to the Emerson Family. .Ireland Depot, Holyoke, MA.1847-1857 Dr. Miles Paper Doll - Katrina Knickerbocker - I talk for Dr. Miles' Heart Cure. Dr. Miles Medical Co. .Elkhart In..1902
A collection of eleven (11) letters belonging to the Emerson Family of Holyoke, MA. The majority of the letters are send to Ireland Depot, which was the name of the town's post office from the mid 1840s to mid 1850s. The letters date from 1847 to 1857, with the bulk of the correspondence between 1848 to 1850, and between Lovina H. Fay Emerson (1822-1897) and her friend Catherine A. George Bates (1826-1879). Eight of the letters are folded stampless posts, the other three have their corresponding envelopes. The six letters written by Catherine A. George Bates to Lovina, which start in 1847 congratulating Lovina on her recent marriage to William.  The letters discuss a variety of topics, but the main thread  is Catherine's conversion to Christianity, her conversion in 1848 along with Catherine's friend Susan Pond, local events, updates on sickness in the area (highlights being the death of Catherine's nephew due to dysentery, her father's bout with typhoid fever, and her own bout with the mumps), and Catherine's (rather unsuccessful) attempt to comfort Lovina on the upcoming birth of her first child by telling her of the death of Susan Pond's newborn twin boys. There are three letters from Paesiello Emerson (1832-1927), to his sister Mary Frances Emerson (1833-1853), who are William's children from his first marriage. Paesiello had moved from the family homestead to Ashland, MA for work, while Mary was still living with their father and his new wife, Lovina, in Holyoke, MA. Paesiello writes updating his sister on his life, such as sleigh rides and his new membership in the local division of the Sons of Temperance while also poetically waxing about nature and the changing of seasons. The last two letters in the collection are one-offs. The first is to William Emerson, the patriarch of the family, about a shipment of lumber being send to him and the request for payment. Depending on the census record, William is either a carpenter or farmer. The last letter is from a C. B. Angier, a distant relative of Lovina (her mother's maiden name is Angier), and provides a short update on their life. Below are excerpts from the letters: "I think I felt the importance of religion I saw myself to be a great sinner but I did not want you to know it. I remember well one Sunday evening there was quite a number went forward for prayer. I felt as if I must go, I tried to stand but Satan whispered in my ear that if I went no one would believe that I was in earnest that I could do it better where I was & I listened to him and sat still. I think now if I had broken away from him then I might have found peace. You thought I was indifferent, I was miserable for I was trying to be a Christian and have no one know it." - Catherine A. George Bates to her friend Lovina H. Fay Emerson, June 22, 1848 "It has been quite sickly about us, one little child buried today. One case in particular I must tell you, a lady 35 years old, on who belonged in this neighborhood & always lived with her parents (who are quite aged) was married & went to her home with every prospect of happiness, before she had scarcely begun to enjoy it was called to die, just 4 weeks from the day she was married, she was buried at the same place where she stood a bride, she lay a corpse." -  Catherine A. George Bates to her friend Lovina H. Fay Emerson, September 21, 1848 "I have just finished loading the lumber for you. A part of the boards are not such as I stands [sp?] have had you, but they are at the depot. I though I would send them, there are 2330 fit [sic] I also send more of the short timbers which you will please see that it is unloaded & kept safety. What you can not sell ??? please send me the money for the lumber as fast as possibly convenient and greatly oblige." - H. Williams to William Emerson, May 1, 1849 "... I came home, I found little Frank (that is Brother Hiram's youngest child) very sick with Dysentery. He had not been well for a week or two before, he had 10 teeth besides there were his stomach teeth & two others were swollen very hard which caused his sickness. The Doctor said it was a very doubtful case. Mother & others that saw him said he could not get well. I thought perhaps he might altho I knew he was very sick. Wednesday he seemed considerably better. Thursday he was very restless. Friday everything he took he vomited. The disease had gone to his head, he would throw it from one side to the other in dreadful distress through the day. Saturday his hands & feet were very cold, could not warm them, thought he could no live the night out but by rubbing he seemed to get a little rest. He was so thirsty, could raise himself & grasp the tumbler & look so wistful as if he thought we could help him, the Dr. told us he thought he would have spasms, but he did not, he grew weaker and weaker until about 6 o'clock Sunday night. Mother was over him & noticed a change & called to us, it was but to see him gasp his last breath. He had turned his eyes towards the window and thus without a groan or struggle he fell asleep in the arms of his savior, just like the going down of the sun, altho set forever to this world it shall dawn in a bright & better world, as I gaxed [sic] upon him now still in death & kissed his cold lips I said is this death? As this was the first I ever witnessed. The impression I received is pleasant, Oh! that I may so live that when I die it may be as well with me as I believe it is with him... the mother appears calm & resigned to this event as well as looking forward to a time not far distant when another treasure may be sent to her, I shall feel very anxious to hear from you after you receive this, as the critical time of which spoke is near at hand. You must keep could courage [Lovina is pregnant with her first child will be born in October 1849]. Friend Susan was very sick when her children were born, only think she had two sons, one weighted 3 1/2, the other 7 pounds. The latter was dead, the little one lived two days. She was so disappointed when it died, she got a long remarkably well herself & has been very well during the summer. I wish you could see her, it would do you good, she wished me to give you her love and good wishes... I think I have not written you since the California fever has done such destructive work, carrying off its hundreds and thousands, from their homes and the enjoyments of life where and for what do they thus sacrifice their lives? For gold that shall perish, it appears strange to me that so many are ready to leave all & go. I am thankful there has none of my relations gone as yet, but numbers of friends & acquaintances have gone. Some have arrived there & others that have not been heard from. "  - Catherine A. George Bates to her friend Lovina H. Fay Emerson, September 23, 1849 "I haven't anything to do and have not had much for two months past, I have carved my earned my board and that is about all. If I don't have something to do before long I shall be sick or crazy or something else. But there are signs of business being better before a great while. I still board at Mr. Montague and I think I shall as long as they will keep me. Last Friday I took a sleigh ride about five miles with another person who I shall not name here. It being a pleasant afternoon we had a first rate time and got home at last safe and sound." - George P. Emerson to Miss Mary Emerson, January 4, 1850 "But spring has come and with it pretty blue birds, how pretty they sing in the morning. Winter has gone and with it the cold blistering days and nights with its long evenings and cold snows. Summer will soon be here with its long hot sultry days and soon will be the days when we shall hear the distant muttering thunder and see the dark black clouds with its forked lighting... I joined the Division of Sons of Temperance four weeks ago last night and I like them very much." - George P. Emerson to Miss Mary Emerson, April 2, 1850 "Your letter came to hand soon after date, it found me watching by the sick bed of my dear Father, he was taken sick the week after I came home with Typhoid fever... he complained of his dead did not seem to know or remember anything, said it did not seem like his own head... the Dr. came but not do anything for him, we dismissed him & called another & one to consult & before night they bled & blistered him & give him medicine which roused him, he would talk one day about everything, did not know us at all, the next would sleep all day so sound that we could not wake him... my health has been good except about 3 weeks I had the mumps, they went to my head & I had sores in my ears, it was bad but I felt so anxious about Father that I did not mind it." -  - Catherine A. George Bates to her friend Lovina H. Fay Emerson, July 21, 1857 . For the entirety of her letters in these collection, Catherine (sometimes spelled Catarina in census records) signs her name C. A. George, as she does not marry a man named Lafayette Bates until 1862. William Goddard Emerson was born on January 21, 1806 to Reuben Babcock (1755-1844) and Hannah Goddard (1761-1857) in Northborough, MA. As William does not have the same last name as his parents, he might have been adopted or for some reason changed his name later in life. William had twelve siblings. He married Susan Perkins (1804-1843) on October 13, 1831, and had five children: George Paesiello Emerson (1832-1927), Mary Frances Emerson (1833-1853), Ginevra Emerson (1836-1838), Arthur Emerson (1838-1841), and Marcellus Emerson (1843-1878). After Susan died in 1843, he remarried on August 8, 1847 to Lovina H. Fay (1822-1897). With his second wife, Lovina, he had four children: William Francis Emerson (1849-1931), Annie Elizabeth Emerson (1859-1941), Mary G. Emerson (1861-1863), and Henry Howard Emerson (1865-1943). He died on April 19, 1887 of old age. A 20 3/4" tall die-cut easel back paper doll depicting Katrina Knickerbocker holding a bottle of Dr. Miles New Heart Cure. The reverse introduces Katrina, a character in Rip Van Winkle and of course promoting the various Dr. Miles with brief narratives and a complete product listing including pricing.  Also includes three costumes and hats.   The costumes are identified e.g. for a stroll on the Bowling Green.  Each costume has product information on the reverse. The paper dolls were offered as premiums for a product label and five 2 cent stamps.  .
Dr. Miles Paper Doll -Dorothy (Dolly) Quincy - Holding a Bottle of Dr. Miles Restorative Nervine. Dr. Miles Medical Co. .Elkhart In..1902 Uncut Engraving  Patriotic Perpetual Calendar, American Flag, George Washington.c1820-30
A 20 3/4" tall die-cut easel back paper doll depicting Dorothy (Dolly) Quincy  holding a bottle of Dr. Miles Restorative Nervine. The reverse introduces Dolly, the future wife of John Hancock and of course promoting the various Dr. Miles with brief narratives and a complete product listing including pricing.  Also includes three costumes and hats.   The costumes are identified e.g. the gown she wore when first she met John Hancock.  Each costume has product information on the reverse.  Includes original mailer from Dr. Miles Medical Co. The paper dolls were offered as premiums for a product label and five 2 cent stamps.  . An 8    x 11  sheet with engraved patriotic imagery designed to be cut and assembled to create a perpetual calendar. Two (2) tabs to be cut and inserted to provide the days of the week and the months and the days in a month. Excellent. Corner clip on sheet margin.. .
Collection of 110 Get Well Greeting Cards- How we Encouraged those who Ailed 1920s-1950s  Vin Mariani, Cocaine & Wine, Patent Medicine - A collection of 150 post cards "L'Album Mariani" designed by famous artists. ..1900-1910
A collection of 110 different get well cards, predominantly for children and dating from the 1930s to the 1950s with others 1910 to 2000. A majority of the cards in this collection are light-hearted in nature and intended to “cheer-up” the recipient.  Selected from a 30 plus year extensive collection of greeting cards, the get-well cards are among the most creative and entertaining.  Common threads are humor and depicting people or anthropomorphic animals being cheerful and experiencing improved wellness.  Condition is generally very good, many are signed.  Some with tape marks and light corner bends.  Overall, an interesting representation of socially acceptable means of dealing with illness at the time.  To view the details on the collection click HERE . A collection of post cards introduced in five series of thirty created by renown artists of the day. Of the 150 cards this offering includes 119 original unused post cards and 31 photocopies  of the original cards (place holders).  The images were created by the artist, usually designed after one of their original works but making the Vin Mariani the featured element.  Many of the cards are captioned with reference to the product.  Other artists created completely new concepts to promote the tonic.   Each card measures 5 1/2" x 3 1/2". As an example, the artists in the first series Paul Avril,   F. Roybet,  Ch, Waltner,  Lévy-Dhurmer,  G, Meunier,  Paul Renouard,  H, Berteaux,  Muenier,  Mucha,  Hermann Paul,  Eug, Murer,  Lacault,  Ribéra,  K, Adler,  Léon Glaize,  Le Sidaner,  Paul-Albert Laurens,  Louis Noël,  Ferigoule,  A, Lalauze,  Hagborg,  Atalaya,  W, Bouguereau,  A, Maignan,  J, Cheret,  De Richemont,  Bigot,  Sem,  Léandre and  L, Vallet. .   At age 25, in 1863,  Angelo Mariani marketed a patent medicine called Vin Tonique Mariani a la Coca de Perou. Based on Bordeaux wind infused with three varietals of coca leaves in the bottle. It was immediately applauded as an ideal stomach stimulant, analgesic on the air passages and vocal chords, appetite suppressant, antidepressant and treatment against anemia.   Dosed as a small glass to be taken 3 times a day, 30 minutes before meals.  Each ounce contained 6 mg of cocaine.  Loved by kings and queens, popes and presidents, scientists and inventors, writers and dancers and more. Testimonials filled 15 leather -bound published volumes.