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Elise H Alber  A Letter from Elise H Alber to her friend, Lessie. .Cleveland.February 1853
A rather poetic letter written by Elise H Alber after her arrival in Cleveland. It appears that Elise was rather homesick after she and her brother moved to Ohio. The letter begins on a rather despondent note:  "Sealed alone in my chamber and feeling somewhat sad, I am about to write to you to see if it will not drive away the blues."  Shortly there after it picks up, describing a snow storm they recently had and the sleigh rides that resulted from the storm. The letter continues on to describe an Episcopal wedding she and her brother were invited to. While the letter is address to a Mary E Poor of Piermont, NH, Elise often refers to her as Lissie in the letter.  Measures 8 1/2" x 6 3/4" (folded sheet) . Minor toning and soiling due to age.
Polly Fancher. Correspondence Between Siblings, Clinton, NY, 1827. .Clinton, NY.1827
A letter, dated November 3rd, 1827, from Polly Fancher to her brother Bela a student at Hamilton College in Clinton, New York. The missive goes through the general health of the whole family. The only one current ill, is their father who is suffering from an inflammation of they eye, which seems to be a semi regular occurrence for him. The letter continues on to mention that Bela will be getting some visitors soon, his brothers! Towards the conclusion of the letter Polly begins to discuss some financial struggles and her hopes that he is doing well. Measures 12 1/4" x 7 1/4" (Folded Letter sheet). Minimal toning due to age. A small tear along the crease folds on the page of the letter. The front of the half fold has a 4 in tear along the fold crease.
Handwritten Letter from Mrs. Frances Hall to Mrs. Heagy Regarding Help with Clothing her Children. ..1952
A pencil written letter from Mrs. Frances Hall to Mrs. Heagy writing to seek her assistance in clothing her children. 1952. The note was delivered to Mrs. Heagy by Johnny Hall, her son who apparently worked for Mrs. Heagy. Written by a poorly educated woman in partial sentences first praising the recipient for being so nice to her son and then asking for old clothes she may have for children “I have got girles and boy all size”. She then discusses the need to work “to pay up my Bill it takes so much to clothes the children”. Envelope included. .
 The Boob Wheel Co., Circular Letter Head. The Boob Wheel Co..Cincinnati OH.1909
A 9 1/4" in diameter letterhead printed on paper die-cut in the shape of a circle, with wheel and spoke border design. The company sold wheels, poles  and shafts, so the wheel shaped letterhead was a natural promotion for product awareness. Reverse is blank.  Accompanied by file note responding to the correspondence..
Anna "Annie" Brown Pegg Goodbye Letter to Husband and Children written on Deathbed. .Alexandria, NJ.1900
In 1900 Annie Pegg wrote a letter to her husband and two children Sarah and James on her supposed deathbed (she would actually live until 1914 and have another child, Elizabeth). It is unknown if she was actually severely ill or just over dramatic, however the letter itself is very sincere. In it she writes that her husband should "forget me not when far away for you no I was true to you" and often asks her husband and children to put their "trust in God for he alone will care for you." She continues "this advice is from your Dear Mother, be true children to all" The letter is written in a notebook, that besides this letter is blank. The cover depicts two chicks and a frog with the phrase "You're No Chicken". Printed cover, tape binding on top. Measures 5 1/4" x 3 1/2". Anne, also known as Annie, was born on May 12, 1868 to Henry Smith Brown (1840-1896) and Charity Johnson (1839-1874) in Franklin, NJ. She married Christopher Pegg (1844-1920) in 1894 and had 3 children, Sarah J Pegg (1895-1984), James Green Pegg (1898-1975), and Elizabeth May Brown Pegg (1904-1991). She died on August 28, 1914.
Letter from US Attorney, Department of Justice advising citizen to remove hide his camera, 1942. ..
A single page typed letter from the Department of Justice, United States Attorney written to Mr. Louis M. Kelly of Whitman, Mass.   It is in response to a recent correspondence sent to the FBI by Whitman.   The response was written by the assistant US Attorney, Gerald J. McCarthy and recommends that he removed the short wave band from his radio set and under no circumstances should he allow his wife, (Flora M. Kelly) access to his Brownie 2-A camera. As a citizen, Mr. Kelly was entitled to have the camera , but... "In other words the responsibility for her not having it in her possession, in her custody, or under her control is entirely upon yourself".  With original envelope..
E. C. Gardner (Eugene Clarence) Homes and How to Make Them. James R Osgood and Company.Boston.1874
314 page book, with gilt stamped covers, 1st edition. The book compiles forty-three (43) letters between an architect and his friends. These letters "are composed of hints and suggestions relating to to building of homes... [and] aim to give practical information to those about to build." This book is a wonderful piece of early architectural Americana style known as ‘Stick Style.’ This book features 30 black and white illustrations, some of which are full page blue prints to houses or rooms described in the letters. The list of illustrations has two pictures entitled 'On a Sidehill' and 'Only One Corner', supposedly printed on pages 43 and 48 respectively. However, this is not the case, they are located earlier in the book, one opposite the title page and the other right before the first letter begins. All the other illustrations are located where they are supposed to be. . Minor edge wear, particularly on the spine. Minor foxing.
 Personal Correspondence from a young women to her Mother. .Atlanta, Georgia .1868
The double sided letter to the writer's mother shares an update about their life and gossip. The letter is written on Memphis and Charleston Railroad Letterhead from Atlanta, Georgia during the period of Reconstruction. The writer discusses recent illness, a bad cold, and general news about the going on of their day. She also expressed her dislike of the recent rainy weather stating "I have come to the conclusion that the lovely Springs of the 'Sunny South' are a myth or else beyond the recollections of the oldest inhabitant". Toward the end she also claims that she is awful for writing such an awful letter with all the complaints of her life and hopes to do better as a person. 9 3/4" x 7 1/2"    .
A Charming Letter from a Father to a Daughter with Illustrations.  1921.. ..1921
A playful yet instructive letter from a father to a daughter who presumably is away with her mother.   Perhaps she is recovering from an injury.  It begins with the father acknowledging how his daughter’s improved use of her hands and encouraging her to continue.  It proceeds to discuss a crying baby and how unbecoming crying is to older children.  He discusses his experiences sleeping in a conch hammock, under the stars and an itemized list of items he found in a drawer.  Written in a lighthearted manner with naïve illustrations. . letter fold creases
 Brown, Taggard & Chase - School Books, Medical Books, Stationary. Brown, Taggard & Chase.Boston.
A single-fold 8" x 5" circular with an engraving of the exterior of the Brown, Taggard & Chase location at 25 & 29 Cornhill, Boston.  Promtes School Books, Medical Books and Stationery.  Note within discusses an order..
Simon Two Letters from a Mother to Her Child, with integrated naive drawings, August 1929. .Boston MA.10806
Two whimsical letters from a mother to one of her two daughters, Elizabeth Simon (nicknamed Betty). The first letter mentions a visit to their cousin Ruth, who has two cats on her roof. The missive continues on asking her how here hay fever is doing and if she has had anytime to play with the kitten next door. Lastly it mentions the mother has been so busy that morning that even though it is 11 AM, she still hasn't had time to fix her hair.The letter is embellished with four pen and ink drawing- two cats on a roof of house, little girl playing with cats, four children riding on a horse, and two children playing in the water. The second letter is longer than the first. It starts with the mother telling Betty that she has been feeling better lately, though her hip is hurting her pretty badly so she will most likely stop riding soon. It discusses a visit from their Aunt and a picnic lunch she had a Lake Waldon. There she watched several children on a water slide. She then inquires after what Betty has been doing in her spare time and if she has any stories to share, such as a stubbed toe perhaps or a bee landed on her nose? It ends with the hope that Betty will borrow her sister's, Barbara's, water wings to help her float.  In-text drawings of  a water slide, a child landing in the water, and presumably Betty with a bee on her nose. Measures 5 1/4" x 3 1/4" (folded card) . The envelope is toned due to age and the letters themselves some minor soiling, otherwise fine.
K. Nagashima Japanese Tea Advertisement on Rice Paper. The Morey Mercantile Co..Shizuoka, Japan.13636
An advertisement, written on rice paper, for Solitaire Tea which was a green tea produced in the Shizuoka region of Japan. Solitaire Tea was produced by the Morey Mercantile Co, based in Denver, CO, and it was first launched In 1902. It was a part of the Solitaire Brand, the company's premium quality store brand, which provided various spices, coffee, tea and canned fruits and vegetables. This advertisement is a letter sent directly from  the tea agent located in Shizuoka, Japan in May 1937. The agent, K. Nagashima, describes the tea garden from which Solitaire Tea comes from, "the hillsides are now entirely covered with green tea bushes, just sprouting their first crop of leaves that are very young and tender." The letter closes with the slogan for the tea, "Solitaire Tea once in a consumer's teapot makes a friend for life." The letter is written on rice paper, on top of which is a letterhead for the Solitaire Tea brand. It depicts two boxes of tea and at the center a Japanese woman sitting in her garden making tea. At the base of the letter is an illustration of a Mt. Fuji, the volcanic mountain located in the Shizuoka region of Japan. Under the mountain are small green hills, a river with a bridge, and finally in the foreground a tea garden with its tea bushes neatly lined in a row. The letter comes with an envelope, addressed to Mrs. H. A. Weinrech of Loveland, CO. On the envelope there is a depiction of a box of Solitaire Tea and the small illustration of the mountain with the tea garden that is also found at the base of the letter. The envelope is enclosed in a rice paper envelope that has been self sealed. Letter measures: 7" x 2 3/4" (folded), 22" x 7" (unfolded). Envelope measures: 8" x 3". The Morey Mercantile Co. was established in 1884 by Chester Stephen Morey (1847-1922)  and it sold a variety of coffee, spices, tea, canned goods, matches, writing tables, and cigars. Chester's son, John William Morey (1878-1956) took over the company in 1922 just after his father's death and grew the store into one of the largest grocery businesses in the West. In 1956, John Morey sold the business to Consolidated Foods Cooperation, but unfortunately died soon there after. In 2014, Chester's great-great-grandson, Mark A. Ferguson, open a restaurant in Denver, CO called Solitaire in honor of his family's history.
Catalogue of Cuts and Price List of Printing for Poultry and Live Stock Breeders and Business Men in General. Riverside Press.New York.
A catalogue that list and provides examples of illustrations that Poultry and Live Stock Breeders can use while advertising their products. At the beginning there is a price list for different sizes of envelopes, note head, memo head, letter heads, statements, shipping tags, post cards, circulars, folders and booklets. There are approximately 165 different images of live stock that farmers could choose from to help advertise their goods. While the majority of the images are of chickens (different kinds of chicks, hens, and roosters) there are also images of ducks, pigs, rabbits, dogs, turkeys, sheep, and goats. Additionally there are several fonts one can use from. 40 pg. (including covers). Staple booklet. Measures 9" x 6".
 Correspondence to Blanche Annis Leavitt, a Teacher from Belmont, NH. .Belmont, NY.1897 - 1911
Blanche Annis Leavitt (1881 - ?) was a teacher at Belmont Grammar School in in the early 1900s. The collection includes various correspondence and ephemera associated with her time at Belmont Grammar School, from her students to her co-workers, to her family. The bulk of the collection dates from 1901 - 1907, as Blanche would marry Ira Woodman Leavitt in 1907, and appears to have left the teaching profession. There is a total of forty-four (44) pieces in this collection: nine letters from students, four letters from family (mainly her nephews), five letters from friends, seven invites to various activities put on by students, and 19 pieces of ephemera (including 7 visiting cards). Collection is in chronological order. Items of note include: Teaching Certificate, December 1900 A handwritten teaching certificate awarded to Blanche Leavitt by E S Moulton, a member of the School Board of Belmont. New Hampshire Summer Institute for Teachers Program, August 1901 A 24 pp (including wrappers) program for the 8th annual Summer Institute session in Plymouth, NH from August 12-24, 1901. What was essentially an early teaching conference on education, there are lectures on drawing to arithmetic to psychology. The program lists each lesson available, the various transportation methods to get there, as well as a list of speakers. Courtship Letter, June 1903: Written by Clarence M Johnson, this letter describes a rather awful date he took Blanche on, when he took her for a drive. If appears as though nothing was on his side as the weather was terrible and Johnson spends most of the letter apologizing and asking to see her again. Kappa Sigma Fraternity Invite, February 1905 An invite from the Beta Kappa Chapter of the Kappa Sigma Fraternity at New Hampshire College (later became New Hampshire University) for a dinner. What is especially of note is the beautiful engraving of the star and crescent symbol associated with the fraternity. There is also visiting card for a Robert M Wright included with the invite. Family Letter, May 1906 While the letter itself gossips about the family and friends they know, included with the letter is a 1901 Canadian penny. It was given to her to "fill up her bank" Various Letters from Students, circa 1906 - 1907 The majority of these seem to have been written after Blanche Leavitt has left the Belmont Grammar School. In general, the children write a little bit about their life and their new teacher, Ms. Hill. It is apparent in the letters that the children prefer Leavitt to their new teacher. To view this collection please click on the following link: https://photos.app.goo.gl/gAvJOxp4gBgdTf5S2.
Satanus Diabolus Handbill Placed In Hymnbooks - Letters from Hell to President Bartlett, No. 3682. ..1887
A satirical letter written to criticize President Bartlett, the president of Dartmouth College. The letter is written from the devil to his servant, President Bartlett and critiques his reason behavior and decisions in regard to a 'Unitarian affair'. The letter is signed 'Your Master, Satanus Diabolus' which is Latin for 'Satan Devil'. Below are some quotes from the letter: "But some of your doings of late have given me pain... Now the ridiculous figure you cut at Senior Biblicals the other morning was enough to move a hardened crocodile to tears. The way you raged and stamped and yelled "take off your hat" reminded me of a senile buffalo in a fit of the tantrums." "And when you gave your three reasons, in such a magnanimous tone, why you had decided to allow students to attend Unitarian services, you did not mention the fourth very imperative reason, viz. :that the Trustees fell on you as wolves on a lamb (I beg pardon of the lamb for the comparison)." Single sheet. Measures 9 1/4" x 5".. An excerpt from Old Dartmouth on Trial: The Transformation of the Academic Community in  Nineteenth Century America by Mary Tobias ....An in 1887 a student (or students) placed a "Letter from Hell" in the students' hymnbooks, which they opened during required chapel services; it was addressed to President Bartlett and singed "Santanus Diabolu".
Frank Hiram Crosby Letter from a Commission Merchant regarding Wood and Flour on French's Hotel Letterhead. .New York.1859
A letter written by Frank Hiram Crosby, most likely a commission merchant, in New York. It is unclear who he is writing to, but in the letter he discusses the price of flour he purchased, three to five cents per pound, and the sale of wood. He goes into some about of detail regarding the wood, as it seems as though it was harvested from two different locations, one of which produced a higher quality wood, and therefore fetched a better price. The letter concludes with the recommendation that the recipient get in touch with the foreman of the lumber company to see if they can purchase next season's wood from the preferred location in advanced. The letter itself is written on a letterhead from the French's Hotel in New York, where a single room was 50 cents per day and the letterhead request that one should "not believe runners or hackmen who say we are full."  Measures 9 1/4" x 13 3/4" ..
 Illustrated Billhead - William Coulson & Sons, Manufactures & Merchants of General Household Linens . William Coulson & Sons.New York.1914
William Coulson & Sons was a founded in 1764 by William Coulson in Lisburn, Ireland. It manufactured on large looms a variety of fine household linen goods, such as table cloths and napkins. The company were the creators of 'damask linen' and the first company to successfully working in the  fabric armorial devices, national emblems, and heraldic designs. The also were a one point holders of a Royal Warrant from King George III, King George IV, Queen Victoria, and King Edward VII. This billhead is for their New York offices and is dated December 19, 1914. A large stylized engraving covers the top third of the billhead, and features three illustrations. The largest on is an image of a man working at a damask loom. Of the two smaller images, one features the seal of King George V, (in reference to their Royal Warrant), and the second features a woman seated at an Irish spinning wheel. The billhead is a receipt for A. E. Carlton, Esq of Cripple Creek, Colorado. Single page. Measures 11" x 9".
George F. Murdock Composition Notebook for the Winter Term of George F. Murdock. .Stow, MA.1879-1880
A composition notebook for twelve year old George F. Murdock during the winter term of his "3rd Class". It has thirteen (13) short essays, short stories, and/or sample letters with subjects ranging from Paul Revere, a description of what is in the classroom or seen from his window, and a short story of about a man on the moon. Murdock himself would late go on in life to become an educator and high school principal. It is clear that some of these entries were graded as the majority have a grade written on the top in pencil. Presumably each assignment was graded out of ten points, and Murdock received 9's, 9.5's, and 10's. Below are some excerpts from the composition notebook: "This man lives in a yellow farm house which contains sixteen rooms. Besides the house the man has a a woodshed, a large barn, and a farm containing one thousand acres which covers the surface of the moon. His farm is a very valuable one requiring but little attention except in harvest time' so the man has a good deal of leisure and makes himself very comfortable. He is the only person found on the moon; but once a balloon containing several persons lost it sway , and while trying to get back to the earth it touched the moon near the man's house. The people were kindly cared for by the man and after several months they set sail for the earth which they reached safety..." - Excerpt from "The Man in the Moon", January 8th, 1880 "One Thanksgiving evening when I had been indulged at the supper table more hat usual I went to bed while the clock was striking eight and was soon asleep. I dreamed I was preparing to go to Europe. I spent a week packing my trunk and arranging things at home so that they would be preserved until I returned. I arrived at the depot which seemed to be somewhere in New York and went aboard the train for Boston. On reaching that city I hired a hackman to carry me to the wharf. After riding about ten hours the hack stopped; I stepped out and found myself in a forest. I gazed around for a minute and turned to speak to the coachman; but he, the carriage, and horses were all gone. Suddenly night came on, and it began to rain. After many wanderings I found an opening in a rock; I entered and found a large room under the rock with supper waiting for me to which I bountifully helped myself, and then went to bed..." - Excerpt from "A Dream", January 26, 1880 Tan wrappers, lined interior pages, two thirds full. Measures 8 1/4" x 6 3/4". George Frederick Murdock was born March 8, 1867 to Charles Nathanael Murdock (1835-1904) and Julia Ann Temple (1841-1873) in Hopkinton, MA. He had at least one sibling: Charles Henry Murdock (1865-?). He married Abbie Barker Wade (1867-1939) on February 9, 1893 and had three children: Arthur Wade Murdock (1893-?), Evelyn Louise Murdock (1897-1980), and Frederick M. Murdock (1911-1995). George was the Principal of Major Victor E. Edwards High School in West Boylston High for twenty six (26) until his retirement in 1938. His date of death is unknown.
Heliogravure and ALS by Louis Morin.  Risque imagery. c1890s
A single-page heliogravure created by Louis Morin, publisher.  The content of the letter discusses the publishing of a book including the cost of "aquarelle" or watercolor. Penned and signed by Louis Morin.  Measures 5 3/4" x 9"..
 Three Letters from a Family Moving to South America. Buenos Aires, Argentina.February 1855
In early 1855, a husband and wife, moved to Buenos Aires, Argentina, Estancia del Folag with their two sons, Hasen and Jonathan. The collection contains three letters, comprised of eighteen pages, written to the wife's friend. Color vignette on first page with stationer's embossing on remaining sheets. The letters are only signed "Affectionally yours" with no name. The letters describe some of the hardship she had adjusting and the difficulty in settling up her household. The majority of the letters comprises of the retelling of a long carriage ride taken during the move. At first the wife seems determined to find fault in everything in South America, often mentioned the lack of manners of the locals and how filthy everything is. "There is no places of resort or of being of interest, no pleasant walks or rides, in fact nothing except catholic churches. Plenty of those if you are inclined to visit them." Eventually, she begins to enjoy her surrounds and find companionship in her neighbors, and in particular an American named Judy. She even waxes poetically about the fruit she can get there, and how much the whole family enjoys it. "I determined from the first of my decision to come to make up my mind to nothing and then I should not be disappointed." "I am not homesick, and though we are what many would call unpleasantly situated, I never had so happy [a] two months in my life as the last two." These three letters have been hand-bound by a thread into a booklet. The first page has a hand colored illustration on the top. Measures 8 1/2" x 5 1/2". Age toning and light soiling. The first page has a 1 1/2" x 1/2" spot of what appears to be red wax from a seal.
George E. Haines Civil War Letter From George E. Haines Regarding the Death of his Friend on the Battlefield. .Falmouth, VA.c1865
A single fold letter by George E. Haines, a union soldier, written in the throws of grief over the recent death of his close friend, Stephen, who he "loved like a brother". The letter is addressed to "Dear Sir", but it is clear that he is addressing a family member or close friend of Stephen, and is in fact responding to their request to tell them of his death. George starts his retelling by stating he and his company were in the middle of a retreat and he was about 20 feet in front of Stephen when he heard him cry out. "I looked around and Steve had both hands up to his breast and was bent over and looking at me. At that time, all of our company had gone but me and I was left all alone but I ran back the moment I saw him and caught hold of him and asked him where he was struck but he could not speak or did not know that he was stricken, for I had hardly taken hold of him before he fell. I looked in his face and spoke to him but I say that it was useless for he was to all appearances dead. I should not feel so confident but I have seen so many die on the battlefield." He continues on to describe how he had to leave Stephen behind as the enemy was close, "I hardly know how I managed to get out of it safe and I think it was a miracle that I did so. I hardly know what made me, but I wished after I joined the company that I had laid down beside Stephen and let them take me prisoner for about all my patriotism vanished."  At the end of the letter, even though George is convinced that Stephen is dead, he does add a post script detailing where wounded from the battle were taken, but also adding that the dead have been buried by "either our men or the Rebels." Measures 7 3/4" x 5 3/4"..
 A Pair of Letters from Emily to her Family discussing her trip to Yorktown, particularly her experience at a "Colored Meeting" . Yorktown.January 1869
A pair of letters from Emily to her family keeping them appraised of her trip to Yorktown [NY] in January 1869. The two letters are written within a day of one another, with one addressed to her parents and one to her brother. The family's last name is not mentioned. The letters are jam-packed with the events of daily life. She is somewhat ill perhaps with consumption and speaks often of her health.  Additionally religion plays a significant role in her writing.  Of note in the letters is Emily's description of a 'colored meeting' she went to, which was a church service for African Americans. Emily writes about how the 'spirit' moved the church members to what she perceived as frightening noises and groans, and that due to this she wouldn't feel comfortable going to another service. The letters also discuss Emily's health and her fear that she might have bronchitis. As well as updates on her family. Measures 7 3/4" x 4 3/4". Below are a few excerpts from the letters. "I went to a colored meeting one evening and does seem to me I could not go again, they hold it late about 10 o'clock and the spirit moves them to such noises and actions, sometimes they would screech [sic] and shot and sing and groan till it seemed like confusion confounded. I pitied [sic] them for there is no white-folks church to learn from and I was almost frightened so I did not get to sleep until late that night." -  Emily to her parents, January 12, 1869  "Samuel saw an old French Dr. on the boat- when he went to B. - and told him how I was, said he should call it a dry consumption. He said worse than Dr. Powers. Sad I ought to stay here a year and then not stay where it was a cold winter. Said he thought if I could have the chills it would change the course of the disease... I think our little bute [sic] is getting to be a little fast, got so she runs away  from school (well seems to me I should have one of the boys go out to help her from running away - Little boys I mean) It seems Emilus likes me best and don't hesitate to tell of it - I know Abbie must feel bad to have him say anything. " Emily to her Brothr January 1869.  Marginalia in every blank space. From a margin note: "I was selling a negro some woolen pips and he stole one out of the box right under my nose-- I did not know enough not to hand him the box - so I let him pick out one and he got 2". A stream of consciousness with abrupt changes in subject matter from sentence to sentence, as expressed in the second quote above.
 The Aerifying Egg Beater Circular and Letter. Hale & Company.Newburyport, MA.1866
A circular filled with testimonials for the Aerifying Egg Beater patented in 1866 and produced by Hale & Company in Newburyport, MA. The first page has a wonderful woodcut of the manufacturing building of Hale & Co., along with a description of  the item. The beater uses a "system of aerifying, as it fills the eggs with minutely divided and finely subdivided particles or globules of pure air." The interior of the circular lists numerous testimonials. On the back of the circular is draft of a letter written by J. Hale Jr, owner of Hale & Company, to a William Pebt, Esq. regarding the possible sale of a mailing list of approximately 5,000 names and address. The letter is dated January 31, 1870, and when Hale & Co. had been bought out by another company.  Single fold circular. Measures 10 3/4" x 8" (folded).
 The New Letter Writer Containing a Variety of Letters on the Following Subjects: Relationship, Business, Love, Courtship and Marriage, Friendship, and Miscellaneous Letters. . Richard Marsh.New York.1853
96pp. Yellow illustrated wrappers depicts gent reading a letter with vignettes of women in border decoration.. Contains examples of a total of 85 letters for nearly circumstance one can imagine. From a young tradesman to his father to from a sailor to his wife and From a young man whose Master had lately died to an urgent demand of payment. On the front cover has an engraving of a man leaning on a desk, reading a letter. OCLC -5 (Feb 2019). Measures 4 1/4" x 2 3/4"..
 Documents associated with the early development of the Holyoke to South Hadley Falls Bridge including pledge petition, receipt for survey and plans, and bill heads for material printing and Bridge Committee dinner receipt 1870. . ..1870
The documents include As a single-fold 9 3/4" x 7 3/4" hand written pledge petition beginning with "We the undersigned interested in a Bridge between Holyoke & South Hadley Falls promise to pay the amount opposite our respective names for the purpose of processing plans and making surveys for the same and the expenses". This is followed by 79 signatures and pledge amounts. A receipt from D. Briggs & Co, Springfield for the survey and plans totaling $300.00. An 8" x 5" illustrated billhead from the Ingleside, Holyoke Mass. The fee is for Dining and addressed to the Bridge Committee. The bill head is printed in green ink with a fine illustration of the exterior of the establishment including the street scene. A 7" x 8" billhead for printing of associated materials including petitions and rulings, advance notices for various newspapers, postage and printing supplies totaling $75.50. The letterhead is printed in three colors with a vignette of an eagle carrying an American shield. Printed in various decorative fonts in three colors. .
An Address before the Emma Willard Association and  a collection of School work by Helen Harrison Hadley (nee Morris) from her time at Vassar College
This grouping or 21 works begins with an address made by Helen Harrison Hadley  to the Emma Willard Association at their annual banquet in November 1901. The Association’s mission was to unite the graduates of the Troy Seminary in a friendly alliance, and to co-operate in promoting the cause of higher education among women. Emma Willard was an American women's rights activist who dedicated her life to education who founded the first school for women's higher education, the Troy Female Seminary in Troy, New York. Hadley was a member of this association, and it unknown if she gave this address or simple kept a copy of it. The address starts: “Our daughters cannot advantageously be medieval at the present day…. Time was when the right to study earnestly, to think intelligently, to base one’s daily action on reason and self-control, was reserved for men; but that is not more.”  Includes a written and typed copy of the address. Additionally, this offering includes a collection of 18 additional writings of Hadley. The bulk of the materials are 14 school assignment in essay format Hadley wrote for various courses during her time at Vassar. These assignments ranged from essays to short story telling, to book reports to her answer to a test. Most of the assignments have been graded in red pen and often start with an outline before the essay. Helen would graduate Vassar in 1883. Below are the titles of the Assignments: "Are Woman Inferior to Men?" "Nicaragua" (which describes her cousins trip there) "The Wit and Wisdom of Children" x2 "People and their Hobbies" "Having a Picture Take" "The Two Portraits of Shakespeare" "The Use and Abuse of Policy" x2 "The Word Painting in "A Princess of Thule ", a novel by W. Black "Advertising and it Oddities" "Swift: Shall We Pity or Despise Him?" "A Brother and Sister" Test The essays present an interesting view as to the character and beliefs of Ms. Hadley.   Helen would graduate Vassar in 1883, and marry Arthur Twining Hadley in 1891. Arthur would become the 13th President of Yale in 1899. It would appear that for the summer of 1899, Helen spent the majority of the time in New Haven, helping her husband settle into his new role, while a caretaker looked after her three children: her two sons Morris and Hamilton, and her new born daughter, Laura, at the family farmstead in Sandy Hook, CT. There are four letters from that time which are essential reports to Helen on how her children are doing. The four letters are held together by a blue ribbon, most of which has become detached. Another item in this collection is a letter from Edward G Fullerton, a graduate student in the Divinity School at Yale. It appears that he had broken his leg, and Helen had loaned him her copies of the Century Magazine which help to “while away very pleasantly several hours of [his] imprisonment”. The letter continues on to discuss the fact that Fullerton misses seeing the starts at the Yale Observatory. What is truly remarkable about this letter is the pen drawing done by Fullerton, showing him walking with crutches in a cast. To view this collection please click on the following link: https://photos.app.goo.gl/cN50huSmpE2yvHbs1 
 Collection of Correspondence and Memorabilia of Clara Wallower, Wellesley College, Class of 1902. .Wellesley, MA.1896-1936
This collection centers around Clara Wallower's time at Wellesley. The majority of the collection consists of correspondence addressed to Clara, starting in 1896 when she was attending Dana Hall. In total there are over forty (40) letters. The early letters are mostly from her friends or family in Pennsylvania. Two of these early letters express concern over how much Clara is fretting over her school work. As these letters were written in, or around the time of Clara's grandmothers death in 1896 it is likely that they were worried about how Clara's grief was affecting her. Two letters are from the same friend, Rowena Millar, who writes, in great detail, about a disagreement the two had. Some of the letters are addressed to "Taddie", an apparent nickname for Clara. One such letter is from March 1900, sent by her father. He was visiting Joplin, checking on the progress of his various business ventures there while staying at the hotel he owned, the Keystone Hotel. In the letter he discusses a banquet he will be attending that will benefit the Joplin branch of the YMCA. Additionally, he also sent and discusses a newspaper clipping that announced Rockefeller's gift of $100,000 to Wellesley. In 1897, Clara and her parents took a trip to Europe. After she returned home, one of her fellow traveling partners, Mary, who had continued on with her European tour, wrote to Clara of her experiences. The letter consists of Mary's time in Germany in August/September of 1897. She was present when the King of Siam, King Chulalongkorn, otherwise known as Rama V, visited Germany on his grand European tour. She saw him two times, first while visiting the Charlottenburg Palace and the tomb of Queen Louise of Prussia, where he was touring there with Prince Albert. Apparently both their carriages left at the same time, and Mary's carriage was able to drive side-by-side with the King’s for several minutes. According to Mary, the King smiled and bowed to them. The second time Mary saw him was during a parade held in his honor in Berlin. She describes the parade as "thirty to forty thousand troops, all finely dressed, marched by and the Kaiser and Kaiserin on horseback." Mary concludes the letter discussing various gifts she purchased, such as a seal fur coat, and how she developed the film she had taken on the trip. Clara received three letters from an Olive Wells, who was also on a world tour at the time. The first letter in July 1897 describes her trip to China. Olive was not impressed at all by China, and was horrified by several of the things she saw there. She describes how Chinese woman would have their feet bound and are therefore unable to walk without the help of a maid. She describes how disturbed she was to see dead rats for sale on the streets and how she was called 'foreign devil'. She appears to have gotten along better on a small island she stopped on, during her passage from Hong Kong to Sydney, Australia. Her second letter is from October 1897 when she has already reached Italy. She talks briefly about her time in Italy and the cities she plans to visit, before discussing the classes she would like to take back at Wellesley and where she might stay when she returns. Her last letter is from January 1898, when she has returned to her home in Brooklyn, NY. In this letter, she is responding to some relationship drama between one of their common friends, Carrie, and her ex-fiance Don. Don had written Clara (letter is included in collection) asking her to talk with Carrie and report back to him. Clara, unsure of what to do, had turned to Olive for advice. Most of the remaining correspondences are either invites between Clara and other Wellesley girls, inviting each other to lunch, or courtship correspondence. For instance in 1897 she received two letters from a suitor, W. M. Murdock, who requests the pleasure of her presence at a Yale vs Harvard game. There is another letter from an Edward Moore, begging Clara's forgiveness for missing their date due to illness. There are a dozen or so other courtship invites that don't mention Clara by name, but appear to either be invites for groups of people to dances at an unnamed country club or hotel in Pennsylvania.                               In addition to the correspondence, there are also various items of memorabilia relating to Clara's time at Wellesley. First is Clara's formal acceptance letter to Wellesley, as well as her academic transcript that she would have needed to present to the school's Secretary upon her arrival. There are two programs from Wellesley Tree Day, dated 1897 and 1899. There is a program from 1896's Float Day. On the back inside cover of this program is a list of who she went with, which includes Olive and Mary. The last couple of programs in this collection are from the Glee and Mandolin Club Concert for the years 1897 and 1899. The collection also includes various invites either to or from Clara to a variety of clubs or activities at Wellesley. The first of which is the Agora of Wellesley, which is a political society that would meet to debate the various important worldly issues. There are two invites, the first of which is from 1897 to discuss the 'Cuban question', and the second is from 1900 to discuss the 'Transvaal question'. The second society Clara appears to have been a member of is the Tau Zeta Epsilon Society, whose goals are to further the study of arts in a scholarly fashion. The invite 'requests the pleasure of your company at The Barn'. It is dated April 23rd, with no year, but as it also mentions the day of the week (Monday), it is most likely form 1900. The next few items also lack a year, however it has been deduced by the day of the week. The first is invitation is from the "Faculty of Stone Hall" from 1899. The second is an invitation from the class of 1899 to meet the class of 1898 from June 1898. The last two are replies from two girls in 1899, who are accepting the invitation of the class of 1902. One of these replies comes with an envelope address to Clara, so it would appear as though she played some role in hosting this event. The last two items of the collection are a bit of outliers. The first is an original song composed by 'Elizabeth' in 1900. The relationship between Clara and Elizabeth is unknown. The last item dates to 1936. It is a typed copy of an address given by Albertine Reichle (Class of 1939) in memory of "Norumbega's founder." As Norumbega is a building on the campus, it appears that it was meant to honor Alice Freeman Palmer, the president of Wellesley college when it was built. The guest of honor was then Wellesley President Ellen Fitz Pendleton, who would die later that year. Taken as a whole  this collection of over 55 items provides a great window into the life of a Wellesley girl at the turn of the 19th century. To view this collection, please click on the following link: https://goo.gl/photos/7tkUCSU17pfsqNVN6. Clara Wallower was born on April 16, 1880 to Elias Zollinger Wallower and Maria Dorothy Hoover Wallower in Harrisburg, PA. Her father was a prominent business man who owned the Harrisburg Star Independent newspaper and was also member of a group of Harrisburg investors who were financing mining operations in the mineral district of southwestern Missouri. He took great personal interest in the growth of Joplin, Missouri, investing much of his own personal wealth in the city, and even eventually building the Keystone Hotel in downtown Joplin. Due to her father's financial success, Clara grew up in wealth and privilege. She attended the Dana Hall School, which is an independent boarding and day school for girls located in Wellesley, Massachusetts. The school served as Wellesley College's unofficial preparatory program, and indeed Clara was admitted into the freshman class of 1898-1899 at Wellesley. She would eventually graduate in 1902 and settle back down in Harrisburg, PA and marry Horace Montgomery Witman. Horace was a graduate of Gettysburg College and the Yale Divinity School. He worked with his father and brother in a wholesale grocery business in Harrisburg. Together, Horace and Clara would have three children, Harriet Hoover Witman, William Witman II, and Barbara Carmony Witman. Her son William would become a Foreign Service Officer, eventually becoming the U.S. Ambassador to Togo. Both her daughters, Harriet and Barbara, would attend Wellesley College. Clara died in 1964.
9 Letters Between Sisters and Cousins, Wheelers and Spragues, Massachusetts 1819-1852
A series of nine letters from 1819-1852 from a Massachusetts family. In summary discussions include wanting to become a teacher to teach her siblings, a healing water in short supply to “cure” a little boys eye disease, the price of wheat, concerns about scarlet fever, the cost of a home ($400), a “hard cough” that may take a relative and the passing of a family member. The correspondence are both between cousins or siblings discussing their everyday lives.
Illustrated Letters by Anna Morey on her Grand European Tour
A collection of 6 illustrated letters with 24 pages written by Anna Morey while she and her husband traveled through Germany and towards Paris on their grand European Tour. Anna is clearly writing to a young boy, and most likely a family member (nephew or young cousin) she often makes reference to her parents (his grandparents). Anna and her husband Charles tour through the Germany countryside, mostly alongside the Rhine on a carriage. Some of the towns mentioned in the letters are: Godesbert, Unkel, Goppingen, Ahrweiler, Lochmuhle, Neuwied, Brussels, Cologne, Brun, Koblenz, and Salzig. Inserted into the letters are tiny sketches, done in pen, of some of the sites and people Anna encounters. Additionally, she adds several printed pictures of the hotels or castles she visits. There is a total of nine drawings and six prints. The collection contains two completed letters and two separate sheets that are partial letters.  Below are some quotes from the letters: “It was very refreshing & we found they used it for all purposes, even the horses were watered with the same drink and I offered a dipper full to the master puppy but one taste was quite enough for although very hot, he showed there was difference by leaving it.” – Discussing Godesberg’s Mineral Spring “These castles on the Rhine look very picturesque from the river or road below and it seems sad when within its crumbled walls to feel that time will do the same to all we now behold. So we too must all pass away and be forgotten like those who once inhabited them.” “Unkel – A very small town I shall always remember, the stones were by nature arranged in the such a curious manner. One could be easily reminded of the Giant’s Causeway form the picture books for that is the only place I’ve seen it.” “Passing through the town of Lochmuhle, we were assailed by beggars and for the first time since the journey commenced. The dog was quick to know they had had no right to ask, or rather trouble us, and his pellicular look was enough to make them think he would bite them. His hair stood out as though he was constantly electrified and he barked as through his lungs were never in better order, than when he was using them.” (accompanied by an illustration of the dog) “Most all the working people smoke pipes [in] this form, and sometimes they are half a yard long and attached to the belt.” (accompanied by an illustration of a man smoking a pipe) “You can give my love to all, and pass the letter round as I cannot write to each one. Kiss all for me and when you grow to be a man and I am an old lady, I shall expect you to write me.” “… and to see the fine Caste of Ehrenbreitstein. We took a guide and examined it with much interest… We saw plenty of soldiers, a great many cannons and ammunition of all kinds but the view of the town was charming.” - aka Ehrenbreitstein Fortress
Correspondence  Yeates Institute Student  Belmont, Lancaster PA to student attending Phillips Academy, Andover MA. 1901-1903
Correspondence from Christopher Greaves, who had attended Yeates Institute, Belmont, Lancaster PA to Ludwig F. C. Haas, of Lancaster PA while attending Phillips Academy, Andover MA. 1901-1903
LT. Edward A Kimpel, Letters - WWII Correspondence re War, Homefront & Parenting.
A collection of approximately 145 letters from a US Navy Reserve Communications Officer during World War II. Lt (JG) Edward Andrew Kimpel Jr served in the Navy in the Pacific Ocean Theater from 1942 to 1945. The lengthy correspondence between him and his family members, mainly his wife, Virginia, covers a variety of topics, including but not limited to: naval battles in Pacific Ocean Theater, attacks by Japan's airplanes, daily life on the ship, the censorship of wartime correspondence, Edward's various duties on the aircraft carriers he served on, discussions on wartime rations, and familial relationships between his wife, his parents, and his children.... Of particular note are the issue with son Edward (III) who later entered a life of crime. See complete discription for detail.
George Clement Lord A Collection of 21 Letters belonging the  Lord's Family Shipping Company. .Kennebunk, ME and Boston, MA.1836-1861
A collection of twenty-one (21) letters belonging to the Lord Family of Kennebunk, ME, mostly regarding their shipping company, which was also based in Boston, MA. The letters date from 1836 to 1861, and are mostly addressed to George C. Lord. Though a few of the letters are from employees or customers of the company the majority are from family members involved in the business. These members (and their relationship to George) are: his father, Captain George Lord, his brothers Edward W Lord and Charles Edward Lord, and later, his son, Charles E. Lord. A variety of shipping business subjects are covered in the letters, such as the types of cargo and their value (some goods mentioned are cotton, tallow, logwood, salt, railway supplies, and coal), several legal cases for the settlement of claims due to cargo loss, the sale of ships, insurance policies on the ships and cargo, various ship Captains employed by them, ship routes, and the various political policies that effect the shipping business such as the Letters of Marque issued by Confederate President Jefferson Davis that effectively sanctioned piracy as legal. Some of the ships mentioned in the letters are: ‘International', 'Josephine', 'G. W. Brown', 'Rigulator', 'Crimea', 'Golden Eagle', 'Hayes', 'Royal', and 'York'. The names of the ships owned by the company often reflect the names of family members or past favored employees. Also discussed are various family matters, such as relatives' health or present life. One letter from a customer discusses the transport of 'fleshpots of Egypt', which could alternatively mean either actual pots of meat or prostitutes. While in the end the author does seem to be referring to actual meat, the terminology he uses prior to that is more than slightly ambiguous. The last two letters in the collection are from 1861, on the eve of the American Civil War and discusses the author's, Charles E. Lord, displeasure at the hypocrisy of the North who no longer want a war when it hits them in their pocket books, as well as the effect the war is having on the shipping business. Four of the letters come with corresponding envelopes, however the majority of the letters were folded paper with stampless post. The collection is arranged chronologically, one letter is missing a date. Below are some excerpts from the letters:

"Thirdly your sympathy and sorrow expressed for my having had to pay twice the 3-9 to the port to look after the fleshpots of Egypt I thank you for. But surely you who no doubt go nightly and perhaps daily down into that very Montezuma of Egypt enjoying and all the luxuries of that balmy, soft, and delicious land - ought not to chasten a poor old fellow who can no longer journey there and can only now enjoy the remembrance of the part by scenting fleshpots of that magical country in the shape of a thigh of pork."
-  Daniel Nason to George C. Lord, December 2, 1847

"Please ask father to write us how much insurance they will want on the Wm Brown, we will cancel present policies and take out new ones for the voyage. Present policies expire Dec 1st - should think $36000 on the ship and either 10 or 15000 on charter out. They must bear in mind that the commission on the homeward charter are to be paid lost or not safe - say $1500(sic) perhaps $12000 on charter would be enough. No news here. we notice the Henry Mann seen Aug 31 - Lat. 28 South of the Island of Madagascar, then out 70 days - at that rate she would not be in Rotterdam before Christmas - but we hope to hear of her at Falmouth by the steamer due tomorrow morning."
- George C Lord to his brother Edward W. Lord, September 1, 1852.

"In regards to business affairs I have nothing, I am sorry to say, very interesting or cheering to relate. The 'International' is in Dock discharging- has her between docks now about clear. While she was laying in the river they were obliged to keep one pump going most of the time to keep her free of water and when at sea in rough weather both, but since she has been in Dock, she leaks but very little - say one to two inches per hour.... Political affairs in the United States seem to have assumed a more peaceful aspect and yet as to the future we are as much in the dark as ever. I am sorry to see that the passage of the Tariff Bill has caused a great change in the minds of the people here - their sympathies seem to have made a complete change from the North to the South. It is very easy to see how deep seated their philanthropy is for the poor downtrodden slave when their own interests are at all encroached upon. I think the change in the Tariff just at this time was a very unwise thing with the North and one which will fail to have its desired effect. It will operate against the commercial interests of the North and be of no benefit to the manufacturing interest. Foreign merchandise with fine it way into the country through the Southern ports and Canada without paying the high duty and that the whole object of the tariff will be frustrated. Therefore in my opinion, if the new administration wish to save their 'credit and bacon', they had better abandon the Tariff scheme at once and look to some other source of revenue."
- Charles E. Lord to his father, George C. Lord, April 2, 1861

"The truly deplorable state of the anarchy which our one peaceful and happy country is now in makes all news coming from there of thrilling interest, though saddening to the hear to contemplate. It is comforting to now that the people of the North are so united and that party lines are so completely obliterated. If war must come I hope the President will bring all the resources of the country into the field and make on bold strike at the Rebels. It is too late now for any half way measures. they have desperate men to deal with and desperate measures must be used to put them down or the country is lost and ruined further... The underwriters at large are now asking from 1% to 10 % additional premium on cargo in American ships, depending upon their position or account of the Letters of Marque issued by Jeff Davis. "
- Charles E. Lord to his father, George C. Lord, May 4, 1861
George Clement Lord was born about 1823 in Kennebunk, Maine to Captain George Lord (1791-1861) and Olive Jefferds (1793-1879). He had five siblings: Hannah Elizabeth Lord (1817-1833), Lucy Hayes Lord (1818-1833), Olive Jeffords Lord (1821-1821-1829), Charles Howard Lord (1825-1892) and Edward W. Lord (1830-1903). He married his cousin, Marion Ruthven Watterson (1823-1910) in 1866. They had four children together: Robert Waterson Lord (1847-1908), Marion Ruthven Lord (1849-1910), Caroline Lucy Lord (1852-1859), and Charles Edward Lord (1858-1941).  George Lord does on February 23, 1893.

His son, Charles. is also involved in the shipping business. Charles marries Effie Marion Rogers (1860-?) in 1855 and they have three children together: George C. Lord (1890-?), Marian Watterston Lord (1892-?), and Charles R. Lord (1893-?). He dies on August 1, 1941. He most likely died in August 1978.